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Coleco Chameleon .... hardware speculations?

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i know the people who did this and i can say for certain that its just how they said it was, to just get a rip to california..the girl and the witness played in a band called teeth mountain. they had to make up something messed up enough so that they got on the show. i think this would certainly fit the bill as well.

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I am only going to comment in here about Sean at this point as I know others who have been scammed by him are reading this thread. Here is some more info I got from Greg Albright who has now remembered more about the case. All this is also public record if you know where to look.

 

________________________________________________________________________________________________

 

Here are several paragraphs from the opposition that I wrote:

 

This was not simply an isolated, one-time incident in which the defendant screwed up. The defendant’s convictions resulted from sophisticated confidence scams that stretched out over a period of nine months. His methods did not involve a single act of taking the victims’ money and running. The defendant actually communicated with each of his victims repeatedly, and either assured them that their merchandise was on its way, or he attempted to shift the blame to a fictitious company that he created to further his crimes. When the police were finally involved, numerous victims handed over dozens of pages of e-mail messages from the defendant, in which he continued to try to earn their trust by assuring them that he was a legitimate seller and by offering excuses that the delays were not his fault. It was defendant’s continuous and deliberate deception that made his victims experience ongoing frustration and suffering throughout that time.

 

The defendant’s criminal sophistication is clear. He chose many victims from out-of-state, which makes confrontation and prosecution difficult. He used his wife’s name on E-Bay to build up the positive feedback ratings on the site. He explained that the more positive rating a seller has, the better the chances are people will bid on their items. In other words, the more likely people will trust him and fall victim to his scam. He created false shipping companies, with false employees, and created false shipping invoices, all to convince the victims that he was a genuine seller, and to try to shift the blame for the victims’ losses on someone else. He even sent e-mails back and forth with a fictitious shipper, Brian Johnson from BJ Shipping. The police were unable to locate a business license or any other proof that BJ Shipping or Brian Johnson ever existed. The defendant had “Anonymizer” and a firewall installed on his computer to prevent others from finding out who he is and to keep victims from tracking him down. Anonymizer software allows the user to send emails and prevents the receiver from finding out where the messages were sent from. The only practical purpose is to disguise where the e-mails originated from, which no legitimate business would do.

 

The defendant’s basis for his motion is that he is a changed man who has been rehabilitated. But this court cannot ignore the fact that the defendant is a compulsive liar. He lied all throughout this case. He lied to his wife, over a period of two years, telling her that he was employed by Sprint. He got up every morning and pretended to go to a job he didn’t have. He lied to each of the victims, telling them that he was a legitimate businessman and that their merchandise was on its way. He told them that the problems were not his fault, and blamed them on a fictitious shipping company that he made up. He even had the audacity to accuse the victims of being unreasonable and threatened to sue one of the victims for defamation of character.

Once the defendant was arrested, he repeatedly lied to the police. During interrogation, he evaded responses with one lie after another. He initially told Detective Anderson that he worked for Sprint. When asked for some documentation of his employment, he said that he had no ID card. When asked for a pay stub, he said he did not keep them. He then said that he worked for Sprint part time, but had not worked in about a month. He finally acknowledged that he did not have a job with Sprint, and had not worked for two years. When the detectives asked him why he did not pay back one of the victims’ money, he said he tried to but the victim changed his e-mail address and would not return phone messages.

 

The defendant’s criminal sophistication and compulsive lying show that he is a man who cannot be trusted. His failure to fulfill his obligation of full restitution after representing to the court that he had already done so shows that he is just trying to manipulate his way out of trouble. Given that the defendant has been convicted of seven felony counts of grand theft, this court should hold him to his plea and deny his motion.

 

I am relieved to learn that you are filing a police report. The court granted his motion for expungement under the erroneous belief that the defendant had become “a changed man.” Clearly the judge was just one more person who fell victim to the defendant’s con game.

 

Gregory R. Albright

 

Deputy District Attorney

Grand Theft Auto Unit

Riverside Co. District Attorney's Office

 

_______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

 

Edited by Parrothead
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Gee, Mike, that's a whole lot of "I don't care".

 

How about something more relevant, like:

 

1) How did you not recognize a SNES flashcarts when you had reviewed the very same model not that long prior?

 

2) Why did you pay Sean when you didn't pay anyone else?

 

3) why was the toyfair Prototype shell black when every other shell used in this project was clear?

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Don't think anyone here is denying Sean has a very murky past, but the same goes with Retro VGS/Chameleon.

 

As you been trying to sell something for over a year that still hasn't seen the light of day, and quite a few capable people tried to help you such as Clay and Ketrvis

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And me.

 

Yes, after the RetroVGS/Indiegogo debacle, many people suggested different and better ways of doing business and how to move forward, which, if investigated and seriously mulled over, would have easily averted the Chameleon debacle. There still wouldn't be a console anytime soon, but there would be one less debacle.

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pretty foolish to be talking about legal proceedings here at this point mike. you dont know if that guy is reading this forum or what. you really should quit while you're relatively ahead and stop posting here altogether. but by all means, make it all about you some more.

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I am only going to comment in here about Sean at this point as I know others who have been scammed by him are reading this thread. Here is some more info I got from Greg Albright who has now remembered more about the case. All this is also public record if you know where to look.

 

________________________________________________________________________________________________

 

Here are several paragraphs from the opposition that I wrote:

 

This was not simply an isolated, one-time incident in which the defendant screwed up. The defendant’s convictions resulted from sophisticated confidence scams that stretched out over a period of nine months. His methods did not involve a single act of taking the victims’ money and running. The defendant actually communicated with each of his victims repeatedly, and either assured them that their merchandise was on its way, or he attempted to shift the blame to a fictitious company that he created to further his crimes. When the police were finally involved, numerous victims handed over dozens of pages of e-mail messages from the defendant, in which he continued to try to earn their trust by assuring them that he was a legitimate seller and by offering excuses that the delays were not his fault. It was defendant’s continuous and deliberate deception that made his victims experience ongoing frustration and suffering throughout that time.

 

The defendant’s criminal sophistication is clear. He chose many victims from out-of-state, which makes confrontation and prosecution difficult. He used his wife’s name on E-Bay to build up the positive feedback ratings on the site. He explained that the more positive rating a seller has, the better the chances are people will bid on their items. In other words, the more likely people will trust him and fall victim to his scam. He created false shipping companies, with false employees, and created false shipping invoices, all to convince the victims that he was a genuine seller, and to try to shift the blame for the victims’ losses on someone else. He even sent e-mails back and forth with a fictitious shipper, Brian Johnson from BJ Shipping. The police were unable to locate a business license or any other proof that BJ Shipping or Brian Johnson ever existed. The defendant had “Anonymizer” and a firewall installed on his computer to prevent others from finding out who he is and to keep victims from tracking him down. Anonymizer software allows the user to send emails and prevents the receiver from finding out where the messages were sent from. The only practical purpose is to disguise where the e-mails originated from, which no legitimate business would do.

 

The defendant’s basis for his motion is that he is a changed man who has been rehabilitated. But this court cannot ignore the fact that the defendant is a compulsive liar. He lied all throughout this case. He lied to his wife, over a period of two years, telling her that he was employed by Sprint. He got up every morning and pretended to go to a job he didn’t have. He lied to each of the victims, telling them that he was a legitimate businessman and that their merchandise was on its way. He told them that the problems were not his fault, and blamed them on a fictitious shipping company that he made up. He even had the audacity to accuse the victims of being unreasonable and threatened to sue one of the victims for defamation of character.

Once the defendant was arrested, he repeatedly lied to the police. During interrogation, he evaded responses with one lie after another. He initially told Detective Anderson that he worked for Sprint. When asked for some documentation of his employment, he said that he had no ID card. When asked for a pay stub, he said he did not keep them. He then said that he worked for Sprint part time, but had not worked in about a month. He finally acknowledged that he did not have a job with Sprint, and had not worked for two years. When the detectives asked him why he did not pay back one of the victims’ money, he said he tried to but the victim changed his e-mail address and would not return phone messages.

 

The defendant’s criminal sophistication and compulsive lying show that he is a man who cannot be trusted. His failure to fulfill his obligation of full restitution after representing to the court that he had already done so shows that he is just trying to manipulate his way out of trouble. Given that the defendant has been convicted of seven felony counts of grand theft, this court should hold him to his plea and deny his motion.

 

I am relieved to learn that you are filing a police report. The court granted his motion for expungement under the erroneous belief that the defendant had become “a changed man.” Clearly the judge was just one more person who fell victim to the defendant’s con game.

 

Gregory R. Albright

 

Deputy District Attorney

Grand Theft Auto Unit

Riverside Co. District Attorney's Office

 

_______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

 

Captured for posterity (albeit there was already an edit)

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I wonder what it would say on the court papers that would eventually be served to Mike?
Someone would sue him, no doubt about that.

Ah .... never mind:
The defendant’s criminal sophistication and compulsive lying show that he is a man who cannot be trusted.

It is interesting how Mike has become much combative about Sean now that he's got the short end of the stick but how dismissive he was of all the others he shafted ..... that Sawyer guy (interview here) wrt Retro Mag or GG itself, then I believe pipercub wrt pre RVGS IPs, I am kind of sure Carlsen did not enjoy his ride either .....

 

Well I do realize why Mike should pursue that avenue, but it should be clear someone else should pursue that same avenue with him and for basically the same reasons (lies, deceits, assets transfers etc...).

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All this is also public record if you know where to look.

 

________________________________________________________________________________________________

 

This was not simply an isolated, one-time incident in which he screwed up, He attempted to shift the blame to a fictitious company that he created. He continued to try to earn trust by assuring that he was a legitimate seller and by offering excuses that the delays were not his fault. It was his continuous and deliberate deception that made them experience ongoing frustration throughout that time.

 

The only practical purpose is to disguise, which no legitimate business would do.

 

The defendant’s basis for his motion is that he is a changed man who has been rehabilitated. But we cannot ignore the fact that he is a compulsive liar. He lied all throughout this. His compulsive lying show that he is a man who cannot be trusted. He is just trying to manipulate his way out of trouble.

_______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

 

 

A little editing on my part to emphasize the ironic bits.

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The funny thing is that, by laying out details of his legal ammunition here, Mike is only giving Sean Robinson the opportunity to gather all the evidence he'll need to turn many of these allegations—the lying, the blame-shifting, the financial shell games, etc—right back on Mike. After everything that's happened, including mainstream media coverage of this project from multiple sources, Sean will have an abundance of riches to choose from.

 

It's understandable that Mike should want to get his money back, but as Ian said during the most recent #CUPodcast segment: "Go ahead, get your money back. You won't get your reputation back."

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Gee, Mike, that's a whole lot of "I don't care".

 

How about something more relevant, like:

 

1) How did you not recognize a SNES flashcarts when you had reviewed the very same model not that long prior?

 

2) Why did you pay Sean when you didn't pay anyone else?

 

3) why was the toyfair Prototype shell black when every other shell used in this project was clear?

He was in on the scam. Simple as that.

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I believe the doc we are seeing was the opposition to the expungement motion that Albright wrote.

The expungement is wrt pre-existing cases, this CC mess is all new cannon fodder.

 

 

At any rate it does not explain why Mike wanted the BTBfilms guy to shot the video even with no proto ..... the BTBfilms guy had to refuse and pull out .... how bad is it when you try to make an accomplice out of a professional so bad so he prefers to part ways?!

What's Mike defense on this, Sean told me so?

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I believe the doc we are seeing was the opposition to the expungement motion that Albright wrote.

 

The expungement is wrt pre-existing cases, this CC mess is all new cannon fodder.

Cannon Fodder? This whole thing can be linked back to the Jag!

 

b_CannonFodder_front.jpg

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The funny thing is that, by laying out details of his legal argument here, Mike is only giving Sean Robinson the opportunity to gather all the evidence he'll need to turn many of these accusations—the lying, the blame-shifting, the financial shell games, etc—right back on Mike. After everything that's happened, including mainstream media coverage of this project from multiple sources, Sean will have an abundance of riches to choose from.

 

It's understandable that Mike should want to get his money back, but as Ian said during the most recent #CUPodcast segment: "Go ahead, get your money back. You won't get your reputation back."

 

Mike's biggest problem going into court to ask to get his money back for the fake prototypes is ... Mike. MK will have to prove he didn't know the prototypes were fake. That's hard when you consider that after the Toy Fair Mike paid Sean for a second prototype despite all the information that came out during the Toy Fair. At best it's, as was mentioned on the CUPodcast, willful ignorance. At worst, Mike looks like he's completely in on the scam.

 

If all the other Kickstarter shenanigans come out in court (like the previous IndieGoGo campaign, the Kickstarter video shoot, etc.) then the doctrine of unclean hands comes into play. Mike asking to get his money back for a fake prototype is like someone coming into court and complaining that a drug dealer sold him a bag of fake crack.

Edited by atm94404
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All this is also public record if you know where to look.

I don't know where to look. From where I sit, this stuff, quoted out of context, seems indistinguishable from you just trying to divert the attention from yourself. Got links?

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Mike, if you want to sue Sean, I'm willing to be your lawyer. Just send me $7000 and don't ask anything about my credentials.

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