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Keatah

When does your classic console become not worth repairing?

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When does your classic console become not worth repairing? Not economical to repair? What would be the dividing line and what would push it over the edge to the scrap & parts pile?

 

On the flipside, what are you willing to spend to keep it working? And how far would you go with repairs?

Edited by Keatah

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When it releases magic smoke from more than one places.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F-efQbRVZrs

 

I may still keep it for spare parts. I had a C64 board, somehow something happened and the PCB directly below PLA burned through, destroying multiple traces. C64 is rather common so I never tried to fix the PCB. I just removed all the surviving chips and right now I have an empty breadbin with keyboard and loose chips for spares.

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To those still proselytizing emulation - yeah, right. It *still* sucks. For game playing anyway.

 

I'm beyond pissed/disappointed at "the ultimate Amiga emulator" (UAE) as we speak. First time I've let a PeeCee running Windoze in my house in over 10 years… but anyway, surprised to hear such a remedial question asked by someone that already knows the answer. ;)

 

Osgeld nailed it. Either that, or if you're incapable of performing certain repairs that is.

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Put it this way, how far above replacement cost would spend on a sentimental machine? People with classic cars dump tons more money into them than they originally cost when new.

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Put it this way, how far above replacement cost would spend on a sentimental machine? People with classic cars dump tons more money into them than they originally cost when new.

 

Oh yeah... and nostalgia plays a huge role here too. I have one buddy recently involved in an accident that will and currently is, going out of his way to spend more money above and beyond what his insurance company is paying, just to keep his particular beater on the road. lol

 

All depends!

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To those still proselytizing emulation - yeah, right. It *still* sucks. For game playing anyway.

 

You need a good understanding of how emulation interacts with your host system. Otherwise yes, you'll get crap results.

 

 

I'm beyond pissed/disappointed at "the ultimate Amiga emulator" (UAE) as we speak.

 

The Amiga sucks so hard the funk it generates screws up the emulator.

 

 

but anyway… surprised to hear such a remedial question asked by someone that already knows the answer. OR guess by now, I should not be. ;)
It's only "remedial" if you're short on skills, thus getting stuck with repair by replacement. Otherwise a busted machine would be seen as a chance to open it up and complete a repair and restoration. Perhaps even adding an internal upgrade like an accelerator card while it's "in the shop"..

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Put it this way, how far above replacement cost would spend on a sentimental machine? People with classic cars dump tons more money into them than they originally cost when new.

Depends on what I could afford. For an example, I have the Atari 2600 that my dead uncle played on when he was in his twenties. If for some reason it eventually broke and for some reason it cost hundreds of dollars to fix then would I do it? Maybe. Thousands? Very Unlikely. The worst case scenario would be that I would just leave it broke but still keep it. I can't give an exact amount above replacement cost though.

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...Perhaps even adding an internal upgrade like an accelerator card while it's "in the shop"..

 

Oh believe me, I'm the kind of guy that likes to squeeze every bit of performance out of a given machine as I can. Currently have an overdrive chip that takes a G3 333mhz Mac to 1.1ghz. Which, reminds me, I should sell that soon before it becomes totally worthless. :lol:

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When the time invested and cost to repair outweighs what it is worth. Such as you have a $20 console, repair part cost $10 and an hour of your time to fix. Not happening. I think it basically boils down to what you consider your time is worth. I guess if it has sentimental value or something you don't mind investing the time in then that would be different.

 

However in general if the time invested plus parts required are more than it is worth, then it doesn't get fixed ... by me anyhow. They are good learning projects and such so yeah I do at times invest the time just for experience and knowledge if it is something I have not done before.

 

Your not going to see me cleaning controller contacts and buttons too much these days unless it is something like a jaguar pro :)

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Keep on keeping' on is the theme, but yeah... some stupidly wicked shit going on inside the Amiga for emulators to properly handle. :(

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When the home brew community is dead, or when the pricing of the home brews reach to extortion prices.

Thankfully the communities here that support the consoles I own don't do that. :thumbsup:

Edited by PhoenixMoonPatrol

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I generally go with when the cost to repair exceeds the cost to replace the unit in same or better condition, unless its economical to repair it just for fun as in the case of my Atari XEGS. I picked up the current one in box untested for cheap straight off the counter at RadioShack & found it was likely DOA when I removed it from storage a bit over a year later. I already "replaced" it with another unit for $50 as a placeholder until parts come in to fix the original I repair electronics & other things as a hobby so I don't count my time against the repair/replace calculations otherwise not much would be cost effective for repair.

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I've put maybe $10-$50 in parts into my Apple //e to date. Almost no time troubleshooting it. Most recent repair was changing a MT4164 RAM chip. I also had Compu-Shop change a 4116 DRAM in my II+ when I was a kid and didn't know anything because flight simulator A2-FS1 kept getting stuck in a Bermuda Triangle funk where time stopped. Both my original Disk II units had their pressure pads replaced and speeds adjusted, one for normal factory setting, the other a little bit slower for working with disk protection schemes. I also did recent PM on other parameters - no adjustments needed! Yay!

 

Since these machines have sentimental value I would still pay whatever it takes to keep them operational. Though I'm hesitant to place a value on time as I consider it a hobby. Fun. Relaxing.

Edited by Keatah
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When you cant figure out what is wrong and get so pissed off you make it not work permanitly.

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Most likely if the parts or repairs are more expensive than buying a new console. Had a PlayStation 1 that stopped spinning discs and replaced it for about 20 dollars. The one I have is still going 4 and a half years but I think I need to change out the laser.

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This kind of question is irrelevant when applied to a hobby. Everyone will have their own answer. Cost has almost no consideration in this context. If you are capable of fixing the thing and enjoy messing with it, then continue to do just that until you no longer get any enjoyment from the hobby. Then find someone else who does still enjoy the hobby and donate your gear to a good home. If you can't fix it, donate or sell it cheap to someone who can.

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This kind of question is irrelevant when applied to a hobby.

 

Not really. Because when you have a good understanding of whether (or not) to scrap something you eliminate a lot of frustration and dillydallying

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Put it this way, how far above replacement cost would spend on a sentimental machine? People with classic cars dump tons more money into them than they originally cost when new.

Yes, and people often pay $200 or more to get RGB or HDMI video out of $30 classic consoles. Or pay to have modchips installed for region free gaming, or 50/60Hz toggle switch, or who knows what else.

 

Then there are rare consoles like Turbo CD, et al, which are worth whatever costs/trouble it takes to get them recapped, and have that crusty yellow gear replaced.

 

And others, like the Famicom Disk System, simply aren't worth the effort of bungling around with.

 

When the repairs cost more than buying another one. Unless your current one holds some sentimental attachment compared to another one.

When the repairs cost more than buying another one, period lol

Sometimes mods can add functionality, and the added functionality is worth more than the base price of the console. And sometimes it's something simple, like replacing the RF cable to get clear signal.

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I have yet to figure out the whole RGB thing, thats a pile of cash to get marginally better image quality on a freaking 2600 or NES lol

 

and I mod my systems all the time, they are not expensive at all, its just most people are willing to instantly hand over a wad of cash to have 3$ worth of parts put into their machine

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When does your classic console become not worth repairing?

 

When what is required to repair it is more money, time, or effort than you wish to spend. ;)

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I have yet to figure out the whole RGB thing, thats a pile of cash to get marginally better image quality on a freaking 2600 or NES lol

 

and I mod my systems all the time, they are not expensive at all, its just most people are willing to instantly hand over a wad of cash to have 3$ worth of parts put into their machine

People are not paying a wad of money for $3 worth of parts. Which is low balling it, unless you are using the cheapest crap components possible and snot soldering the whole thing on a garbage non-plated prototype board.

 

I guess anybody can grab a woodworker, plumbers or other soldering iron they have lying around and hack a mod into a system. Maybe they will get lucky and it will work...sort of

 

What people pay for is a professionally made/installed mod with quality components and a PCB specifically for the mod (this generally throws your $3 figure out right there).

When I install a mod, I also check to make sure all the other components in the system are good, change out troublesome components (Like replacing the 7805 regulator in an Atari 2600 when installing a longhorn mod to a newer 1.5A regulator), make sure any field change orders are done, and professionally mount the mod to ensure it stays in place and remains cool.

The service is preformed in a static safe environment with the right tools for the job by somebody who understands the electronics/systems involved.

 

It is like saying anybody can cheaply spray paint their car verse's going to an automotive paint shop to have it done right.

 

In response to the OP: To me, generally a board becomes a donor when more then 2 traces are cut/lifted, unless it is part of a mod.

 

 

Edited by dreamwatcher
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