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ChrisBushman

Looking for insight on Game Gear modding

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I have started doing some modding on my Game Gear about 2 months ago and its been pretty fun and exciting (successful LED backlight mod and battery replacement for the Powerback so far. WOOT!). I started looking into a 50hz/60hz mod for the GG VA1 board to play my PAL master system games on by following various posts switching the NTSC pin from the Sega 315-5535 to a 5V source. After going through the Service Manuals (http://gamesx.com/wiki/lib/exe/fetch.php?media=schematics:service_manual_-_game_gear_va1.pdf) and other posts, I am having a very silly issue: Where is Pin 118 on the Sega 315-5535 IC? I see some possible spots on the other side of the chip, but I don't want to start chopping leads before knowing exactly which pin I'm sending a 5V signal to. I'm modifying a USA VA1 837-9024 Game Gear board. Any and all help would be greatly appreciated. I've tried some other communities to find this information and I've found the AtariAge community to be very helpful in the past. Take care guys :)!

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pin 1 is usually marked with a dot on the chip and/or with an arrow on the PCB. On some large square chips, cut corner also can be pin 1. Then you count the pin counter-clockwise (or anti-clockwise for the non USA)

 

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Just to follow up in case some Internet lurker finds this post. I have since wired in a switch to interrupt GND and pin 118, thus allowing me to put a 5V + 10Kohm resistor on the switch and run carts as a PAL standard (aka, no weird cliches when playing PAL Master System carts on the Master Gear converter). I am a happy Game Gear player once again :)

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Glad you got it working. Sometimes guides are not 100% perfect, one needs to double check everything. Early on when I did some modding, there were times when the guide was wrong about one thing or only covered system variants that I didn't have and I've learned to research the exact system I have to figure out if it's different, and to look closely at any schematic for any oddities.

 

Plus 2 years in electronic repairs helped me a lot :D Well, it was more of big help in '90s when people still took TV and VCR in for repair. Nowday, they just throw it away and get a new one. Most of the LCD TV can be fixed if it's not cracked, it's almost always fried caps on power supply. DVD players are hardly worth it unless it was a good quality system with surround sound systems or a massive 300-in-1 DVD player I got for $10 (wouldn't read anything, kept rejecting disc cleaning after just a few seconds, had to really take it apart to find out the laser was a 6-packs a day smoker)

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