Jump to content
carmel_andrews

Looks like someone just created a new GFX mode for the A8...

Recommended Posts

Linky only

 

 

 

http://translate.googleusercontent.com/translate_c?client=tmpg&depth=1&hl=pl&langpair=pl%7Cen&rurl=translate.google.com&u=http://atarionline.pl/forum/comments.php%3FDiscussionID%3D2251%26page%3D1&usg=ALkJrhi7BTxb2TzG6YfiuHpJQX8_N9tUGQ#Item_0

 

 

soz for the translate thing since I don't speak the lingo

 

Looks interesting, apparently a certain person here on AA was behind this new gfx mode (if you read the article/1st post)

 

Seems to be a prob with the download though, keep getting this msg in polish (guessing that it's an error or something)

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Its an effect seen when your ANTIC is warm enough so under emulation I'm not sure if the effect can be seen, one demo says the chips are not warm enough and to re run the init program to warm them.

 

The picture of the knight is nice tho...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Heres the English...

 

Here is a demo mode completed DGI and warming-measuring program DGF INIT. DGF is a whole family of modes based on the result of the delay function GTIA. I plan simple demo for other modes of this family. Knight In the demo, press 1 or 2 for the sub-images, 3 for both the interlace - DGI, 4 or 5 for DGX (DGI + tv interlace real Rybagsa).

CRT TV and S-video connection strongly recommended.

First you need to start and warm up DGF INIT layouts. Using the hair can be achieved already in 3 minutes.

Enclosed madsie source.

[edit] updated the files (2013-02-21). [/ edit]

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So what we need are thermostatically controlled heaters to put on the ANTIC and GTIA chips to bring them up to the required temperature immediately..

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Would like see a picture if someone could capture a good photo of it.

 

Ditto... no way I'm gonna start heating up chips to satisfy my passing curiosity about this... ;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I remember Rybags was trying to do this to get the effect, but I don't think he had any success at this. Supposedly it's meant to produce the HIP shift when mixing Graphics 9 with 11 amongst other things.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hmmm... that would be useful, but not if I have to train my wife's hair-dryer set to turbo onto the motherboard to get it going. :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I had no luck getting it working when I tried. That included leaving a 130XE running for about 40 hours as well as trying for an hour in front of an air heater.

 

Agreed on Metalguy's idea - some sort of direct method to induce heating is needed. Also more research to find if in fact this works on any chips or only certain batches.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My IDea was sarcasm.. Any graphics mode that requires the chips' physical termperature to be elevated higher than normal is kind of useless, don't you think?

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If it had worked with just the normal 45 minutes running then it'd be useful.

 

But needing to take extreme measures to have it work puts it into the interesting but not very usable basket.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Grilled GTIA mode, hilarious.... :D, on the other hand I have the right weather ingredients here in Canada to try my hands on Icicled GTIA mode, I really should give it a try...although I may have to move a bit further up-north to have it ON all the time :?

Edited by atari8warez

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If it had worked with just the normal 45 minutes running then it'd be useful.

 

But needing to take extreme measures to have it work puts it into the interesting but not very usable basket.

 

Here's an idea, why don't you just overvoltage the GTIA....then you'll have it overheating permanently :)

 

I've recently done this (by mistake of course) with my Cisco wireless adaptor. My USB hub (a cheap one of course) has a power adaptor connector but didn't come with one and I needed to power it externally to support many devices I had connected to it. While experimenting with my variable voltage power adapter I, by mistake fed 6.5 volt to the hub, that didn't go too well with my wireless adapter, it didn't die but started overheating at all times, and after it reaches a certain heat treshold it simply starts to mulfunction, so my solution was to strip it from its cover and attach a heat sink (a home made one of course) to keep it below frying heat levels.

 

Strangely its performance skyrocketed, it is much faster now, although I am not sure whether it is the heat sink acting as a supplementary antenna or the extra heat it generates that provides the extra performance. Still it maybe worthwhile trying this with GTIA ;)

 

In any case I now have a FrankenCiscoDaptor as a wireless device which incidentally also helps me heat my office...... :grin:

 

 

post-15627-0-07830100-1361493323_thumb.jpg

 

P.S: the heat sink is a bracket from an old PC enclosure

 

http://youtu.be/gCcmorqgvZU

 

Sorry, wasn't able to capture the smoke coming out of the adapter, ha ha....

Edited by atari8warez

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Here's an idea, why don't you just overvoltage the GTIA....then you'll have it overheating permanently :)

 

I've recently done this (by mistake of course) with my Cisco wireless adaptor. My USB hub (a cheap one of course) has a power adaptor connector but didn't come with one and I needed to power it externally to support many devices I had connected to it. While experimenting with my variable voltage power adapter I, by mistake fed 6.5 volt to the hub, that didn't go too well with my wireless adapter, it didn't die but started overheating at all times, and after it reaches a certain heat treshold it simply starts to mulfunction, so my solution was to strip it from its cover and attach a heat sink (a home made one of course) to keep it below frying heat levels.

 

Strangely its performance skyrocketed, it is much faster now, although I am not sure whether it is the heat sink acting as a supplementary antenna or the extra heat it generates that provides the extra performance. Still it maybe worthwhile trying this with GTIA ;)

 

In any case I now have a FrankenCiscoDaptor as a wireless device which incidentally also helps me heat my office...... :grin:

 

 

post-15627-0-07830100-1361493323_thumb.jpg

 

P.S: the heat sink is a bracket from an old PC enclosure

 

http://youtu.be/gCcmorqgvZU

 

Sorry, wasn't able to capture the smoke coming out of the adapter, ha ha....

 

if it does better this way, it is probably because the higher voltage allows a larger power output of the transmit side of the device, simple ohms law says so. this could decrease the error rate, which would make it seem as if the link is faster. Of course, at the same time, it is no good if it damages it.

Edited by Joey Z

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I put the information on this forum on 2012 Dec 20th.

Here it is: http://www.atariage....s/#entry2661408

Yesterday I simply updated the files on Polish forums (atarionline.pl and atari.org.pl). I just added 3 detectors and Bryan's VZI mode pictures (http://www.atariage.com/forums/topic/136706-internal-antic-and-gtia-schematics/page__st__100?do=findComment&comment=1677517). The description of entire DGF topic is coming soon.

Edited by pavros

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Interesting that some details are missing. Look at the wagon. On the right, just low of center there is a diagonal line to be seen on the nominal picture. The "heated" detail one lacks that line. ???

 

I will be laughing my ass off (in a good way), if it turns out that cooking the chip just right actually delivers. Peltier closed loop temperature control upgrade kit with new game!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

if it does better this way, it is probably because the higher voltage allows a larger power output of the transmit side of the device, simple ohms law says so. this could decrease the error rate, which would make it seem as if the link is faster. Of course, at the same time, it is no good if it damages it.

 

Well, after I put that heat sink the device no longer shuts off and keeps working so far without damage, will see how long it will last. The performance is still at levels I have never witnessed before. My router is downstairs and two rooms away and I am getting the same speed I was getting when I first tested my adapter in the same room only a few feet away from the router. I have a feeling that the heat sink also helps as an antenna.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Looking at the original link i referred to

 

It looks like you need a 'heat retainer or conductor' applied to said ship in order to elicit the desired effect

 

Since, merely applying additional heat to said chip won't do a jot, since as i understand it...a chip by it's own devices doesn't retain or conduct heat

 

2 heat retainers/conductors i know of are, hair (as mentioned in the link on post one) and glass

 

only thing is though, applying extra heat via this retainer/conductor and then tranferred or channeled back into said chip, won't that increase voltage levels on that chip (somewhat likened to how solar panels work)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...