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Multijointed Monster Maker

Is it possible? (Gunstar Heroes on Super Nintendo)

  

10 members have voted

  1. 1. Is it possible?

    • Yes, I have programming experience.
      4
    • No, I have programming experience.
      3
    • No, I repeat whatever people tell me.
      3


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Another question. How the hell did the old myth that the Super Nintendo cpu was slower than the Atari 2600 happen in the first place, and why do so many keep people beleiving it after they've been proven wrong over and over again?

Edited by Multijointed Monster Maker
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Are you sure you've heard that myth? I've read about the SNES CPU being slower than the Genesis, which as far as I know is in fact true. No way anyone was saying it's slower than an old system over a decade before its time.

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 I don't see why Gunstar Heroes couldn't be done on SNES, I mean, Jaleco had multi sprite bosses in their game Robo Warrior on the NES (just search Youtube for Robo Warrior and Snake boss, or just about any of the bosses when hit with a bomb reveal they are made up of many sprites working together).

 

I have an old issue of Gamefan where the president of Treasure stated that GH would not be possible on SNES or any other system due to the multi sprite enemies.  It can be done, just no one really tried.

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I'd tend to believe Treasure when they say it couldn't be done, since they've developed games for both systems. Having said that, Contra 3 isn't that far removed from Gunstar Heroes and has some of the same special effects.

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I'd tend to believe Treasure when they say it couldn't be done, since they've developed games for both systems. Having said that, Contra 3 isn't that far removed from Gunstar Heroes and has some of the same special effects.

 

Treasure hasn't developed anything for SNES. Some of their staff used to work for Konami, but mostly at minor positions. SNES can handle high action games, but Gunstar would probably have to be reworked to the SNES's strengths since most of them use tricks to play to the SNES's strengths.

Edited by BrianC
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Super Nintendo's CPU can't handle tons of moving sprites on-screen at once without tons of flicker and slowdown. Now, one system that COULD handle it is 7800. 7800 can handle up to 100 sprites on-screen without any problems.

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Super Nintendo's CPU can't handle tons of moving sprites on-screen at once without tons of flicker and slowdown. Now, one system that COULD handle it is 7800. 7800 can handle up to 100 sprites on-screen without any problems.

 

:? The SNES has more power than the 7800 in any way imaginable...

Edited by Wickeycolumbus

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Super Nintendo's CPU can't handle tons of moving sprites on-screen at once without tons of flicker and slowdown. Now, one system that COULD handle it is 7800. 7800 can handle up to 100 sprites on-screen without any problems.

 

:? The SNES has more power than the 7800 in any way imaginable...

 

 

... Except that SNES can't handle too many sprites onscreen at once, which is a huge factor in Gunstar Heroes. But other than that little detail, yeah, SNES is more powerful than 7800.

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Super Nintendo's CPU can't handle tons of moving sprites on-screen at once without tons of flicker and slowdown. Now, one system that COULD handle it is 7800. 7800 can handle up to 100 sprites on-screen without any problems.

 

:? The SNES has more power than the 7800 in any way imaginable...

 

 

... Except that SNES can't handle too many sprites onscreen at once, which is a huge factor in Gunstar Heroes. But other than that little detail, yeah, SNES is more powerful than 7800.

 

No, sorry. The SNES can do 128 64x64 pixel sprites per frame (up to 32 per line). That is without flicker.

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BTW, anybody still have that interview with Treasure?

 

Give me some time to dig it out but I have the issue of Gamefan where they interviewed the head of Treasure at the time and he made a lot of claims.

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Oddly enough, I am positive that the 2600 can create a decent version of the game. The 2600 can easily handle the vertical animation of the game.

 

The only shortcoming would be the 5-bit sound. However, some incredible music works have been created on the Atari.

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Sorry for the necromancy, but this a harder port than it looks. It's not the number of sprites - Nintendo's hardware has an advantage over Sega's in that department. And it's not the cpu clockspeed - the 68000 isn't the most efficient chip around, and it'd be a mistake to compare them on that number alone.

 

It's a lot of smaller things that add up to a death by a thousand paper cuts.

 

One of the Super Famicom's less known weaknesses is that you're limited in the sprite sizes you can choose from, and, even worse, you can only choose two sprite sizes at a time. This means that duplicating the all out sprite insanity of a Treasure game on any random frame will require you to either waste a lot of smaller sprites, or waste a lot of cpu resources dealing with pixels the player won't ever see or interact with.

 

Either one of which is a bad situation when you can only access the code controlling all of this between vblanks. And did I mention the sprite look-up tables are nowhere near as efficient as they are on Sega's hardware? And that's just the beginning of the brutal hazing that awaits you.

 

I'm not saying it couldn't be done. After all, I flunked junior high math enough times to confirm every stereotype about the non-coders who post here. And I am just repeating what I was told by a few people familiar with both systems, in ways that most went completely over my tiny little art major head. Slow DRAM look-up? 8-bit multiplication? Inflexible limitations on RAM allocation? 

 

How much of that is even relevant? It all kind of blurs together, and my best efforts to remember their exact opinions on the matter probably sounds close to how a hack television writer would fake technical knowledge about hacking.

 

But I do know that the sprites used in every SNES run and gun are a bit more carefully controlled compared to their Genesis counterparts. And it's probably not a coincidence that the games that best represent each system's personality are GunStar Heroes and Super Metroid.

 

So, is it really as hopeless as it looks on the surface? Or are there workarounds to all of these problems, like when Burger Becky somehow managed to port Out of This World to the SNES, using the slowest available ROM cart?

Edited by NinjaFlicker
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