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TI-99 - DOCs, Manuals, eBooks, Lost & Found

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I can answer regarding the power connector at the end of your PDF that the pin numbers appear to be correct. The pin designated as pin 1 is NC. Also, the two voltages listed are not isolated. My transformer measured about 20VAC on pins 2 and 3, and about 9VAC on pins 3 and 4, which means it measured about 24VAC across pins 2 and 4 as you'd expect.

 

Of course AC voltages out of a transformer will vary somewhat. The transformer is rated as 110VAC input, and like as not I'd read 120VAC if I shoved probes into a socket. I don't do that as a general rule. ;) It's rated for a couple of volts lower, and I would be shocked if the TI's power supply circuit weren't rated 15-22VAC and 7-9VAC respectively. The two-pin QI model would do switching regulator magic to generate all three voltages from the single approximately 18VAC input.

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If I remember correctly, there are less than 25 of those cards out there. When Winfried was working on the original design, he was trying to figure out how to shoehorn the TE-II speech routines into it. I sent him a copy of the TI Text-to-Speech disk, which was much easier to adapt to it. . .and with that card in the PEB, you always have full access to the maximum capabilities of the Speech Synthesizer.

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If I remember correctly, there are less than 25 of those cards out there. When Winfried was working on the original design, he was trying to figure out how to shoehorn the TE-II speech routines into it. I sent him a copy of the TI Text-to-Speech disk, which was much easier to adapt to it. . .and with that card in the PEB, you always have full access to the maximum capabilities of the Speech Synthesizer.

 

 

For something that is just adapting into the PEB from a sidecar... just curious what all the extra chips are for. I mean, I wonder besides power regulation, if you had the passthrough speech synth connected to the same pins as the signals it was connect to on the side of the console, why the additional circuity is needed. I'm sure it serves some purpose... but am just morbidly curious. :)

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The double buffer isolation circuitry thing is what I'm curious about. If you throw a speech synth on a board just to put it in the PEB, and don't really add anything else, isn't it almost "ready to go" sans regulators? I mean, it was set up as a pass through bus already, so should already have some of those circuits on it. That's the part I'm trying to understand :-)

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The buffers shield it from the rest of the PEB bus, just like the buffers in the end of the Flex Cable do when it is connected to the console. In standard configuration it is buffered by the Flex Cable, but if you put it into the PEB, it isn't, so you should buffer it on the adapter card.

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It is more in the line of bus-isolation than it is termination. It just prevents signals from one card from accidentally interfering with other cards on the same bus.

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Does "buffer" mean something like "bus-termination" ?

Buffers (drivers) are repeaters more or less. They take a signal and retransmite it along the line. They serve multiple purposes.

 

Prevent signal degradation.

 

Allow logic selection as to whether signals get passed or not.

 

Provide some internal logic protection when electronic mishaps occur. (Provided they are of the front line ilk.)

 

The term "buffer" really means the last item as it offers some protection to the internal card logic when something bad happens.

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ah OK, but finally he "liked" it, so I can like him (not his!!) back :)

uih, laerning englitsch issa bit harrd four me :)

(please always keep that in mind if I am kidding here on AA)

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OM ? ticket ? railstation ?

 

Nope. You posted a photo of an old TNC (Terminal Node Controller)... post-41141-0-79261800-1466035638_thumb.j

... so I thought you might be a HAM (Amateur Radio Operator).

 

OM is a term Ham's use to refer to each other sometimes. It means 'old man'.

TICKET is another word for a Ham's amateur radio license.

 

73!

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aaaaaah OK. I slightly remember. Back in the days I had amateur-radio (CB) in my LandCruiser,

but didn´t use it in that professional way. Just sometimes, when we were in the woods.

 

Roger, over and out :)

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That's one of the devices that you connect between the radio and the Hamsoft module. Most of the TI people used a diffeent model from Kantronics called "The Interface" (I have one of those somewhere), but yours is one of the other models that was listed as compatible.

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