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lapetino

Art of Atari - book in progress and need help

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Yeah I kinda remember an 8bit football cover now. It was the 8bit version with just the football right?

 

Donkey Kong I'd really like to see.

 

As a $250,000 auction I was disappointed and was expecting more final artwork. As an archive of historical memorabilia it is very interesting and one I very much want to see. The museum isn't far from here and I haven't been there yet.

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Yeah I kinda remember an 8bit football cover now. It was the 8bit version with just the football right?

 

Donkey Kong I'd really like to see.

 

As a $250,000 auction I was disappointed and was expecting more final artwork. As an archive of historical memorabilia it is very interesting and one I very much want to see. The museum isn't far from here and I haven't been there yet.

Yep, it was the 400/800 Football cover art.

 

Donkey Kong was cool as was DK Jr. It's a great collection. The Strong just announced the acquisition, and it still needs to be processed and cataloged, etc before it goes into the ICHEG collection. It's not yet available for public viewing -- I was able to see it all in relation to MOVA and the Art of Atari book I've been working on.

 

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I always appreciated the more understated art which used limited palettes. In particular, Grand Prix, Boxing, Barnstorming, Ice Hockey, Kaboom!, Pitfall, Skiing, Sky Jinks, Tennis, and the like. A simple drawing of what a screenshot would look like, add in some rainbows, and you have a unique look for the ages.

 

Edit: 100 posts!

Edited by Trooper Galactus

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I always appreciated the more understated art which used limited palettes. In particular, Grand Prix, Boxing, Barnstorming, Ice Hockey, Kaboom!, Pitfall, Skiing, Sky Jinks, Tennis, and the like. A simple drawing of what a screenshot would look like, add in some rainbows, and you have a unique look for the ages.

 

Edit: 100 posts!

Yes, I dig the Activision art too. It's not part of the book I'm working on, but it's a great series of pieces.

 

And that's cool that we're at 100+.

 

I should be able to announce some really official news some time in January. I want to say more, but I'm not allowed to get specific until then. But it's great news.

 

 

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I was referring to that having been my 100th post on Atari Age.

Ah congrats! This thread also just passed that mark too. Got it. Nice work!

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I should be able to announce some really official news some time in January. I want to say more, but I'm not allowed to get specific until then. But it's great news.

 

So how far into January do we have to wait for this news?

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Kind of late to the party here but I just wanted to say I'm really looking forward to this. The early Atari art, be it 2600 box illustrations or the epic arcade cabinet decor, had a huge influence on me growing up. To this day I still look to that art for inspiration and learn new things whenever I study it. I briefly looked into George Opperman's work a few years ago and sadly found very little information available. Having a single, concise source of information on this would be fantastic.

 

These artists helped lure us into buying and playing these games by creating worlds and images far beyond what the machines were capable of at the time. Worlds and images that persist many decades later. I think the games get all the credit now because for the first time in history the art was really interactive. YOU could control it onscreen. But it was all the printed stuff that helped get you there and completed the overall experience. Something that is easily forgotten with today's emulators.

 

What I also find intriguing was they were able to create these computer worlds all without the aid of computers. Paints, inks, pencils, paper, canvases and other traditional mediums were used to design and build what technology wasn't capable of yet. You really don't see much of that anymore.

 

Anyway, good luck with the book. I'll definitely be keeping an eye on this!

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Kind of late to the party here but I just wanted to say I'm really looking forward to this. The early Atari art, be it 2600 box illustrations or the epic arcade cabinet decor, had a huge influence on me growing up. To this day I still look to that art for inspiration and learn new things whenever I study it. I briefly looked into George Opperman's work a few years ago and sadly found very little information available. Having a single, concise source of information on this would be fantastic.

 

These artists helped lure us into buying and playing these games by creating worlds and images far beyond what the machines were capable of at the time. Worlds and images that persist many decades later. I think the games get all the credit now because for the first time in history the art was really interactive. YOU could control it onscreen. But it was all the printed stuff that helped get you there and completed the overall experience. Something that is easily forgotten with today's emulators.

 

What I also find intriguing was they were able to create these computer worlds all without the aid of computers. Paints, inks, pencils, paper, canvases and other traditional mediums were used to design and build what technology wasn't capable of yet. You really don't see much of that anymore.

 

Anyway, good luck with the book. I'll definitely be keeping an eye on this!

Well said! Thanks for the note, and I'm excited to share details as soon as we are allowed. :)

 

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I'm looking forward to your update! I've always been a big fan of the work of the Atari artists—just yesterday, I was singing their praises yet again right here on AtariAge—and the chance to hear the stories behind the artwork is very exciting.

 

I'm sure I'm not the first one to say this, but I really hope there's a possibility that we might be able to buy high-quality poster-sized prints of the classic Atari box art. I can't think of a better game room decoration!

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Hey, all.

Things are pretty nailed down, but in the midst of working hard on the book, I'm just waiting for the OK from our publisher's marketing department to be able to talk about the details publicly. As soon as I can, I'll spill all the beans! :)

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Hey, all.

 

Things are pretty nailed down, but in the midst of working hard on the book, I'm just waiting for the OK from our publisher's marketing department to be able to talk about the details publicly. As soon as I can, I'll spill all the beans! :)

 

I love this project - the artwork for the 20+ launch titles. . . man, that's some frame-worthy stuff.

 

Any updates?

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I love this project - the artwork for the 20+ launch titles. . . man, that's some frame-worthy stuff.

 

Any updates?

Thanks! Things are moving along, but I can't announce it all publicly. Waiting for the marketing folks to give the green light still. Hopefully soon.

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This book has been in the back of my mind forever now and I'm glad it's coming along still. Artwork of the 2600 games is part of the reason I started collecting them to begin with.

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Will have an official announcement TOMORROW. For real!

what time tomorrow :o .... exactly ....

 

/me sits @ edge of seat with baited breath

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(hand poised to write check...or swipe card...or pay somehow)

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Along with this USA TODAY article, I'm thrilled to finally make this official announcement -- finally.

THE ART OF ATARI will be published this fall by Dynamite Entertainment. With co-writer Robert V. Conte I'll be showcasing the artwork, design, illustration and industrial design of Atari and its classic games. This book will be the definite look at the creative culture and work of Atari. Now that it's officially out there, I will share some more stuff here with the community as soon as work on it slows a bit. Much more soon! Here's the early version of their promo site for the book: http://artofatari.com/

Thanks to you all for the support and help!

 

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Mobile site is meh, I can't view it on the PC right now.

 

I'm just anxious to get the book in my hands and it'll be just a little after birthday month so I know what I'm getting this year ;-)

Nice cover design, cool to see you got on USA Today! Congrats!

 

Did I mention that I'm really looking forward to this? =)

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