Jump to content
Bones-69

RXB - Rich Extended Basic

Recommended Posts

6 hours ago, RXB said:

Just ran this program to test RXB version of CALL INIT vs XB version of CALL INIT

100 OPEN #1:"CLOCK"
110 INPUT #1:A$,B$,C$
120 PRINT A$,B$,C$
130 FOR L=1 TO 10000
140 CALL INIT
150 NEXT L
160 INPUT #1:A$,B$,C$
170 PRINT A$,B$,C$

Results:

RXB      =   17 minutes 42 seconds

XB 2.7   =  17 minutes 50 seconds

XB        =   20 minutes 6 seconds

TI Basic =  28 minutes 7 seconds

 

I was disappointed in only shaving off 8 seconds from XB 2.7 but I did smoke XB and TI Basic.

Then again I only did 10,000 passes to test it.

 

I don't understand your fixation on CALL INIT. True, RXB is 12% faster when doing a CALL INIT. I suppose whether this qualifies as "smoking" XB is a matter of semantics. 

In any case, CALL INIT is normally only done once in an XB program. In RXB it would take .106 seconds. In XB it would take .1206 seconds. The difference is 1/50 second. I am quite sure my gin addled reflexes could not detect the difference. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
53 minutes ago, senior_falcon said:

I don't understand your fixation on CALL INIT. True, RXB is 12% faster when doing a CALL INIT. I suppose whether this qualifies as "smoking" XB is a matter of semantics. 

In any case, CALL INIT is normally only done once in an XB program. In RXB it would take .106 seconds. In XB it would take .1206 seconds. The difference is 1/50 second. I am quite sure my gin addled reflexes could not detect the difference. 

Do I go attack you on any new improvement you make? What is it with you raining on my parade? This seems to be a habit with you!

Edited by RXB
missing text

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sorry - that was meant as an observation, not an attack. Nonetheless, your preoccupation with CALL INIT (mentioned in several other posts as well) seems odd. Especially when there are other improvements in RXB that (at least in my opinion) would be much more interesting to focus on. For example, your GCHAR can combine multiple GCHARs in a single statement.  Every CALL GCHAR that is eliminated saves about 1/50 of a second. Some programs use GCHAR a lot and it would be interesting to do a test  showing how much of a speed increase this could lead to. As I remember, you have combined KSCAN with JOYST, and a speed test of that change might be of use. And a bunch of others....

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, senior_falcon said:

Sorry - that was meant as an observation, not an attack. Nonetheless, your preoccupation with CALL INIT (mentioned in several other posts as well) seems odd. Especially when there are other improvements in RXB that (at least in my opinion) would be much more interesting to focus on. For example, your GCHAR can combine multiple GCHARs in a single statement.  Every CALL GCHAR that is eliminated saves about 1/50 of a second. Some programs use GCHAR a lot and it would be interesting to do a test  showing how much of a speed increase this could lead to. As I remember, you have combined KSCAN with JOYST, and a speed test of that change might be of use. And a bunch of others....

Thanks. Guess my interest in CALL INIT is based on what ever I can do to improve Assembly support.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ok I have given up on SIZE for SAMS cards.

Just like Floppy drives or Hard Drives or size of you SD Drives or USB drives the USER knows and making a program to figure out SAMS was just a waste of GPL space and time.

RXB does show what SAMS pages are being used and where everything is in memory.

          SIZE           command or subprogram                 PAGE  S5
          -------------------------------------------------------------
 
          Format         SIZE
 
                         CALL SIZE
 
          Description
 
          See EXTENDED BASIC MANUAL PAGE 169 for more data. 
          RXB has added many more features to SIZE. RXB shows the
          size and memory address of VDP, RAM and SAMS. Very uselful
          for XB or Assembly progammers. EXAMPLE:
 
          >SIZE                          
             11682 Bytes of Stack Free 
             24364 Bytes of Program    
             8192  Bytes of Assembly   
             * PAGE NUMBER = LOCATION *
             2     Page = >2000 - >2FFF
             3     Page = >3000 - >3FFF
             10    Page = >A000 - >AFFF                                                                                                                                                                    
             11    Page = >B000 - >BFFF
             12    Page = >C000 - >CFFF
             13    Page = >D000 - >DFFF
             14    Page = >E000 - >EFFF
             15    Page = >F000 - >FFFF
             * MEMORY UNUSED and FREE *
             >3739 VDP Free Address    
             >0958 VDP STACK Address   
             >FF6B Program Free Address
             >A040 Program End Address 
             >2000 RAM Free Address    
             >4000 RAM End Address 
 
            This shows normal XB values but also includes more
           useful things like Assembly free and SAMS pages 
           used and where these pages are. Lastly it shows
           VDP STACK location, First free VDP address, XB RAM
           First free address and End address. Lastly first
           free Assembly address and End address used. SAMS size is
           not reported just like Foppy size or hard drive is'nt!

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...