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leroyneiman

late 1970's & 1980's licence

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I'd also be partial to a "Perfect Strangers" game where you have to help Balki find his way from Mypos to Chicago to find Cousin Larry. :D

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Edited by AtariLeaf
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Video Etch A Sketch. You use both paddles to be the knobs for moving the stylus. The other two paddles you use to scroll through colors and the size of the stylus. There would be a variation where you just draw. It would be like Surround's video graffiti variation but with better graphics and more choices. There would also be a game mode where you trace a picture. Your score would be based on how fast you finished the picture, how often you had to go back over your own lines, how often you went out of the lines, and how far you went out of the lines. Basically the more accurate you trace the picture and the faster you do it the higher your score. There is a minimum score to move on to the next picture. If Atari made Rubik's Cube then why not Video Etch A Sketch?

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For etch a sketch the standard paddles wouldnt work because they don't turn continuously, just so far and then spring back.... the driving controllers tho, do they just turn and turn? never used them before, always wondered what made them so different from paddles... especially since the standard paddles handles much like a real steering wheel anyway, I never understood the need for 'driving' controllers.

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For etch a sketch the standard paddles wouldnt work because they don't turn continuously, just so far and then spring back.... the driving controllers tho, do they just turn and turn? never used them before, always wondered what made them so different from paddles... especially since the standard paddles handles much like a real steering wheel anyway, I never understood the need for 'driving' controllers.

 

Yes, the driving controllers are a full 360 turn.

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Video Etch A Sketch. You use both paddles to be the knobs for moving the stylus. The other two paddles you use to scroll through colors and the size of the stylus. There would be a variation where you just draw. It would be like Surround's video graffiti variation but with better graphics and more choices. There would also be a game mode where you trace a picture. Your score would be based on how fast you finished the picture, how often you had to go back over your own lines, how often you went out of the lines, and how far you went out of the lines. Basically the more accurate you trace the picture and the faster you do it the higher your score. There is a minimum score to move on to the next picture. If Atari made Rubik's Cube then why not Video Etch A Sketch?

That has already been done "Stell-a-Sketch" by Bob Colbert I believe back in the 90s. I asked if he could add driving controller support, and as far as I know at that time it was the only other 2600 program to use them. I think he had to pull the game for copyright reasons.

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Yes, the driving controllers are a full 360 turn.

 

So do they turn 360 then stop? or can you just say turn clockwise infinitely ala what an etch-a-sketch game would need? if so, that's hardly a driving controller, in context of name I mean, cause as I said, a steering wheel acts like the paddle does, turn so far one way, turn so far the other, or centered... what was it about Indy that required a different paddle setup, one that DOESN'T act like a steering wheel should... I'm bewildered

 

EDIT

And if the driving controllers can turn infinitely in either direction I assume that means they're not analogue, because I assume analogue must have some kind of max/min values for left & right to identify just how much you've turned the wheel..

Edited by Torr

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And if the driving controllers can turn infinitely in either direction I assume that means they're not analogue, because I assume analogue must have some kind of max/min values for left & right to identify just how much you've turned the wheel..

Yes, they turn continiously. I they generate what I believe is called "gray code" that reports digitally their position, maybe 16 steps, I forget.

http://www.atariage.com/2600/archives/schematics/Schematic_2600_Accessories_High.html has the pinout.

Looking at the pinout, there might be 4 possible signals combinations as you rotate it.

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Not to TOTALLY derail the thread, but what exactly made the driving controller any different than the joystick considering it seems to be a very limited digital controller? It seems like Indy 500 is just Combat's tank game with a track to maneuver and no guns. Combat controlled fine with a joystick, why not Indy 500?

Edited by Torr

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Not to TOTALLY derail the thread, but what exactly made the driving controller any different than the joystick considering it seems to be a very limited digital controller? It seems like Indy 500 is just Combat's tank game with a track to maneuver and no guns. Combat controlled fine with a joystick, why not Indy 500?

 

A) A joystick gives nowhere near the tactile response for turning that rotating a controller does. When you want the mechanics of steering, you don't use a joystick. When you need handheld digital internals but a rotational control that goes more than a single rotation (like a steering wheel), you have the driving controller they came up with. A combo of a digital stick and paddle controller.

 

B) The arcade versions of the game used a steering wheel, not a joystick. Most of the early games were ports of already existing Atari arcade games from the early through mid-70's. Indy 500 is a version of Indy 800.

 

This thread discusses the specifics in differences from a programming perspective.

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Thats all cool, I'm not dissin the driving controller (at least not intentionally), but it seems that even Combat could've made good use of them.

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Thats all cool, I'm not dissin the driving controller (at least not intentionally), but it seems that even Combat could've made good use of them.

I agree with that more than your previous statement about using joysticks for Indy 500. I love Indy 500, especially tag on ice. Doing donuts on a 2600, doesn't get much better than that.

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Video Etch A Sketch. You use both paddles to be the knobs for moving the stylus. The other two paddles you use to scroll through colors and the size of the stylus. There would be a variation where you just draw. It would be like Surround's video graffiti variation but with better graphics and more choices. There would also be a game mode where you trace a picture. Your score would be based on how fast you finished the picture, how often you had to go back over your own lines, how often you went out of the lines, and how far you went out of the lines. Basically the more accurate you trace the picture and the faster you do it the higher your score. There is a minimum score to move on to the next picture. If Atari made Rubik's Cube then why not Video Etch A Sketch?

That has already been done "Stell-a-Sketch" by Bob Colbert I believe back in the 90s. I asked if he could add driving controller support, and as far as I know at that time it was the only other 2600 program to use them. I think he had to pull the game for copyright reasons.

 

That's a cool title. There wouldn't have been copyright issues if Atari acquired a license though.

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Video Etch A Sketch. You use both paddles to be the knobs for moving the stylus. The other two paddles you use to scroll through colors and the size of the stylus. There would be a variation where you just draw. It would be like Surround's video graffiti variation but with better graphics and more choices. There would also be a game mode where you trace a picture. Your score would be based on how fast you finished the picture, how often you had to go back over your own lines, how often you went out of the lines, and how far you went out of the lines. Basically the more accurate you trace the picture and the faster you do it the higher your score. There is a minimum score to move on to the next picture. If Atari made Rubik's Cube then why not Video Etch A Sketch?

That has already been done "Stell-a-Sketch" by Bob Colbert I believe back in the 90s. I asked if he could add driving controller support, and as far as I know at that time it was the only other 2600 program to use them. I think he had to pull the game for copyright reasons.

 

That's a cool title. There wouldn't have been copyright issues if Atari acquired a license though.

 

Yes, like there currently is with Indy 500. We couldn't include it on the Flashbacks because of that.

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Video Etch A Sketch. You use both paddles to be the knobs for moving the stylus. The other two paddles you use to scroll through colors and the size of the stylus. There would be a variation where you just draw. It would be like Surround's video graffiti variation but with better graphics and more choices. There would also be a game mode where you trace a picture. Your score would be based on how fast you finished the picture, how often you had to go back over your own lines, how often you went out of the lines, and how far you went out of the lines. Basically the more accurate you trace the picture and the faster you do it the higher your score. There is a minimum score to move on to the next picture. If Atari made Rubik's Cube then why not Video Etch A Sketch?

That has already been done "Stell-a-Sketch" by Bob Colbert I believe back in the 90s. I asked if he could add driving controller support, and as far as I know at that time it was the only other 2600 program to use them. I think he had to pull the game for copyright reasons.

 

That's a cool title. There wouldn't have been copyright issues if Atari acquired a license though.

 

Yes, like there currently is with Indy 500. We couldn't include it on the Flashbacks because of that.

 

I'm confused. What does Indy 500 and the Flashbacks have to do with it?

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Video Etch A Sketch. You use both paddles to be the knobs for moving the stylus. The other two paddles you use to scroll through colors and the size of the stylus. There would be a variation where you just draw. It would be like Surround's video graffiti variation but with better graphics and more choices. There would also be a game mode where you trace a picture. Your score would be based on how fast you finished the picture, how often you had to go back over your own lines, how often you went out of the lines, and how far you went out of the lines. Basically the more accurate you trace the picture and the faster you do it the higher your score. There is a minimum score to move on to the next picture. If Atari made Rubik's Cube then why not Video Etch A Sketch?

That has already been done "Stell-a-Sketch" by Bob Colbert I believe back in the 90s. I asked if he could add driving controller support, and as far as I know at that time it was the only other 2600 program to use them. I think he had to pull the game for copyright reasons.

 

That's a cool title. There wouldn't have been copyright issues if Atari acquired a license though.

 

Yes, like there currently is with Indy 500. We couldn't include it on the Flashbacks because of that.

 

I'm confused. What does Indy 500 and the Flashbacks have to do with it?

 

The copyright issues you just brought up. We faced that exact issue with that title.

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Video Etch A Sketch. You use both paddles to be the knobs for moving the stylus. The other two paddles you use to scroll through colors and the size of the stylus. There would be a variation where you just draw. It would be like Surround's video graffiti variation but with better graphics and more choices. There would also be a game mode where you trace a picture. Your score would be based on how fast you finished the picture, how often you had to go back over your own lines, how often you went out of the lines, and how far you went out of the lines. Basically the more accurate you trace the picture and the faster you do it the higher your score. There is a minimum score to move on to the next picture. If Atari made Rubik's Cube then why not Video Etch A Sketch?

That has already been done "Stell-a-Sketch" by Bob Colbert I believe back in the 90s. I asked if he could add driving controller support, and as far as I know at that time it was the only other 2600 program to use them. I think he had to pull the game for copyright reasons.

 

That's a cool title. There wouldn't have been copyright issues if Atari acquired a license though.

 

Yes, like there currently is with Indy 500. We couldn't include it on the Flashbacks because of that.

 

I'm confused. What does Indy 500 and the Flashbacks have to do with it?

 

The copyright issues you just brought up. We faced that exact issue with that title.

 

The issue I brought up was if Atari had a license to Etch A Sketch then it would be on cart today like Indy 500.

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The issue I brought up was if Atari had a license to Etch A Sketch then it would be on cart today like Indy 500.

 

Which is the issue I was referring to as stated. Indy 500 was not originally licensed, they didn't have the rights to the name but used it anyways. Hence when we went to include the original game in the Flashback series we found the title name would have to be licensed. So it was decided not to include it. It can't be used again by Atari without actually licensing the name now.

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"Doctor Strange"

 

Dormammu (or the villain could vary by difficulty) is trying to break into the human dimension! Help the sorcerer supreme deflect his fireball attacks and save the Universe!

 

Ahh what could have been.

Edited by Ratty

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The issue I brought up was if Atari had a license to Etch A Sketch then it would be on cart today like Indy 500.

 

Which is the issue I was referring to as stated. Indy 500 was not originally licensed, they didn't have the rights to the name but used it anyways. Hence when we went to include the original game in the Flashback series we found the title name would have to be licensed. So it was decided not to include it. It can't be used again by Atari without actually licensing the name now.

 

Okay, I didn't comprehend you. When you said,"Yes, like there currently is with Indy 500." I thought you meant,"Yes, like the license Atari currently has with Indy 500." instead of,"Yes, like the copyright issues Atari currently has with Indy 500." I didn't know Atari didn't have the rights to Indy 500 and just used the title anyway.

 

If they didn't have a license for Indy 500 then why not use the Sears version Race for the Flashback or make a new one up like Hoosier 500?

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