Jump to content
davidcalgary29

What Thrift Store finds did you pass over...and later regret?

Recommended Posts

About ten years ago, I saw two Apple IIGSes and two Sinclair QLs at a Red Deer, Alberta Value Village. I didn't (and still don't) collect non-Atari systems, so I decided not to buy them. One of the IIGS machines was the "Woz" special and powered up, and was selling complete for $49. I managed to pick up four rare A8 carts (including Romox carts) for $.99 CDN each at the time, so I'm guessing it all must've been some collector's hoard.

 

Before that -- it must've been about 2002 -- I saw a complete A8 setup (800XL, 2 1050s, bunch of carts) at a Calgary, AB Salvation Army for $10. I didn't want to double up, so I passed on it all.

 

Anyone pass up on a thrift deal that caused later regrets?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Life's too short, let it go! It's just stuff, it's all gone when you die. If you really care that much, ten years later, hunt it down on eBay and pay a little more than you might have otherwise.

 

213581f4b07b674643eb66423d46297c5371728d

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't seem to ever have the kind of luck other people have in finding stuff in thrift stores, garage sales, etc. Maybe it's that where I live (Long Island, and before that NYC) gets picked over so quick.

 

I did go to a massive thrift store in PA over the weekend and I kinda regret not buying the Tandy CGA monitor they had for $20 to go with my Tandy 1000; I somehow thought CGA and VGA were pin compatible, and I could just hook up to a cheap VGA LCD. Now it seems like I'd have to spend around $100 (with shipping) on Ebay to get the same thing.

 

They also had a bunch of Apple IIGS RGB monitors for $35... mine is scratched pretty bad right in the middle so I've been on the lookout for a replacement. It's really tough to find CRT monitors on Ebay with reasonable shipping (and a decent price on the unit itself) and then who knows what's going to happen to them before they actually get to you. But I ended up spending more than I planned to begin with on a C64, so I didn't buy anything else and now I wish I had.

Edited by spacecadet

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Twenty years ago, I saw a massive, and massively ugly, white suitcase containing a prehistoric game system. I never asked how much it cost and just left it behind. Now I realize that the system was an Odyssey... not an Odyssey2, but the original machine designed by the late Ralph Baer. That... was not one of my smarter decisions.

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This isn't exactly a thrift store find, but when I was living in New Jersey in early 2000, I remember walking into our local Ames department store (long since defunct) and seeing a pallet filled with brand new Sega Genesis 3 consoles on clearance, marked down to $9 each. I picked up three, and somehow ended up getting two of them for $3 each. I gave one away and resold the other two for a small profit later, figuring that the Genesis 3 was the cheap and crappy version of the Sega Genesis. Had I known then that they would become more valuable, I would have filled my car with them.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

About 20 years ago I saw Apple III computer at a pawn shop for $25. Passed it as I didn't think it was worth anything.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In the mid 90's I went to a local pawn and saw a weird mini arcade with a few games and a super low rez red screen. Yes an adventurevision. At the time I had no clue what it was and for years just called it 'that red pre atari system.' Most anybody I ever told about it thought I was a nut.

 

I had no idea what crazy money they were. The store wanted $200 for it. Apparently nobody else knew either cause it sat for years...till the pawn closed. I did once offer $50 for it (which i thought was still a stratospheric price) and was turned down. No.wonder they went out of business.

 

Still even though I'll likely never own one I did at least get to play one. That space shooter was cool. The games may have been the complete library too. Wasn't there only four made?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This isn't exactly a thrift store find, but when I was living in New Jersey in early 2000, I remember walking into our local Ames department store (long since defunct) and seeing a pallet filled with brand new Sega Genesis 3 consoles on clearance, marked down to $9 each. I picked up three, and somehow ended up getting two of them for $3 each. I gave one away and resold the other two for a small profit later, figuring that the Genesis 3 was the cheap and crappy version of the Sega Genesis. Had I known then that they would become more valuable, I would have filled my car with them.

Checking eBay price they don't appear to be any more valuable than the other versions. Average price around $35 w/ free shipping. After shipping costs and eBay fees, seller might make a whole $15-20 on each system and that doesn't include deducting the original cost paid for the system. Not really worth the effort of taking pictures, listing it, packing for shipment, and gas to the post office if you ask me.

Edited by thadsilverfox

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

About 20 years ago I saw Apple III computer at a pawn shop for $25. Passed it as I didn't think it was worth anything.

I don't think 20 years ago they were really worth anything, so you didn't miss out on anything if your intention was to flip it back then.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Late 80s, a closing down movie theater in Charlotte NC, had an arcade auction which included a Blaster Cockpit Cab that went for peanuts, that I nor my dad put any bid on.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I haven't really encountered anything I truly regret, really...

 

I remember an intellivision back in middle school that I couldn't convince my mom to get me (saw another guy buying it as soon as I was told to put it back)

I know I passed on a Saturn with no hookups/controller once

And walked away from Suikoden 2 and Phoenix Wright (while it was hard to find) due to lack of cash- Suikoden was $50, not sure on Phoenix.

 

Here's the thing, though- I own all of those now, save the Saturn. Every single one cost me less to acquire than if I'd gotten it the first time. My fiancé's family gave me their old Inty. I found the Suikoden 2 disc during one of Game Crazy's classic plastic sales, so it was $5. Eventually got the manual & case for an overall investment of $35ish. Phoenix got reprinted, I think I got it as a Christmas present. After Phoenix was when I started setting aside money for my 'splurge fund', as I call it- so I wouldn't have to pass on a good find again. In a way, the lesson was more valuable than the game.

 

In the end though, it's all just stuff. Do I kinda wish I'd just bought the weird-looking Gamecube disc in the thrift store that I later learned was a demo kiosk disc? Maybe- but what would I really do with it? I'd go "lookie what I got", maybe play it for 5 minutes, then stick it in my cabinet and let it get dusty. I've got a lot of great games, I'm not losing sleep over what I don't have. Maybe the Saturn a bit- but that's my inner 13 year old still being pissed her Christmas Nights disc got stolen.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Part of my problem is that I DON'T pass up on stuff enough. :lol:

 

Only think I sorta kick myself on passing up was a really nice 2600 bundle at a yard sale. It was a heavy sixer, and had a lot of launch carts (the numbered ones) and some other carts I didn't have. I was being a cheap bastard and offered them $20. Some guy next to me offered $25 and went home with it. No big loss, but it would have been nice to have.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think about two years ago I passed on an Apple IIe with monitor, printer, software, etc for $10 at a yard sale. The guy was looking to just get rid of it, but I didn't have the room or interest to store or use it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I regret not getting a nice console TV, because now they all refuse to sell them =|

 

Although I really didn't have anywhere to put one back then.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Twenty years ago, I saw a massive, and massively ugly, white suitcase containing a prehistoric game system. I never asked how much it cost and just left it behind. Now I realize that the system was an Odyssey... not an Odyssey2, but the original machine designed by the late Ralph Baer. That... was not one of my smarter decisions.

 

I guess so ...but what would you have done with it? You wouldn't have played with a massive, ugly, prehistoric game system. Would you have stuck it in storage, hoped that it didn't break down over time, and eventually seek out a buyer many years later? Might as well kick yourself for not buying Apple stock in the early 1980s, too.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't have any significant regrets, either. My gaming interests are fairly narrow, and storage space is an issue, so I have no interest in acquiring a specimen of every different console or classic computer. I also have no interest in purchasing purely to resell -- the returns are just too low to justify the time and effort involved.

 

Very often, too, one finds just random bits and pieces of hardware. I have no interest in buying a bare console and hoping to eventually find the controllers, power supply, games, etc. at a later date. I suppose that I could buy EVERYTHING game-related that I find, and ultimately piece together working systems (to collect and/or resell), but that would require my own warehouse to store inventory, and it would cost far more than I am willing to spend.

 

A few years ago, I did pass on a small stack of back issues of EGM magazine at a local thrift shop; I was mostly focused on PlayStation (and PS 2) games at the time. Today, I will buy almost any old video game magazine that I find as my collection is still very small.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm going to complain that we've had this thread before. Not because I'm against old topics getting refreshed, but because you're going to make me cry about this again...

 

A while back at Goodwill there was an honest-to-goodness Yamaha DX-7 sitting on the shelf. That was one of the premier synthesizers of the '80s. You heard the synth everywhere, especially if you listened to pop or electronica music. Similar technology found its way into PC sound cards, arcade sound chips and the Sega Genesis, so really you couldn't avoid that signature "FM" synth sound no matter where you went.

 

I passed on it because it had a couple of broken keys. Ever since I've been wondering WTF was I thinking? And thank you so much for bringing up such a painful subject!

 

 

 

(I'm not bitter... much.) :D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

About 20 years ago, at toys r us, I bought a 32x and a three games from the bargain bin. 20 bucks for the 32x, 5 bucks for each game. They had several copies of, Spider Man: Web Of Fire. Had I known it would be worth so much now, I'd have bought every copy.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm going to complain that we've had this thread before. Not because I'm against old topics getting refreshed, but because you're going to make me cry about this again...

 

A while back at Goodwill there was an honest-to-goodness Yamaha DX-7 sitting on the shelf. That was one of the premier synthesizers of the '80s. You heard the synth everywhere, especially if you listened to pop or electronica music. Similar technology found its way into PC sound cards, arcade sound chips and the Sega Genesis, so really you couldn't avoid that signature "FM" synth sound no matter where you went.

 

 

 

Those 80s synths are fun but damn are they hard to tinker with. I had a DX7 and a Roland D50 over the years. Funsies.

 

Anyway, this isn't strictly a thrift thing, but when I was in middle school, my elementary school upgraded everything to mac, and literally threw out about 30-40 Apple IIc and IIe's. Should've probably jumped on that.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I guess so ...but what would you have done with it? You wouldn't have played with a massive, ugly, prehistoric game system. Would you have stuck it in storage, hoped that it didn't break down over time, and eventually seek out a buyer many years later? Might as well kick yourself for not buying Apple stock in the early 1980s, too.

 

Part of the reason I didn't buy it was because it just didn't seem practical. I honestly can't say I would have spent much time playing it, so I guess I can't get too upset over the console slipping through my fingers.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

I guess so ...but what would you have done with it? You wouldn't have played with a massive, ugly, prehistoric game system. Would you have stuck it in storage, hoped that it didn't break down over time, and eventually seek out a buyer many years later? Might as well kick yourself for not buying Apple stock in the early 1980s, too.

 

Yea, who would want that gigantic super heavy duty molded travel case overflowing with two sizes of intricate screen overlays, game cards, poker chips, play money, and playing cards? So old and outdated! I would just emulate it, it takes up a lot less space that way.

post-40273-0-11479200-1471058096_thumb.jpg

Makes my skin crawl just looking at the thing!

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm going to complain that we've had this thread before. Not because I'm against old topics getting refreshed, but because you're going to make me cry about this again...

 

A while back at Goodwill there was an honest-to-goodness Yamaha DX-7 sitting on the shelf. That was one of the premier synthesizers of the '80s. You heard the synth everywhere, especially if you listened to pop or electronica music. Similar technology found its way into PC sound cards, arcade sound chips and the Sega Genesis, so really you couldn't avoid that signature "FM" synth sound no matter where you went.

 

I passed on it because it had a couple of broken keys. Ever since I've been wondering WTF was I thinking? And thank you so much for bringing up such a painful subject!

 

 

 

(I'm not bitter... much.) :D

That is actually good new that you passed on it. It seems that most of the stuff at Goodwill is donated because it doesn't work.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That is actually good new that you passed on it. It seems that most of the stuff at Goodwill is donated because it doesn't work.

Shouldn't be that hard to fix a couple broken keys, even if you have to fabricate something yourself.

 

I've had pretty decent luck at thrifts, maybe better than eBay, although I did get a Wurlitzer organ for $10 once because it had a plug broken off inside the headphone jack (which came out easily).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...