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I did got a PC-engine with the back cover.. but it's much easier for it to go missing... plus, expansions in Japan were more common so it's less surprising.

It's still a nice thing to get one.

 

There are a couple of tabs, inside on the bottom, on the turbografx cover also that hold it on. they can easily break off and then it no longer stays in place. probably another reason a lot got thrown away.

 

There are quite a few pics from different angles on this auction:

http://www.ebay.com/itm/TurboGrafx-16-Black-Console-Only-Does-Not-Read-Games-For-Parts-or-Repair-/281918350628

Edited by mickcris

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It's very interesting... It really feels liek they took the design of the PC-Engine and just added two large slabs on the side.

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It's very interesting... It really feels liek they took the design of the PC-Engine and just added two large slabs on the side.

 

it does resemble the head of a hammer head shark. :) They may have possibly planned on using the same peripherals at one point during the design. Cant really think of any other reason why the back molding of the case would be the same.

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I guess. And the crudely added piece of metal was probably added even later to prevent the use of imported Japanese add-ons. That's the only reason I see for them to use a piece of metal affixed with Philips screws. It's a poor design choice... unless someone was unsure of using Japanese accessories... and finally decided on a negative answer, mere weeks before the launch.

 

I'm pretty sure that if the Turbografx had made better in the US you'd had find back plates with a square form factor to fir Japanese accessories.

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No white Tennokoe, it is probably the lightning that makes that grey Tennokoe2 looks white. Same thing with black and blue vs gold and white dress last year.

 

And dike/dyke is pretty old term, last time I heard it used it was for underground vertical lava pipe (usually in cracks or gaps) that comes to an end and solidify. It's different from volcano that pumps lava above ground.

Lava pipes? LOL. And yes, I remember the black/blue, white/gold dress controversy last year. Apparently, there were never any photos of someone actually modelling the dress, so it looked like a poor lighting issue to me. Placing a blue filter over a camera lens would definitely make silver and gold look like black and blue. And while it's plausible the Tennokoe II may be in between the white of the PC Engine and the dark gray of the US Turbografx (potentially matching the Coregrafx), it would be hard for the contrast to look that strong. The red print on the PC Engine and the orange print on the Turbografx look accurate.

 

= = = = = = = =

 

I may have to get one of these babies. Going back to the Tennokoe II, what do you guys think the of the feasibility of adding a charge circuit to the AA battery bay to use with a pair of 2300mAH AA NMHi batteries?

 

'I|---o---I|I|---o---/\/\/\/--|<I--|<I--|<I---VCC

| |

[-] batt [+]

 

The diode bank would need a total Vdrop of ~2.2V (I suspect a yellow or amber LED might yield a suitable range) on a +5 VCC for 2.8V total charge circuit, and a series resistance to keep charge current small enough that it won't stress the power supply or overcharge the batteries. Assuming there is no current leakage in the diode bank (LEDs would need to be tested both ways with a multimeter as they tend to be less "ideal" compared to silicone diodes), this would probably give well over 6 months data retention without plugging in the console. The batteries would never fully drain and last a very long time even with frequent use.

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There are a couple of tabs, inside on the bottom, on the turbografx cover also that hold it on. they can easily break off and then it no longer stays in place. probably another reason a lot got thrown away.

 

it does resemble the head of a hammer head shark. :) They may have possibly planned on using the same peripherals at one point during the design. Cant really think of any other reason why the back molding of the case would be the same.

 

Yep. The tabs on my cover just simply broke off in 2015. It's weird though. I kinda like the system better without the cover. Or I could have drilled it out to fit the Etsy Turbo Booster but it's a moot point as the cover won't stay on anymore. The curvature on the back end cover never did look right, but neither does the square appendage of the naked US Turbografx. If I do decide to buy a Tennokoe II, I'll probably sell the Etsy plug to some lucky AtariAge member. I would want it to have a good home to someone who would use it.

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Lava pipes? LOL.

I thought it was more of a commonly used term or I would not have used it since it seems to have started a tangent. Must just be due to the industry I work in but its what pretty much everyone calls wire cutters.

 

This is from that wikepedia page linked earlier:

Diags or Dikes (a portmanteau of "Diagonal CutterS" is pronounced "dikes") – as in the phrase "a pair of dikes" or "hand me those dikes" – is jargon used especially in the electrical industry, to describe diagonal pliers. Dike can also be used as a verb, such as in the idiom "when in doubt, dike it out".

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I thought it was more of a commonly used term or I would not have used it since it seems to have started a tangent. Must just be due to the industry I work in but its what pretty much everyone calls wire cutters.

 

This is from that wikepedia page linked earlier:

Diags or Dikes (a portmanteau of "Diagonal CutterS" is pronounced "dikes") – as in the phrase "a pair of dikes" or "hand me those dikes" – is jargon used especially in the electrical industry, to describe diagonal pliers. Dike can also be used as a verb, such as in the idiom "when in doubt, dike it out".

Don't worry about it. I've never heard the term used before. I just call them wire cutters.

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Lava pipes? LOL. And yes, I remember the black/blue, white/gold dress controversy last year. Apparently, there were never any photos of someone actually modelling the dress, so it looked like a poor lighting issue to me. Placing a blue filter over a camera lens would definitely make silver and gold look like black and blue. And while it's plausible the Tennokoe II may be in between the white of the PC Engine and the dark gray of the US Turbografx (potentially matching the Coregrafx), it would be hard for the contrast to look that strong. The red print on the PC Engine and the orange print on the Turbografx look accurate.

 

= = = = = = = =

 

I may have to get one of these babies. Going back to the Tennokoe II, what do you guys think the of the feasibility of adding a charge circuit to the AA battery bay to use with a pair of 2300mAH AA NMHi batteries?

'I|---o---I|I|---o---/\/\/\/--|<I--|<I--|<I---VCC
       |            |
      [-] batt  [+]

The diode bank would need a total Vdrop of ~2.2V (I suspect a yellow or amber LED might yield a suitable range) on a +5 VCC for 2.8V total charge circuit, and a series resistance to keep charge current small enough that it won't stress the power supply or overcharge the batteries. Assuming there is no current leakage in the diode bank (LEDs would need to be tested both ways with a multimeter as they tend to be less "ideal" compared to silicone diodes), this would probably give well over 6 months data retention without plugging in the console. The batteries would never fully drain and last a very long time even with frequent use.

 

Or you could replace the SRAM chip with a FRAM or NVRAM chip. There are only 2 lines from HuC6201 chip inside Tennokoe2 to battery circuit. One goes through a transistor to the SRAM chip, I think it's like a switch to enable or disable the use if the battery is low or missing, it can be bypassed with a jumper. Another goes to a different transistor and I believe if you removed it and put that one pin permanently to ground, Tennokoe will always work without battery.

 

FRAM is like $20 and comes at no smaller than 8kx8 so you would need to fix a few extra address lines to ground to lock it as 2k SRAM. But 150 years data retention is hard to beat!

 

Someone has posted detailed pinout of the chip on PCFx forum and was planning to shoehorn a save RAM inside Turboexpress. It's pretty small inside and not enough room for extra battery or 2 so FRAM would probably work well inside that.

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Or you could replace the SRAM chip with a FRAM or NVRAM chip. There are only 2 lines from HuC6201 chip inside Tennokoe2 to battery circuit. One goes through a transistor to the SRAM chip, I think it's like a switch to enable or disable the use if the battery is low or missing, it can be bypassed with a jumper. Another goes to a different transistor and I believe if you removed it and put that one pin permanently to ground, Tennokoe will always work without battery.

 

FRAM is like $20 and comes at no smaller than 8kx8 so you would need to fix a few extra address lines to ground to lock it as 2k SRAM. But 150 years data retention is hard to beat!

 

Someone has posted detailed pinout of the chip on PCFx forum and was planning to shoehorn a save RAM inside Turboexpress. It's pretty small inside and not enough room for extra battery or 2 so FRAM would probably work well inside that.

Is FRAM what Sonic 3 used? The RAMTRON chip inside and nosave battery.

 

$20 is a bit steep. I assume they're that expensive only because they aren't manufactured anymore and new old stock is scarce.

 

My solution to not swapping the batteries would cost like 50 cents and just two solder points. 6 months is much better than the two weeks of the Turbo Booster, and you don't have to worry about leaky batteries with NMHi. Nothing worse than scraping 20 year old crusty batteries out of a secondhand device and toothbrushing the corrosion out with vinegar and elbow grease. Only issue would be if some poor sap down the road replaced the rechargeables with alkalines. They would probably explode eventually with continued use.

 

= = = = = = = =

 

Once as a teen, I trickle charged a completely dead 6V lantern battery off a "fresh" 6V sealed Lead Acid battery once by wiring them in parallel. Left them outside overnight and figured if it exploded, there would be nothing to damage or clean up. Next morning I put the "recharged" non-rechargeable lantern battery in a flashlight and it worked. I can't remember if it was an alkaline or carbon but I would never trust such a cell in a device I cared about. I also used to set button cells on top of 9 volts, plus to plus and minus to minus. After 10-15 minutes, the button cell would explode like an M80! :evil:

 

More info:

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Recharging_alkaline_batteries

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It's very interesting... It really feels liek they took the design of the PC-Engine and just added two large slabs on the side.

All of the TurboGrafx-16 hardware and accessories were designed and made in Japan, by the same people designing the PC Engine hardware.

 

While making the TG-16, they were also designing the SuperGrafx, which has the same T-shaped design. The TG-16 has the accents/details of the PC Engine and the body shape of the SuperGrafx. Even the name fits in with the PCE line.

 

People sometimes criticize the design and name of the TG-16 for being botched by "dumb Americans", but it is extremely faithful to the Japanese line.

 

The controller port size was a crucial upgrade, as the average North American game player would have constantly yanked them out and damaged the ports if they hadn't enlarged and strengthened them. I was really surprised when TTi didn't bother to upgrade the controller ports on the TurboDuo.

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Question everyone: I have a TurboDuo (US version) and I really think I am having an issue with the plug because there is a slight amount of what I would call "peeling" of the silver part of the plug that goes into the console.

 

In the past I would be able to adjust it so the power would come on but I think that time is pass and I am unable to get it running today.

 

I looked on eBay and most of the power bricks were in the $70.00+ range (!)

 

Can anyone point me to a cheaper alternative out there that works just as well?

 

Thanks!

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Question everyone: I have a TurboDuo (US version) and I really think I am having an issue with the plug because there is a slight amount of what I would call "peeling" of the silver part of the plug that goes into the console.

 

In the past I would be able to adjust it so the power would come on but I think that time is pass and I am unable to get it running today.

 

I looked on eBay and most of the power bricks were in the $70.00+ range (!)

 

Can anyone point me to a cheaper alternative out there that works just as well?

 

Thanks!

 

Some mod/repair guys make custom power supplies, but the TurboDuo is the same as the very common PC Engine Duo, so you can just use a power supply that works for them. Just makes sure that you don't buy one that is compatible for a PC Engine Duo R or RX. The connector for those is very thin.

 

http://www.ebay.com/sch/i.html?_from=R40&_sacat=0&_nkw=pc+engine+duo+ac&_sop=15

 

The ones for <$10 may not be great in the long run, but this NEC one has almost the same specs for $35:

 

http://www.ebay.com/itm/PC-Engine-DUO-Official-AC-Adapter-power-supply-AC-DC-PAD-125-JP-GAME-/161967217359?hash=item25b5ff9acf:g:FrQAAOSwGotWsZ6w

 

 

 

 

Yeah DIN connectors are indestructable. I'd like to imagine the hulk gaming on one. Bigger is better...

 

Bitd, my step sister walked across my TurboPad cable while I was playing and ripped the cord out, but the DIN plug remained in the TG-16. :P

Edited by Black_Tiger

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I can't believe people are paying that much just for the NEC brand name. Just use a Genesis Model 1 brick. They are exactly the same. Any 9V [-] barrel tip adapter rated for at least 850mA current draw will do. Better check the voltage and polarity with a multimeter. Some cheap unregulated adapters run a bit high on volts too. If it's 12V or more, better to be safe and don't use it.

 

Radio Shack can sell you a 9V adapter and tip for $20 if you're desparate. Check the polarity before you plug it in and put some electric tape on the tip so it doesn't get lost. A 9V [-] tip adapter will also work on a Famicom, NES, PC Engine, or Genesis.

 

NEVER use an original NES adapter as it is AC not DC and will damage the Turbo!!! :o

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I thought it was more of a commonly used term or I would not have used it since it seems to have started a tangent. Must just be due to the industry I work in but its what pretty much everyone calls wire cutters.

 

This is from that wikepedia page linked earlier:

Diags or Dikes (a portmanteau of "Diagonal CutterS" is pronounced "dikes") – as in the phrase "a pair of dikes" or "hand me those dikes" – is jargon used especially in the electrical industry, to describe diagonal pliers. Dike can also be used as a verb, such as in the idiom "when in doubt, dike it out".

 

It is an electrical thing for sure...the only person I ever heard use it like that is our local electrician, and he uses it SPECIFICALLY to see the looks on people's faces (hell he had to explain it to me that's for sure).

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In France it's just cutting pliers.

 

I can't believe people are paying that much just for the NEC brand name. Just use a Genesis Model 1 brick. They are exactly the same. Any 9V [-] barrel tip adapter rated for at least 850mA current draw will do. Better check the voltage and polarity with a multimeter. Some cheap unregulated adapters run a bit high on volts too. If it's 12V or more, better to be safe and don't use it.

 

Radio Shack can sell you a 9V adapter and tip for $20 if you're desparate. Check the polarity before you plug it in and put some electric tape on the tip so it doesn't get lost. A 9V [-] tip adapter will also work on a Famicom, NES, PC Engine, or Genesis.

 

NEVER use an original NES adapter as it is AC not DC and will damage the Turbo!!! :o

 

Unregulated power supplies will always send more volts than indicated, without load. It's why they are called unregulated, the output is not constant.

For example if you measure your original Atari 2600 or Genesis supplies, which are rated 9V, you'll likely find that they output 11/12V.

This voltage drops to 9/10V when the console is powered on.

 

Note that it doesn't matter much. Most console use a chip called the 7805 voltage regulator. This chip can take any voltage between 6V and 15V, so that's why you can see that consoles like the Twin Famicom take 7.5V, the Famicom 9V, the Megadrive 1 is 10V, and apparently some NEC PSU like on the picture are 12V. It's withinh the capabilities of the regulating chip (but of course, the more voltage you put in, the more it have to regulate, and the more likely it is to fry due to power surges).

It's why you should try to use 9V supplies, and regulated ones as well. You will NEVER damage a console by sending it a too low voltage. It the voltage is too low, the regulator wo'nt let the voltage go though, the console won't power on.

 

Any power supply that output 9V and a minimum of 850mA will do. It's not a bad idea to buy a regulated power supply, and even a switching one (unless you plan to plug it off after use, or if you use a power strip with a switch)

 

However, since you mention that your barrel tip lost the chrome layer, maybe clean the connector in the console. Your console failure might be dur to a peel of chrome shorting the connection inside. So your power supply mgiht be fine, and your console too, but there is that short-circuit inside.

Also, the chrome layer is there to protect the tip from oxydation. Try to clean the tip with a scratchy sponge and see if it works.

Edited by CatPix

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Question everyone: I have a TurboDuo (US version) and I really think I am having an issue with the plug because there is a slight amount of what I would call "peeling" of the silver part of the plug that goes into the console.

 

In the past I would be able to adjust it so the power would come on but I think that time is pass and I am unable to get it running today.

 

I looked on eBay and most of the power bricks were in the $70.00+ range (!)

 

Can anyone point me to a cheaper alternative out there that works just as well?

 

Thanks!

I posted this over at pcenginefx when someone asked this recently. You just need to get a supply that's center positive, around 9v, and 5.5x2.1mm tip:

http://www.ebay.com/itm/2A-AC-Converter-Adapter-for-9V-1-5A-Power-Supply-Charger-DC-5-5mm-x-2-1mm-US-/371135852564

 

http://www.ebay.com/itm/DC-Power-Plug-Jack-Change-Adapter-3-0x6-3mm-Male-to-2-1x5-5mm-Female-lot-/131665973582

 

The power supply is probably ok, but its a cheap Chinese one FYI.

 

 

 

Is FRAM what Sonic 3 used? The RAMTRON chip inside and nosave battery.

 

$20 is a bit steep. I assume they're that expensive only because they aren't manufactured anymore and new old stock is scarce.

 

My solution to not swapping the batteries would cost like 50 cents and just two solder points. 6 months is much better than the two weeks of the Turbo Booster, and you don't have to worry about leaky batteries with NMHi. Nothing worse than scraping 20 year old crusty batteries out of a secondhand device and toothbrushing the corrosion out with vinegar and elbow grease. Only issue would be if some poor sap down the road replaced the rechargeables with alkalines. They would probably explode eventually with continued use.

 

= = = = = = = =

 

Once as a teen, I trickle charged a completely dead 6V lantern battery off a "fresh" 6V sealed Lead Acid battery once by wiring them in parallel. Left them outside overnight and figured if it exploded, there would be nothing to damage or clean up. Next morning I put the "recharged" non-rechargeable lantern battery in a flashlight and it worked. I can't remember if it was an alkaline or carbon but I would never trust such a cell in a device I cared about. I also used to set button cells on top of 9 volts, plus to plus and minus to minus. After 10-15 minutes, the button cell would explode like an M80! :evil:

 

More info:

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Recharging_alkaline_batteries

 

are you suggesting this for the turbobooster or tennokoe 2? With the tennokoe 2, you could just put a couple eneloops in there and it should last a very long time. With the turbobooster, you can also put a larger supercap in it to hold data longer. Would be easier than redesigning the circuit. If you are just doing it for fun though, thats cool. Not really sure why you would want a save on Nutopia to last for over 6 months. I know i would forget where i was in the game. :)

Edited by mickcris

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I posted this over at pcenginefx when someone asked this recently. You just need to get a supply that's center positive, around 9v, and 5.5x2.1mm tip:

http://www.ebay.com/itm/2A-AC-Converter-Adapter-for-9V-1-5A-Power-Supply-Charger-DC-5-5mm-x-2-1mm-US-/371135852564

 

http://www.ebay.com/itm/DC-Power-Plug-Jack-Change-Adapter-3-0x6-3mm-Male-to-2-1x5-5mm-Female-lot-/131665973582

 

The power supply is probably ok, but its a cheap Chinese one FYI.

PC Engine is center negative. Either the nameplate was wrong otherwise I have no idea why the adapter would work. Regulators generally are designed to tolerate reverse voltage but you will get no power and potentially blow the regulating cap by hooking consoles up backwards. Atari Jaguars are known to fry with reverse polarity due to a non-standard regulation circuit.

 

Running a DC console on AC volts (NES stock power supply) is even worse and will place incredible stress on the 7805 regulator as it attempts to regulate the continuously variable signal to what essentially becomes a half-wave duty cycle clipped at 5 volts. This creates a great inrush current through the regulator 60 times per second as the 7805 pumps up 5 volts into the woefully inadequate regulating cap, which would not only create noise/interferance issues with the console's circuits due to transient voltage fluctuation on the bus, but likely result in premature failure of the regulator. If a filter cap exists pior to the regulator, it will act as a short to AC load. Some electrolytic caps may handle an AC load for a time, but will probably develop faults before long.

 

Look, I know people swear unregulated adapters work, and this is the case. For instance the popular Yobo 3-in-1 replacement is putting 14V open and 13V under load. Yes, the voltage droops a bit, but not enough. Sure you can power your console off 13V or more and it will run, but for how long? A year or more? Twenty years? My original stock NES adapter puts out 9.6V AC unloaded, and my other consoles 9V original stock DC adapters typically put out 10V unloaded. If it's too high and your console isn't pulling sufficient current, the voltage will not drop to 9V under load. The nameplates typical 850mA current draw is worst case; usually the consoles pull less than that in use, depending on a lot of factors including how much the software taxes the CPU/GPU and whether enhancement chips in the cartridge or peripherals are present.

 

 

are you suggesting this for the turbobooster or tennokoe 2? With the tennokoe 2, you could just put a couple eneloops in there and it should last a very long time. With the turbobooster, you can also put a larger supercap in it to hold data longer. Would be easier than redesigning the circuit. If you are just doing it for fun though, thats cool. Not really sure why you would want a save on Nutopia to last for over 6 months. I know i would forget where i was in the game. :)

Two weeks data retention on the Turbo Booster is IMO too short a length of time. I often leave consoles unplugged for longer than that. And it's not unfathomable that a person would want to retain save data or high scores for years or more. The trickle charge circuit I described would be safe for NMHi batteries and certainly isn't necessary. Alkalines have a bad reputation for leaking though and I tend to avoid their use in vintage electronics. A rechargeable battery will not leak if it sits discharged for long periods. Rechargeable NMHi batteries have about a six month power retention and can be charged a hundred times or so. The simple mod wouldn't hurt anything, although the low battery indicator will never come on during operation due to maintaining a minimum 2.8V on the battery bay. It also won't tell you if the rechargeables are past their life expectancy and unable to hold a charge.

 

Of course the trickle charge is unnecessary and you could easily just use stock alkalines and replace the batteries while the console is running to retain data if the batt indicator lights up. But if you don't use it for a long time, you risk corrosion from dead cells. Cleaning battery acid from old electronics is no fun but most of the time devices can be salvaged.

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That power supply I liked to and the adapter is correct. The duo is center positive. No one ever said to use an AC adapter. You keep posting about stuff that you have no clue what you are talking about.

 

I don't care what you do to your system concerning saves. I'm just saying that the tennokoe 2 saves would last a long time with 2 Eneloop rechargeables. You can also put a larger super cap in to make saves last longer than 2 weeks. Although I've never heard the 2 week thing or tested to see how long the stock super cap holds data.

Edited by mickcris

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That power supply I liked to and the adapter is correct. The duo is center positive. No one ever said to use an AC adapter. You keep posting about stuff that you have no clue what you are talking about.

My Turbografx has an OEM adapter with a center negative tip, says so on the brick.

9V DC [+]---(o---[-]

 

Although I used my Radioshack "frankendapter" with multiple tips to save wear on the originals. I assumed the "Duo" could use the same adapter as a Turbografx, just like the Sega Genesis and Sega CD and 32X shared the same plugs even if it needed multiple wall warts. Otherwise it was stupid for NEC to change the adapter spec, but they also made the controller plugs incompatible too among other things.

 

Pulled this off the internet. Why they changed the specs is just assinine.

 

B: AC Adaptor Ratings:

----------------------
DUO:
Input: 120V AC 60HZ 16W
Output: 10V DC 1000mA
Center plug is positive, the outer is negative.
Turbo Express:
Input: 120V AC 60HZ 13W
Output: 7V DC 700mA
Center plug is positive, the outer is negative.
TG-16:
Model: HES-ACA-01
Input: 120V AC 60HZ 15W
Output: 10.5V DC 730mA
Center plug is negative, the outer is positive.
TG+CD:
Model: HES-ACA-02
Input: 120V AC 60HZ 24W
Output: 11V DC 1.53A (1530 mA)
Center plug is negative, the outer is positive.
Model: HES-ACA-03
Input: 120V AC 60HZ 28W
Output: 11V DC 1.53A (1530 mA)
Center plug is negative, the outer is positive.

So the Duo pulls more juice because it has the added CDROM drive. I hope the TG-16 plug doesn't physically fit the Duo. :?

 

What AC plugs do the Japanese PC Engine, Coregrafx, and Duos use?

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My Turbografx has an OEM adapter with a center negative tip, says so on the brick.9V DC [+]---(o---[-]Although I used my Radioshack "frankendapter" with multiple tips to save wear on the originals. I assumed the "Duo" could use the same adapter as a Turbografx, just like the Sega Genesis and Sega CD and 32X shared the same plugs even if it needed multiple wall warts. Otherwise it was stupid for NEC to change the adapter spec, but they also made the controller plugs incompatible too among other things.

It's best to not assume if you don't know

 

http://www.gamesx.com/wiki/doku.php?id=repair:pcepowersupplies

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It's best to not assume if you don't know

 

http://www.gamesx.com/wiki/doku.php?id=repair:pcepowersupplies

Actually makes sense now. The units with the high mA adapters have a larger peg preventing insertion of the standard adapter. The plus tip are all 6mm or 3mm instead of 5.5, so no risk of plugging the wrong power supply.

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I don't care what you do to your system concerning saves. I'm just saying that the tennokoe 2 saves would last a long time with 2 Eneloop rechargeables. You can also put a larger super cap in to make saves last longer than 2 weeks. Although I've never heard the 2 week thing or tested to see how long the stock super cap holds data.

Or you could put saves on a Tennokoe card. Apparently those cards haven't failed yet, and they have 20 years old buttons cells inside. Replacing them now will give you a 20 years lifespan again (and another save support).

And as far as the super cap goes - I am part of a retrogaming club. The Duo R we had was last used at best (I wasn't there) up to July, where the club is closed because people wanna do something else.

I came back around that time, so since then, I had been there every day we gather together. I pulled the Duo from sleep in mid-October, and saves were still on it. So that's 3 months and a half of data save.

Of course, that's only valid for the Japanase Duo R at best. Us Turbos, and IFU-30 might use different parts (older SRAM in the IFU-30 might draw more current, for example).

Yet I have seen people complaining to lose saves after 2 weeks... IMO there is a serious failure if the saves doesn't last longer than a month.

Edited by CatPix

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craigm71, on 06 Feb 2016 - 1:02 PM, said:snapback.png

Question everyone: I have a TurboDuo (US version) and I really think I am having an issue with the plug because there is a slight amount of what I would call "peeling" of the silver part of the plug that goes into the console.

 

In the past I would be able to adjust it so the power would come on but I think that time is pass and I am unable to get it running today.

 

I looked on eBay and most of the power bricks were in the $70.00+ range (!)

 

Can anyone point me to a cheaper alternative out there that works just as well?

 

Thanks!

 

i forgot to say you need to order the plug adapter from the 2nd link, to turn the 5.5x2.1mm into a 6.3x3.0mm jack, as well as the power supply from the 1st link. so i'm re-posting this since i cannot edit.

 

I posted this over at pcenginefx when someone asked this recently. You just need to get a supply that's center positive, around 9v, and 5.5x2.1mm tip:

http://www.ebay.com/...S-/371135852564

http://www.ebay.com/...t-/131665973582

The power supply is probably ok, but its a cheap Chinese one FYI.

Edited by mickcris

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