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Is this a Japanese heavy-sixer?

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Hello all

 

I got this from a collector who got it from an other collector... that's just about all I know.

The machine works, but image quality is horrible on a PAL TV.

 

On the top right corner there is a label "2" (shiny metal-like)

On the bottom left there is an other label in Japanese (?)

 

Any information is more than welcome!

 

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DSC00673_zpske75pjbz.jpg

 

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Heavy Sixers were not released or made in Japan from what I know. The Heavy Sixer was only released in North America. In Japan their models were released in 1983 as the Atari 2800 which looks like the Sears Video Arcade 2 and Atari 7800. It's very likely that these are stickers someone placed on there. Other than that a very pristine and beautiful looking Heavy Sixer.

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It is Japanese script. Although I am not that good at reading it.

 

Rough translation for the back sticker:

 

This TV game is 2 Channel dedicated only.

Caution: In addition It cannot be used outside.

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If I remember, Epoch imported the 2600 from USA to Japan, years before the 2800.

They sold only a few ones; they were expensive.

They prefered to sell Epoch's own consoles; the Atari one was not their main goal.

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Also the trim around the switches is yellow and not orange like us versions. So it must be foreign.

Actually Heavy Sixers have a yellowish paint around the trim along the bezel. Light Sixers and 4 switch woodies are orange.

 

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Thanks for the answers!

 

I found this on gamestudies.org:

"However, the production of ‘Made in Japan’ home consoles started in 12 September 1975 with the toy company Epoch[12] and its “TV Tennis Electrotennis”. Epoch made a partnership with Magnavox for the development of the technology, as this console was wireless and functioning through a UHF antenna. It was obviously a Pong clone for the home, and was probably released even before the Atari “Home Pong” which has supposedly been commercialized by Sears for Christmas 1975 (Kent, 2001, p. 242). From 1975 to 1983, until the arrival of the Nintendo Family Computer (Famicom) in 1983, around 125 home consoles were released in Japan, most of them Pong clones and dedicated consoles, including importations of US consoles Odyssey (1974) and Atari VCS (1977) (Atsugi & Mizusaki, 2000; Game Museum, 2005, pp. 5--9)."

 

Is there anybody out there who is knowledgeable enough to confirm that this is an Epoch machine?

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Hello all

 

I got this from a collector who got it from an other collector... that's just about all I know.

The machine works, but image quality is horrible on a PAL TV.

The bad image quality can be easily explained, Japanese TVs are NTSC.

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Wonder why it can't be used outside?

 

 

No kidding! Just a generic warning I'm sure. Like those tags that read: "WARNING! No user serviceable parts inside". :lol:

 

Really? I'm a user and those "parts" are quite serviceable to me. Replaceable at least. Maybe that's how they should be phrased: "ATTENTION! It's highly unlikely that you can replace the parts inside, so KEEP OUT"! :rolling:

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Did you try another channel besides the usual 3 and 4? I believe some of these were tuned to use Channel 7 or 8 in Japan... Just a guess.

Edited by GrizzLee

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It is Japanese script. Although I am not that good at reading it.

 

Rough translation for the back sticker:

 

This TV game is 2 Channel dedicated only.

Caution: In addition It cannot be used outside.

I translated it with the Google translator and its like that:

The game is only on channel 2.

Note: You can not use it on an other channel than 2.

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I bought that unit mentioned here some days ago.

 

I like to find out about its history.

So if someone has some information or a similar device let me know.

 

Thanks

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Just to correct a few things here. The heavy sixer was not limited to north america. I have a genuine PAL heavy sixer that was sold here in the UK. And also mine has an orange bezel that is original, so its not true that all heavy sixers had a yellow painted bezel.

It also has the original 01 combat gatefold in PAL format too as well as 2 original CX10 joysticks. Coaxial cable built in.

Genuine PAL heavy sixers are rare. But it may have been sold in Japan too.

A beautiful looking console indeed.

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It's not uncommon for importers to put regional labeling on a product, sometimes over the OEM. I'd bet this is real. The End of the RF cable looks like what I have seen in Japan. My heavy sixer had a hardwired RF cable... *had*.

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U.S. Heavy Sixers, at least the early ones, were dedicated to channel 2 and did not have a channel select switch. The text on the Epoch import states that the console can only be used on channel 2. However, which channel 2? The U.S. channel 2 is in the 54-60MHz band, but the Japanese Channel 2 is in the 96-102MHz band. U.S. and Japanese TVs of the time did not have the ability to receive at the other country's respective frequencies. Therefore, I cannot see how these systems would have worked in Japan unless Atari or Epoch modified the RF modulator inside the system.

 

Also, that connector may look like a 300-75 Ohm Balun, but I think it is more likely to be a right angle coaxial connector that someone put on as a mod. Japanese TVs tended to support both 300 Ohm separated pair and 75 Ohm single wire connections, but earlier TVs require the user to twist a wire around a screw connector and clamp the ground shielding for 75 Ohms. Later TVs may have come with a coaxial screw.

Edited by Great Hierophant

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U.S. Heavy Sixers, at least the early ones, were dedicated to channel 2 and did not have a channel select switch.

 

Very informative post. But, I do not believe this part to be entirely accurate. I have a Heavy Sixer w/o channel select switch and it tunes to channel 3 (I have not put a scope on it to check the output, but all my TVs tune it on 3). I believe the Heavy Sixers w/o the channel select switch overall varied what channel it tuned to. It would be interesting to compile the data from the Heavy Sixer serial number list here to see the variance.

 

-Allen

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