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godslabrat

9-pin connectors still in production?

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Just curious... can one still buy new 9-pin Atari controller connectors? I know it was a de facto standard many years ago, so I'd guess someone mass produces them. I'd just like to make some adaptors, and I'd hate to cut up some perfectly good Genesis extension cables if I don't have to

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It's just a regular 9 pin sub d connector, that also is in use for serial communication on pc's. A lot of high end equipment still uses serial communication in-stet of usb. So i guess that it still is produced.

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It's just a regular 9 pin sub d connector, that also is in use for serial communication on pc's.

 

Really? It's been so long since I've seen a serial port, I didn't make the connection. Pun not intended.

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Yeah, but the serial connectors have annoying metal brackets on the sides that make them more difficult to plug into game systems. It's been a source of aggravation for me when making adapters for the Atari 5200, which uses a similar 15-pin connector.

Edited by Jess Ragan

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I didn't have much luck finding these (sans ears) a few months ago when I was working on a few joystick projects. If anyone has a source for "joystick" connectors instead of "serial" connectors, I would love to know.

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I didn't have much luck finding these (sans ears) a few months ago when I was working on a few joystick projects. If anyone has a source for "joystick" connectors instead of "serial" connectors, I would love to know.

 

On some DB9 connectors the metal part comes off pretty easily (indeed, I've had it come off when it wasn't supposed to).

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I didn't have much luck finding these (sans ears) a few months ago when I was working on a few joystick projects. If anyone has a source for "joystick" connectors instead of "serial" connectors, I would love to know.

 

On some DB9 connectors the metal part comes off pretty easily (indeed, I've had it come off when it wasn't supposed to).

 

Any computer supply store worth its sodium chloride should have both versions (with ears and the Van Gough models). I picked some up a while back for a project I haven't quite gotten to because of the threat of moving over the summer. :roll: I will post some pix of these later today when I finish cleaning up my work area downstairs (assuming I find them :P ).

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Is this what you're looking for?

 

db9connectorft1.jpg

 

Exactly! Where does one acquire such a creature? Computer serial connectors, big ears and all, don't plug in nicely to game consoles... namely my 7800.

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Mouser.com

 

You'll need :

 

Socket - 207752-3 - $0.92

Cord Guard - 207753-1 - $1.76

Female Sockets - 66504-4 - $0.14 (Qty. 1-9 depending how many contacts you need)

Strain Relief - 61831-1 - $0.17

 

... and unless you like to swear a lot, get real pissed off, and waste a lot of crimp sockets, you'll need the proper crimp tool and die set for the female sockets (anywhere from $120 - $300 depending on quality) and a crimp tool and die for the strain relief (depending on what tool you get for the sockets, you may be able to use those and just get the die set for this). So realistically unless you plan on using these a lot in order to justify the tool cost, you're better off getting Genesis cords and using those. Fortunately for me, I was was able to get the necessary tools free from work! :twisted: Not to mention I use these a lot so even if I had to purchase them I would have.

 

On a side note these connectors are actually smaller overall dimensionally, when compared to standard Atari/Sega connectors. And when they're new and smooth, and the sockets aren't all jacked up from years of use/abuse, they plug in, and pull out, of controller ports on consoles so smoothly and easily. :)

Edited by doubledown

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I go the genesis controller donor route or 9-pin extention cable. These solutions can usually be had for less then five dollars.

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Mouser.com

 

You'll need :

 

Socket - 207752-3 - $0.92

Cord Guard - 207753-1 - $1.76

Female Sockets - 66504-4 - $0.14 (Qty. 1-9 depending how many contacts you need)

Strain Relief - 61831-1 - $0.17

 

... and unless you like to swear a lot, get real pissed off, and waste a lot of crimp sockets, you'll need the proper crimp tool and die set for the female sockets (anywhere from $120 - $300 depending on quality) and a crimp tool and die for the strain relief (depending on what tool you get for the sockets, you may be able to use those and just get the die set for this). So realistically unless you plan on using these a lot in order to justify the tool cost, you're better off getting Genesis cords and using those. Fortunately for me, I was was able to get the necessary tools free from work! :twisted: Not to mention I use these a lot so even if I had to purchase them I would have.

 

On a side note these connectors are actually smaller overall dimensionally, when compared to standard Atari/Sega connectors. And when they're new and smooth, and the sockets aren't all jacked up from years of use/abuse, they plug in, and pull out, of controller ports on consoles so smoothly and easily. :)

 

I was really liking the prices until I read the cost of the crimping tool... $20 - $50 is usually my limit for specialty crimping tools I'm not likely to use more than a couple times a year. :)

 

I guess Genesis extension cables are the way to go... though I do like swearing and getting pissed off. :ponder:

 

Slightly off topic... I went to your website and saw your Odyssey 2 and thought I'd show how I approached it. I had two O2's, one working with DB-9 controller ports, but broken controllers. One non-working with built-in controllers that were not broken.

 

I wanted my O2 to be compatible with 2600 controllers, so I used the cables from the broken controllers to make O2 to 2600 adapters, with DB-9 connectors from Radio Shack.

 

Then, I used the built in controllers from the broken O2 plus two broken 2600 controllers to make the O2 controllers 2600 compatible.

 

Edit: I forgot to add that I came up with idea only after DB-9 connectors with ears would not plug into my O2. :)

 

O2 with ports for removable controllers:

post-17553-1228582120_thumb.jpg

 

O2 to 2600 adapters:

post-17553-1228582133_thumb.jpg

 

2600 compatible O2 controllers:

post-17553-1228582146_thumb.jpg

Edited by aftermac

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Here's the ones I use. $1.09, total. Any computer store with a good selection of parts should have something similar.

post-4615-1228585632_thumb.jpg

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Here's the ones I use. $1.09, total. Any computer store with a good selection of parts should have something similar.

 

That is the female version of what I have on my O2 to 2600 adapter in my last post. The problem is that they are too big to plug into my O2 or 7800.

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Here's the ones I use. $1.09, total. Any computer store with a good selection of parts should have something similar.

 

These plugs will work on the 7800. I had to do some extensive filing to thin out the plastic on both the side and end of the plastic housing (see pic). Alternately, you can cut off the plastic tabs (ones i filed) altogether and countersink the metal tabs on the connector so that you can put flat head screws through to hold the connector in the plastic housing. I don't have a picture of that but I have done it.

post-11435-1228598195_thumb.jpg

The metal housing on the connector body is actually 2 shells that are rivetted at the screw holes. By drilling the holes oversize, the shells come apart and the plastic header is free. Once you solder your wires to this and verify your connections, make a plug body by using masking tape to make a form that you fill with epoxy to make a plug. This looks gory but works for very tight situations like the vectrex.

 

BAH

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