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sorry time to rant a bit.

 

OK - so I see flashback systems for EVERY system (dam there's probably one for the xbox6 & playsation 5!).

 

 

I may be the only person who doesn't give a CRAP about these CRAP systems... (IMHO - they are CRAP)

 

 

Atari flash back 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 - GOD how many can they make

Sega Genesis flash back 1 2 3 4

Intellivision 1 2 3 4

Colecovision 1 2 3 4 5 6 ..........

 

 

$40-50 bucks each..... you get the picture.....!

 

 

Yes if you don't have the games this is an easy way to get them...

 

 

But for me these 'retro' systems ARE JUST GARBAGE - IMHO.

 

 

SORRY FOR MY RANT - JUST GIVE ME GOOD GAMES (ON CART) TO PURCHASE)

 

 

Sigh - enjoy your retro systems!

Jeff31

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Most "good" games bitd were licensed IP. Thus all locensed plug n plays are lacking essential titles that every somewhat decent collection should have. No licesne agreement, well you can't include said game. Nintendo Minis are the exception because they retained the rights to all their best stuff.

 

These orphaned or abandoned IPs can often only be legally obtained secondhand. Licensing is often unobtainable for so many titles. It isn't like the music biz where you can sample anything from any studio with a standard contract. Music companies pat each other on the back sometimes because contracts profit both parties. Video games don't work that way.

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sorry time to rant a bit.

 

OK - so I see flashback systems for EVERY system (dam there's probably one for the xbox6 & playsation 5!).

 

 

I may be the only person who doesn't give a CRAP about these CRAP systems... (IMHO - they are CRAP)

 

 

Atari flash back 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 - GOD how many can they make

Sega Genesis flash back 1 2 3 4

Intellivision 1 2 3 4

Colecovision 1 2 3 4 5 6 ..........

 

 

$40-50 bucks each..... you get the picture.....!

 

 

Yes if you don't have the games this is an easy way to get them...

 

 

But for me these 'retro' systems ARE JUST GARBAGE - IMHO.

 

 

SORRY FOR MY RANT - JUST GIVE ME GOOD GAMES (ON CART) TO PURCHASE)

 

 

Sigh - enjoy your retro systems!

Jeff31

Intellivision Flashbacks are a good source for brand new Intellivision controllers. And those flashback controllers can be used with PCs, raspberry pi, and original Intellivision. The quality is similar to those Mattel made in 1981. More so than other video game systems its helpfull to have real Intellivision controllers to play a good number of Intellivision games.

 

Edit:

For other game system you're fine using alternative gamepads or joysticks. Alternative spinners and trackballs can be found. Other than Atari paddles and some Intellivision games are original/replica controllers required for any games. Are there any Coleco Vision games where you have to have that keypad controller?

Edited by mr_me
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Some people (like myself) have little time or money to go buying an old system that may not last much longer. Not only that but being limited to playing a system on an older TV also makes things more challenging. I would rather play on an HD TV with a great picture than deal with old technology that needs modded to work with today's technology. That's a choice, just like choosing not to purchase a flashback system. I agree it sucks that all the games you want are not included. To me these systems are getting better, especially with the inclusion of an SD card slot and HD hookups. Nintendo is evil because of their limited run of the mini and allowing consumers to mark them up for sale online. I have no doubt they will be doing it to the SNES mini. That's one flashback I won't even bother with!

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Intellivision Flashbacks are a good source for brand new Intellivision controllers. And those flashback controllers can be used with PCs, raspberry pi, and original Intellivision. The quality is similar to those Mattel made in 1981. More so than other video game systems its helpfull to have real Intellivision controllers to play a good number of Intellivision games.

 

I bought two INTV flashbacks. One I have hooked up to an old TV and another I got converted with a raspberry pi. I can play all of my favorite games at a fraction of the cost of a real system. It's a win-win situation!

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You could save even more money with an Intellivision Flashback and a Raspberry Pi without getting the conversion done.

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But for me these 'retro' systems ARE JUST GARBAGE - IMHO.

 

 

SORRY FOR MY RANT - JUST GIVE ME GOOD GAMES (ON CART) TO PURCHASE)

 

 

Sigh - enjoy your retro systems!

Jeff31

 

You sometimes have to put yourself in other people's shoes to understand why something might be of value versus of value specifically to you. In the case of plug and play TV games, it's a legal, inexpensive, no hassle, no-strings-attached way of re-experiencing some old games. Sure, WE can put up with the negatives (and of course, positives) of maintaining and collecting classic hardware and/or setting up our own emulation environments, but it's definitely not the path of least resistance nor is it something I would expect the average person to spend time/effort on. It would be the equivalent of asking me to perform maintenance on my own car. It's not something I have interest in expending any effort on, although I still want a way to get from point A to B under my own power.

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Are there any Coleco Vision games where you have to have that keypad controller?

 

Yes, absolutely. Miner 2049er, Quest for Quintana Roo, Spy Hunter(using standard controller), Gust Buster, Mouse Trap and Motocross Racer to name a few, all incorporate the use of the keypad for game play. Not to mention, quite a few games require it in order to select a Skill Level. Some games can be paused with it. Without a keypad or keypad controller, you wouldn't be having much fun with a Colecovision.

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With emulation its not a problem mapping gamepad buttons to keypad functions. Most gamepads have at least four buttons so a game like Mouse Trap is not a problem. If you're in front of a TV you can use a wireless keyboard to start games. Some games like Quest for Quintana Roo and Gateway to Aphshai might be better with the actual keypad controller and overlay.

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With emulation its not a problem mapping gamepad buttons to keypad functions. Most gamepads have at least four buttons so a game like Mouse Trap is not a problem. If you're in front of a TV you can use a wireless keyboard to start games. Some games like Quest for Quintana Roo and Gateway to Aphshai might be better with the actual keypad controller and overlay.

Sounds like a nightmare to map keypad functions to a standard controller on a per game basis. The keyboard may not be readily accessible during the action.

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Only a few games would require it. The idea is that the keyboard is not used for gameplay only for game startup, but you could certainly map more gamepad buttons to more keypad functions to eliminate the keyboard if you want. It only has to be setup once.

Edited by mr_me
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You sometimes have to put yourself in other people's shoes to understand why something might be of value versus of value specifically to you. In the case of plug and play TV games, it's a legal, inexpensive, no hassle, no-strings-attached way of re-experiencing some old games. Sure, WE can put up with the negatives (and of course, positives) of maintaining and collecting classic hardware and/or setting up our own emulation environments, but it's definitely not the path of least resistance nor is it something I would expect the average person to spend time/effort on. It would be the equivalent of asking me to perform maintenance on my own car. It's not something I have interest in expending any effort on, although I still want a way to get from point A to B under my own power.

 

 

 

Bill - Yes I agree. Like I said... I was just ranting to me they are not worth buying.

 

IF YOU WANT TO GET INTO CLASSIC GAMING - these systems are the way to go.

 

With the next step being a 'flash'? cart system - then actual games.

 

 

 

Jeff

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With the next step being a 'flash'? cart system - then actual games.

 

 

 

Jeff

 

I disagree on this last point. Other than ritual and taking up more space, I don't see a real distinction between "actual games" and flash carts. I think the END point is flash carts for a lot of us, not the other way around. Considering how much stuff I have at this point, adding more clutter is not all that appealing to me anymore. I actually like the option of eventually getting rid of my countless thousands of boxed games and instead using a single flash cart per computer or videogame system to meet almost all of my needs.

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If more websites would offer legal public domain rom images and legal pay per download commercial rom images, then this would be popular with many collectors.

 

One or a few cartridges is a big space saver, saves wear and tear on the cartridge slot, and it’s nice to have all or most cartridge rom images running from one cartridge. However, the USB flash cartridges like the ATARIMAX 128-in-1 model for both the ColecoVision/ADAM system and the ATARI 5200 system only work with up to 32KB rom images (All of the games released in the 20th Century were no larger than 32KB for those systems). ATARIMAX came out with an Ultimate SD Wafer Drive (also called Ultimate SD Multi-Cart on the older label design) that uses up to 32GB SDHC media to store rom images up to 4MB in size and with the option of game developers making a game that is up to 32GB size if the game does multiply loads to the 4MB of on board memory (With this design every game every made so far can fit on a under $10 SD card very easily).

 

I heard there are various other companies making SD cartridges for other systems like the ATARI 2600 system, however so far I have not purchased it yet. Most the latest cartridge designs are getting away from USB flash cartridge designs and using SD or microSD cards instead. One of the reasons for SD cards is so that the cartridge is 100% compatible with any computer, portable device, and operating system. The ATARIMAX 128-in-1 USB flash cartridges only worked with Windows computers.

 

Does anyone maintain a list of all the different companies that are making SD cartridges for the several different videogame systems? There must be some videogame systems and computer systems that do not have any type of flash USB cartridge or SD type cartridge. Of course most people do not need a cartridge and they can download the rom images to a Windows emulator on their PC or portable device.

Edited by HDTV1080P

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I'd say the vast majority of computers and consoles ever made have some type of flash-based or flash-like device available for it, or at least a multi-cart. Many of the ones that don't at least have something or another in the planning stages.

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Does anyone maintain a list of all the different companies that are making SD cartridges for the several different videogame systems? There must be some videogame systems and computer systems that do not have any type of flash USB cartridge or SD type cartridge.

This is the list you seek

http://atariage.com/forums/topic/127752-flashcart-and-multicart-list-all-systems/

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That’s an awesome list, thanks. The list does need to be updated to include the New Harmony Encore for the Atari 2600. The Harmony Encore supports games up to 512k bytes, which means in theory 100% compatibility with all Atari 2600 rom images including the high-end Supercharger games. Perhaps in the future I might buy the Harmony Encore for my Coleco Expansion module #1 Atari 2600 adapter.

 

Is there also a list of Windows emulators for classic videogame systems and computer systems? So far I have only used ColecoVision/ADAM emulators, but one day in my free time might try a Atari 2600 and other emulators.

Edited by HDTV1080P

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I disagree on this last point. Other than ritual and taking up more space, I don't see a real distinction between "actual games" and flash carts. I think the END point is flash carts for a lot of us, not the other way around. Considering how much stuff I have at this point, adding more clutter is not all that appealing to me anymore. I actually like the option of eventually getting rid of my countless thousands of boxed games and instead using a single flash cart per computer or videogame system to meet almost all of my needs.

 

 

OK Bill ya got me there - I have WAY to much stuff also.. :grin:

 

Jeff31

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