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I'm not sure where it leaves off, but I've been reading this book in my library called "The Ultimate History of Video Games". It was published in 2001, so it probably goes as far as the PS2, but a good read none the less.

 

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0761536434/ref=as_li_ss_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=atariage&linkCode=as2&camp=217145&creative=399369&creativeASIN=0761536434

 

(It looks like a kid's book, but it's ~650 pages)

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I'm not sure where it leaves off, but I've been reading this book in my library called "The Ultimate History of Video Games". It was published in 2001, so it probably goes as far as the PS2, but a good read none the less.

 

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0761536434/ref=as_li_ss_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=atariage&linkCode=as2&camp=217145&creative=399369&creativeASIN=0761536434

 

(It looks like a kid's book, but it's ~650 pages)

I have this book, really a great read. Goes all the way back to the beginnings of the industry.

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I really liked that book. It's an entertaining read.

 

I think I remember someone here mentioning there are some inaccuracies, but it's still an enjoyable read. I read it daily, until I was done.

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I really liked that book. It's an entertaining read.

 

I think I remember someone here mentioning there are some inaccuracies, but it's still an enjoyable read. I read it daily, until I was done.

 

Yah, that was me. There's a lot of inaccuracies in there. Stuff like claiming the Atari coin and consumer buildings were attached (for the whole "Stormtroopers have entered the building" thing) really stands out.

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I actually just checked your book out from my library! No idea you were a member hah. Awesome book I must say :-)

 

Cool--glad you liked it! My wife was at the University of Texas library a while back and saw my first book there. Nice to know that college kids today are getting a good education. ;)

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So many authors around here, and all suggested books are indeed really valuable and should be present on the shelf of any classic gaming lover!

 

IMHO, other books that shouldn't be missed are Tristan Donovan's "Replay" (which got lots of praises on the specialized press, and rightly so) and "High Score!" by Rusel deMaria and Johnny Wilson.

Hopefully, also my own work "The Golden Age of Video Games" , published earlier this year and which we are currently using in the game history classes at DigiPen with very good feedback from students so far, will be able to find some space in an already crowded shelf :)

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So many authors around here, and all suggested books are indeed really valuable and should be present on the shelf of any classic gaming lover!

 

IMHO, other books that shouldn't be missed are Tristan Donovan's "Replay" (which got lots of praises on the specialized press, and rightly so) and "High Score!" by Rusel deMaria and Johnny Wilson.

Hopefully, also my own work "The Golden Age of Video Games" , published earlier this year and which we are currently using in the game history classes at DigiPen with very good feedback from students so far, will be able to find some space in an already crowded shelf :)

 

Despite the resent surge in videogame books, it's nowhere near a crowded shelf when you compare it to other entertainment industries, such as music and movies. We're talking tens of books versus thousands.

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Hopefully, also my own work "The Golden Age of Video Games" , published earlier this year and which we are currently using in the game history classes at DigiPen with very good feedback from students so far, will be able to find some space in an already crowded shelf :)

 

Although I own it, I haven't read your book yet, Roberto. Right now I'm reading Harold Goldberg's "All Your Base Are Belong To Us" and unfortunately finding too many errors to make the book enjoyable.

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Although I own it, I haven't read your book yet, Roberto. Right now I'm reading Harold Goldberg's "All Your Base Are Belong To Us" and unfortunately finding too many errors to make the book enjoyable.

 

Mr. Herman, I'd definitely love to hear your feedback and criticisms on my book once you have to time to read it!

All best!

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I liked "Vintage Games" by Bill Loguidice and Matt Barton. It's more oriented towards historical trends in game design, than it is any of the personal or business history of the industry. IMO, that's the most interesting part.

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Are there any book that list all of the arcade games from the the 1970's through the mid to late 80's? It seems that the books I have heard of only cover the more well known games and not lesser known ones. I'm looking for only games that were in the arcades. It would be nice if this book exists and that it even covers tips on how to play the game.

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Are there any book that list all of the arcade games from the the 1970's through the mid to late 80's? It seems that the books I have heard of only cover the more well known games and not lesser known ones. I'm looking for only games that were in the arcades. It would be nice if this book exists and that it even covers tips on how to play the game.

 

Hi, as far as I know, the most complete book in terms of games is Bill Kurtz's "The Encyclopedia of Arcade Video Games" ( http://www.amazon.com/Encyclopedia-Arcade-Video-Schiffer-Collectors/dp/0764319256 ). Alternatively, you can check Van Burnam's Supercade or John sellers' "Arcade Fever".

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Thanks for the reply! I was considering getting that book but had heard of poor reviews that mentioned the photos in the book are of poor quality. But I think I'll order that book on Amazon, as I could overlook poor picture quality if the information is great.

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I'm not sure where it leaves off, but I've been reading this book in my library called "The Ultimate History of Video Games". It was published in 2001, so it probably goes as far as the PS2, but a good read none the less.

 

http://www.amazon.co...ASIN=0761536434

 

(It looks like a kid's book, but it's ~650 pages)

Is there some place that has pictures of the inside of the book? Like to proof read a few pages, but there is no inside look.

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Although I own it, I haven't read your book yet, Roberto. Right now I'm reading Harold Goldberg's "All Your Base Are Belong To Us" and unfortunately finding too many errors to make the book enjoyable.

 

I have to change my evaluation of Harold Goldberg's book. I had found eight major errors in the first 50 pages (and two I couldn't substantiate). However, in the following 150 pages I found only one minor error. The book is lively and turned out to be entertaining and informative.

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Although I own it, I haven't read your book yet, Roberto. Right now I'm reading Harold Goldberg's "All Your Base Are Belong To Us" and unfortunately finding too many errors to make the book enjoyable.

 

I have to change my evaluation of Harold Goldberg's book. I had found eight major errors in the first 50 pages (and two I couldn't substantiate). However, in the following 150 pages I found only one minor error. The book is lively and turned out to be entertaining and informative.

 

He's a pompous ass and he stole material off Ralph's computer without permission when he was at Ralph's place.

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Although I own it, I haven't read your book yet, Roberto. Right now I'm reading Harold Goldberg's "All Your Base Are Belong To Us" and unfortunately finding too many errors to make the book enjoyable.

 

I have to change my evaluation of Harold Goldberg's book. I had found eight major errors in the first 50 pages (and two I couldn't substantiate). However, in the following 150 pages I found only one minor error. The book is lively and turned out to be entertaining and informative.

 

He's a pompous ass and he stole material off Ralph's computer without permission when he was at Ralph's place.

 

Really? I was telling Ralph last week how I hated the book because of all the errors and Ralph said he enojyed it, and liked Goldberg.

 

He's not some relative of your's is he? :)

Edited by rolenta

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Although I own it, I haven't read your book yet, Roberto. Right now I'm reading Harold Goldberg's "All Your Base Are Belong To Us" and unfortunately finding too many errors to make the book enjoyable.

 

I have to change my evaluation of Harold Goldberg's book. I had found eight major errors in the first 50 pages (and two I couldn't substantiate). However, in the following 150 pages I found only one minor error. The book is lively and turned out to be entertaining and informative.

 

He's a pompous ass and he stole material off Ralph's computer without permission when he was at Ralph's place.

 

Really? I was telling Ralph last week how I hated the book because of all the errors and Ralph said he enojyed it, and liked Goldberg.

 

He's not some relative of your's is he? :)

 

Nope. Though he (Harold) joked about that during our brief exchange. It was brief because he booted myself and Loni from his facebook group after we called him on not getting permission for Loni's statements that he used. She never gave them to him or any of the other material but he readily claimed it didn't matter and he got it from Ralph. Ralph did not give him the material either and suspects Harold took it (personal emails between Ralph and Loni) off Ralph's mac when he was visiting. She's trying to launch a suit against the publisher over this, but Ralph doesn't want to be involved in any more lawsuits. Ralph goes back and forth on Harold, basically saying he seemed nice enough when he was in but their exchange was a one time thing.

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Although I own it, I haven't read your book yet, Roberto. Right now I'm reading Harold Goldberg's "All Your Base Are Belong To Us" and unfortunately finding too many errors to make the book enjoyable.

 

I have to change my evaluation of Harold Goldberg's book. I had found eight major errors in the first 50 pages (and two I couldn't substantiate). However, in the following 150 pages I found only one minor error. The book is lively and turned out to be entertaining and informative.

 

He's a pompous ass and he stole material off Ralph's computer without permission when he was at Ralph's place.

 

Really? I was telling Ralph last week how I hated the book because of all the errors and Ralph said he enojyed it, and liked Goldberg.

 

He's not some relative of your's is he? :)

 

Nope. Though he (Harold) joked about that during our brief exchange. It was brief because he booted myself and Loni from his facebook group after we called him on not getting permission for Loni's statements that he used. She never gave them to him or any of the other material but he readily claimed it didn't matter and he got it from Ralph. Ralph did not give him the material either and suspects Harold took it (personal emails between Ralph and Loni) off Ralph's mac when he was visiting. She's trying to launch a suit against the publisher over this, but Ralph doesn't want to be involved in any more lawsuits. Ralph goes back and forth on Harold, basically saying he seemed nice enough when he was in but their exchange was a one time thing.

 

Well where ever he got his information from, he sure didn't research it. My favorite part is when he talks about Atari's first appearance at Toy Fair. When was that? 1974 or 1975. He writes:

 

"Their space for Toy Fair wasn’t in the building at Broadway and Twenty-third Street where most business was done. It was far away (in the Jacob Javits Convention Center). Few stopped by."

 

The problem with this is that the Javits Convention Center didn't open until 1986. And to be really anal, the Toy Building is at 23rd and Fifth, not 23rd and Broadway. There's just no excuse for errors like this.

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I really liked that book. It's an entertaining read.

 

I think I remember someone here mentioning there are some inaccuracies, but it's still an enjoyable read. I read it daily, until I was done.

 

Yah, that was me. There's a lot of inaccuracies in there. Stuff like claiming the Atari coin and consumer buildings were attached (for the whole "Stormtroopers have entered the building" thing) really stands out.

You (and I think Curt) pointed out most of the errors in there on Atari stuff (and obviously most/all of that will be addressed accurately in your own books -and much more), but it makes me wonder how much else is wrong/missing for the other companies/events covered in that book. (many of which lack other published work on the subject, like the Atari stuff would if not for you and Curt -and those who have worked with you)

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