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Homebrew games packages

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Only noticed the above till now.

I've tested this game running off an Atari 400 16K computer and it works fine. Don't know about the 600XL 16K computer - but guess it should be OK too.

 

Harvey

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Another Pong, attached to ABBUC Magazine Issue #136 (First Quarter 2019).

 

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Three-part question here. Do most of the homebrew games featured here work on NTSC computers? Of these homebrew games that work on NTSC computers, do most fit on cartridge? If so, would someone stateside be willing to put the freely-available ROM for a given game on a donor cart for me along with a decent quality label for an agreed upon dollar amount? It seems like a good number of these physical releases only came out in Europe, and I've only had one developer be willing to mail his game to me in the US (Jim Slide - awesome game!), which is a little surprising considering I buy from all over the world on eBay and it seems pretty easy and shipping costs are reasonable, but I digress.

 

Beyond that, some really good 8-bit homebrew has never seen a physical release at all (RGB comes to mind). Would these games also work on NTSC and would someone be willing to throw that on a cart for me with label, etc., like above?

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Three-part question here. Do most of the homebrew games featured here work on NTSC computers? Of these homebrew games that work on NTSC computers, do most fit on cartridge? If so, would someone stateside be willing to put the freely-available ROM for a given game on a donor cart for me along with a decent quality label for an agreed upon dollar amount? It seems like a good number of these physical releases only came out in Europe, and I've only had one developer be willing to mail his game to me in the US (Jim Slide - awesome game!), which is a little surprising considering I buy from all over the world on eBay and it seems pretty easy and shipping costs are reasonable, but I digress.

 

Beyond that, some really good 8-bit homebrew has never seen a physical release at all (RGB comes to mind). Would these games also work on NTSC and would someone be willing to throw that on a cart for me with label, etc., like above?

I don't know if there are European-US-forwarding services but if you want I can forward games to you at cost. I.e. you have the stuff sent to me, I put it in a parcel and send it to you.

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I recently got to two games from Video61 and found both the packaging and the labels underwhelming compared to some less commercial "homebrew" efforts. One cart was fixed in the blister pack with a double-sided tape which promptly tore off the rear half of the cartridge shell when I pulled it out.

 

I don't agree with the commercial assessment, though. I am not really after physical media and boxes (which means the underwhelming carts don't really bother me) and I would not have bought either game had they been available for download.

 

I have no idea how many games Video61 and peteym sell and I don't dare to judge if they'd sell double the number at half the profit if they provided top-notch packaging. In the end it's their call and if they chose to do it this way, so be it. I dare say some makers of home-brew games enjoy providing a nice overall package and the "community credit" this entitles too, even if they hardly break even selling them to collectors, while others might see it more as a small and les glamorous side business that earns them a small profit or at least pocket money. To each his own, we get more programs either way.

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I don't know if there are European-US-forwarding services but if you want I can forward games to you at cost. I.e. you have the stuff sent to me, I put it in a parcel and send it to you.

Thanks for that offer. I'll look into that and PM you if it makes sense for me cost-wise.

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I don't know if there are European-US-forwarding services but if you want I can forward games to you at cost. I.e. you have the stuff sent to me, I put it in a parcel and send it to you.

 

Last year, I utilized Borderlinx to obtain a copy of the most excellent Laura.

 

Price and turnaround time were both reasonable.

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Last year, I utilized Borderlinx to obtain a copy of the most excellent Laura.

 

Price and turnaround time were both reasonable.

Very cool! Not familiar with that service. I've been eyeing Laura; would love to get my hands on a copy. Will be looking into Borderlinx. Thanks!

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Very cool! Not familiar with that service. I've been eyeing Laura; would love to get my hands on a copy. Will be looking into Borderlinx. Thanks!

With services like these its usually cheaper to have several packages consolidated into one but you need to check how much they charge you for storing and re-packing into one box (consolidation). Google a bit for competitors and rates before choosing a service. (The drawback of consolidation is it always sends me on a shopping spree...)

 

Youre happy in having an 800$ limit before import duties are charged. Over here the limit is 25 and is now being lowered to zero to discourage those shipping free from China sellers who simply declare everything to be that cheap. The actual customs/tax doesnt hurt as much as the minimum 10 fee the shippers charge for customs handling.

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@sixersfan105, why don't you use one of the SD card multicarts like Ultimate? If you want each game on individual cartridge, then you could use Atarimax Maxflash cartridges. They're around $20 each. I don't see why you have problem with developers shipping from Europe to US. In the past I ordered many times from Germany and Poland and never had a problem.

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@sixersfan105, why don't you use one of the SD card multicarts like Ultimate? If you want each game on individual cartridge, then you could use Atarimax Maxflash cartridges. They're around $20 each. I don't see why you have problem with developers shipping from Europe to US. In the past I ordered many times from Germany and Poland and never had a problem.

 

There is a small handful of sellers who will only ship in Europe, I've missed two cart games due to this...

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There is a small handful of sellers who will only ship in Europe, I've missed two cart games due to this...

Could you name them?

 

I emailed the author of Laura, and he is out of physical copies of his game.

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Could you name them?

 

I emailed the author of Laura, and he is out of physical copies of his game.

 

Laura was the main one that comes to mind. I offered to pay extra for postage and was flatly declined

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@sixersfan105, why don't you use one of the SD card multicarts like Ultimate? If you want each game on individual cartridge, then you could use Atarimax Maxflash cartridges. They're around $20 each. I don't see why you have problem with developers shipping from Europe to US. In the past I ordered many times from Germany and Poland and never had a problem.

 

I hear you, but SD multicarts don't really do it for me. I like physical releases like you would get with original titles back in the day, complete with boxes, manuals, etc. It's an expensive habit, I know. The developer for Jim Slide was the only one with a cartridge-based European homebrew that was willing to ship to me in the United States. I recognize that many of the European homebrews were only released in physical form on floppy disk due to cartridge space limitations or otherwise, but I much prefer cartridges, so that limits my options further.

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I understand you, but in your first post you asked someone to make you basically a reproduction of the homebrew cartridge. You not going to get a box and manual or other items included in original release. In this case it's best to buy a bunch of Maxflash cartridges ($20 each) and print your own labels on a color printer.

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I understand you, but in your first post you asked someone to make you basically a reproduction of the homebrew cartridge. You not going to get a box and manual or other items included in original release. In this case it's best to buy a bunch of Maxflash cartridges ($20 each) and print your own labels on a color printer.

Probably true, and maybe I'll do that when my schedule allows in the future. I still think flash carts are a little like cheating and obviously aren't as true to the original hardware, which I try to be.

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Flash in some form existed in the era, so I don't look down on those solutions in the least today.

To each his own. SD cards came out in 2000...It's hard for me to consider a flash cart one and the same with an Atari product. Don't get me wrong, I get their function in today's world and agree that they are pretty cool for sampling games on original hardware, but it's not the same to me as the "old school" carts.

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Many different flash projects were going on leading up to when Exel filed a patent for the first NOR organized flash memory cell and In 1986 Intel introduced the flash card concept with the ECC and on-card controller as the company formed a unit focusing on solid state drives.

Flash memory industry was growing rapidly at the end of the 1980s ($1.6M for 1987; $6.4M for 1988; $25M for 1989)... followed by many inventions and patents built on all of this

 

There are notes and prototypes pre-dating all of this, but this when it was going mainstream. I think Toshiba was busy by 1987 as well. So it's old school to me, but you might be going further back and getting really ancient school if want to do bubble memory or something along those lines....

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hmm had to look up things a bit to go ancient...

The success of flash memory started at Bell Laboratories. In 1967 Kahng and Sze invented the floating gate memory device which allows a transistor to remember a digital value of 0 or 1 without power until it was ready to be read/checked. A few years later Eli Harari of Hughes Electronics filed for first practical floating gate EEPROM (Electrically Erasable Programmable Read Only Memory) using thin SiO2 using the electron characteristic of Fowler Nordheim tunneling for programming and erasure. Toshiba did their thing in 1984(nor), and 1987(nand).

 

So it all looks good to me.

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Looks like Toshiba has their own take on history, but it really doesn't matter, and they have an explanation that is plausible as any that it was quick a a camera flash to write or retrieve data etc....

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