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Are Classic Mini controllers OEM to Nintendo controllers made 30 years ago?

OEM controllers  

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  1. 1. Are Classic Mini controllers OEM to Nintendo controllers made 30 years ago?

    • No
      10
    • Yes
      0


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....

You would rather use a classic mini ... for parts for an original ... because ... which is NOT... because ... is NOT.... You would rather use these ... mini components that replicate.... but are not made for the original.... instead of using..... Go right ahead.

That's what she said ;-)

 

I forecast another week long vacation for the stickler, but I have been wrong in the past so don't count on it.

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Hmm... I guess I just prefer to distinguish between what's original for one thing and what's original for another. However, I regularly deal in lots of little original parts for random and sometimes obscure products, and I've found that most people expect the term "OEM" to signify some degree of originality to the respective end product.

 

 

Then use the word "original". As I said before, all original parts are OEM, but not all OEM parts are original.

 

 

The distributor installed in my car is an aftermarket item that was made by a manufacturer that never directly sold distributors to the company that made my vehicle. However, that parts manufacturer likely makes parts that are original equipment for OTHER brands of vehicles, so the part manufacturer is most certainly an "OEM". However, that does not make the distributor I installed an OEM part, as it was never "Original Equipment" for my vehicle.

 

"OEM part" applies to parts that were actually manufactured by or authorized by the original manufacturer of the product the part belongs to. For example, the Ford (Motorcraft) ignition coil and the GM (AC Delco) HEI ignition module in my '69 Dodge Charger are OEM parts, because they were both factory-installed in various Ford and GM vehicles. They are obviously not original to the car, and to use them required me to modify the original ignition system, but OEM doesn't necessarily mean "original". However, if GM or Ford unilaterally decided to make clones of NES controller parts, they wouldn't be OEM parts, because the original manufacturer (Nintendo) didn't authorize it. In your case it is probably not an OEM part. A lot of the car parts OEMs make unauthorized copies of other OEMs' parts in addition to their actual OEM parts.

 

Besides, "OEM" isn't necessarily a good thing. I've seen many different products that have flawed OEM parts that are fixed by using higher quality aftermarket parts. For instance, Atari controllers have LOTS of upgrade kits available to correct the flaws present in lower quality parts made by Atari or their OEMs.

 

OEM is a good thing, from my perspective, with regard to Nintendo controllers, which is the only thing relevant in this context.

 

 

LOL first off where exactly are Nintendo products made?

 

Not by a random factory in China, and not without input or authorization from Nintendo.

 

2nd your problem the entire time through both threads is you mistakenly calling Nintendo a manufacturer. Nintendo is NOT a Manufacturer. Nintendo is a Company name.

 

Nintendo is a manufacturer, not that it's even remotely relevant. Parts in their official products are OEM regardless of who manufactured them.

 

Let me use real life experience for you. I worked at a Manufacturing plant called Pactiv we made lots of Styrofoam products. We made Styrofoam plates and such for many COMPANIES such as Great Value, however the parent company associated w/the manufacturing plant of Pactiv was Reynolds. This means the Company Reynolds such as for Reynolds wrap has their products made by the Manufacturer Pactiv, just as Great Value, and Hefty, and so on.

 

 

Again, this is irrelevant.

 

Nintendo does NOT manufacture anything

 

False. Here's at least one thing they manufacture:

 

Nintendo's Australian subsidiary is based in Melbourne, Victoria. It handles the publishing, distribution, sales and marketing of Nintendo products in Australia, New Zealand, and Oceania (Cook Islands, Fiji, New Caledonia, Papua New Guinea, Samoa, and Vanuatu). It also manufactures some Wii games locally.

 

 

they pay Manufacturing plants "IN CHINA might I ad" to make them their products for them. Manufacturing is a chain of plants.

 

Again, irrelevant. And I already know that much of Nintendo's stuff is made in China these days. I pointed it out several days ago on the huge NES mini thread, when discussing how cheaply they could have an HDMI-to-A/V adapter made if they wanted to. There's nothing inherently wrong with stuff made in China. China has nuclear weapons. They can manufacture high quality and even exotic stuff when they want to. Knockoff products made in random Chinese factories don't tend to be very good though.

 

Nintendo will say what they want and check and make sure the product is made to their specifications but that is all they do.

 

Which is all that matters. When Nintendo manufacturers or has someone manufacture parts for their products, those parts are OEM by definition.

 

So to sum up what you want to say properly is as follow.

 

You would rather use a classic mini controller for parts for an original NES controller because it has Nintendo's approval of quality from whatever OEM facility they chose which is NOT Nintendo because Nintendo is NOT a manufacturer. You would rather use these Nintendo approved OEM classic mini components that replicate the original NES controller but are not made for the original Nes controller instead of using aftermarket components designed specifically for the NES controller. Go right ahead.

 

It doesn't make any difference what product they are made for as long as they do what I want them to do, which they will, as the video that someone linked to on the other thread proves. I'll take Nintendo's choices regarding grades of rubber, conductive coating, conductive coating attachment methods, grades of plastic, tolerances, and so on, over some random Chinese factory's choices.

 

Also, your suggestion isn't even a comparable alternative to what I want to do, as I've pointed out more than once before. Your suggestion just gets you new rubber switches. What I want to do gets me new rubber switches, a new shell, new buttons, and a new D-pad, i.e., everything that counts with regard to appearance, feel, and function will be brand new, and it will look identical to an original NES controller, aside from the small print on the back.

Edited by MaximRecoil

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That's what she said ;-)

 

I forecast another week long vacation for the stickler, but I have been wrong in the past so don't count on it.

He needs one badly. But I'm not a mod sooo...

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Then use the word "original". As I said before, all original parts are OEM, but not all OEM parts are original.

 

 

"OEM part" applies to parts that were actually manufactured by or authorized by the original manufacturer of the product the part belongs to. For example, the Ford (Motorcraft) ignition coil and the GM (AC Delco) HEI ignition module in my '69 Dodge Charger are OEM parts, because they were both factory-installed in various Ford and GM vehicles. They are obviously not original to the car, and to use them required me to modify the original ignition system, but OEM doesn't necessarily mean "original". However, if GM or Ford unilaterally decided to make clones of NES controller parts, they wouldn't be OEM parts, because the original manufacturer (Nintendo) didn't authorize it. In your case it is probably not an OEM part. A lot of the car parts OEMs make unauthorized copies of other OEMs' parts in addition to their actual OEM parts.

 

 

OEM is a good thing, from my perspective, with regard to Nintendo controllers, which is the only thing relevant in this context.

 

 

First, I'll use whatever words I want to accurately portray anything I'm selling/describing. OEM is WAAAAAAY too broadly interpreted, as this thread proves. As I said, I have found it necessary to use more precise language to accurately describe parts that I'm selling, since saying "Dodge car restored with 100% OEM parts" is very dishonest without further clarification of exactly what "OEM parts" truly means.

 

Second, thank you for telling me exactly what I already said. Yes, the distributor in my car is not an OEM part. I stated that quite clearly.

 

Third, my statement about the quality (or lack of it) of OEM parts is completely relevant to the discussion. Just because YOU don't find it relevant doesn't make it irrelevant to this thread. I was pointing out that OEM parts aren't always well made or designed, which conflicts with your apparent view of the quality of OEM parts. If you bring up your opinions in a discussion, you should be OK with those opinions being argued against and not simply immediately throw those points out as "irrelevant". Considering that the original question that started this thread doesn't actually make any sense should illustrate that "relevance" in this discussion could include just about anything.

 

Lastly, feel free to make your counterpoint to each of these comments. This is my last post in this thread. Believe it or not, I actually agree that an OEM part will always be an OEM part, no matter how the customer utilizes it. Just like a brick will always be a brick even if the buyer uses it as a doorstop.

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He needs one badly. But I'm not a mod sooo...

Al should give him his own subforum, call it "Guru on the Mountain". I have a feeling it would be nothing but crickets chirping. :(

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First, I'll use whatever words I want to accurately portray anything I'm selling/describing. OEM is WAAAAAAY too broadly interpreted, as this thread proves. As I said, I have found it necessary to use more precise language to accurately describe parts that I'm selling, since saying "Dodge car restored with 100% OEM parts" is very dishonest without further clarification of exactly what "OEM parts" truly means.

 

As I said, "Then use the word 'original'". And you have it backwards; "OEM" isn't typically too broadly interpreted, it is typically too narrowly (and incorrectly) interpreted, such as by people who seem to think it is interchangeable with the word "original".

 

Second, thank you for telling me exactly what I already said.

 

I didn't do any such thing.

 

Yes, the distributor in my car is not an OEM part. I stated that quite clearly.

 

It probably isn't, as I said, but that hasn't been established. What's the make and/or part number of it? If it was ever used as a factory part on any car ever made, then it is an OEM part, regardless of it not having been used as a factory part on your year/make/model of car. What the consumer uses a part for has no bearing whatsoever on whether or not it is an OEM part.

 

Third, my statement about the quality (or lack of it) of OEM parts is completely relevant to the discussion. Just because YOU don't find it relevant doesn't make it irrelevant to this thread. I was pointing out that OEM parts aren't always well made or designed, which conflicts with your apparent view of the quality of OEM parts. If you bring up your opinions in a discussion, you should be OK with those opinions being argued against and not simply immediately throw those points out as "irrelevant". Considering that the original question that started this thread doesn't actually make any sense should illustrate that "relevance" in this discussion could include just about anything.

 

No, it doesn't conflict with any of my views, given that I never claimed, suggested, nor even hinted that OEM parts in general are always the best. I gave the opinion in a very specific context, which is, parts compatible with an NES controller. Naming various other products in which aftermarket parts are better than OEM parts is irrelevant, though a general rule is something like this: OEM parts are typically better than cheaper aftermarket "equivalents". On the other hand, specialty aftermarket parts built with a goal other than offering the customer a lower-priced alternative to OEM (such as fixing a known flaw, or making it heavier-duty or otherwise high-performance) are often better than OEM, and often more expensive as well. Aftermarket high-end car audio equipment blows OEM stuff out of the water, for example.

 

This is my last post in this thread. Believe it or not, I actually agree that an OEM part will always be an OEM part, no matter how the customer utilizes it. Just like a brick will always be a brick even if the buyer uses it as a doorstop.

 

Then why are you arguing?

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More importantly, why doesn't ignoring someone in the web version of the forum carry over to Tapatalk? I have to manually scroll past the dickery!

 

 

That's what she said ;-)

 

I forecast another week long vacation for the stickler, but I have been wrong in the past so don't count on it.

 

 

He needs one badly. But I'm not a mod sooo...

 

 

Al should give him his own subforum, call it "Guru on the Mountain". I have a feeling it would be nothing but crickets chirping. :(

 

Be careful when throwing those paper cups from the sidelines ... you could put an eye out.

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Be careful when throwing those paper cups from the sidelines ... you could put an eye out.

Those are hints. You should take them.

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Those are hints. You should take them.

 

This topic of this thread is an argument, specifically, an argument the OP started with me on a different thread, which he decided to make this "callout thread" about. The original post even attempts to summarize "argument A" and "argument b". Of course, the OP straw-manned my argument, i.e., I never argued what he claims I did, and his poll question doesn't even make sense, but regardless of that, that argument is what this thread is about. Peanut gallery-type comments, AKA: heckling, AKA: throwing paper cups from the sidelines, are not only laughably pathetic, but they are always off-topic, especially in this thread. If you don't have an argument, why are you posting on this thread?

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False. Here's at least one thing they manufacture:

 

"Nintendo's Australian subsidiary is based in Melbourne, Victoria. It handles the publishing, distribution, sales and marketing of Nintendo products in Australia, New Zealand, and Oceania (Cook Islands, Fiji, New Caledonia, Papua New Guinea, Samoa, and Vanuatu). It also manufactures some Wii games locally."

 

 

 

sub·sid·i·ar·y
  1. 1.
    a company controlled by a holding company.

 

 

Please try to keep up. You just proved that Nintendo does not manufacturer anything. Just like My example about Pactiv making products for Companies like Reynolds and Great Value.

 

You are the one who started this anal shit over specifics. So now you are getting the specifics tossed back at you and you can't handle it.

 

That subsidiary "manufacturing" company has a name and it is NOT Nintendo. Nintendo is NOT a manufacturer.

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sub·sid·i·ar·y
a company controlled by a holding company.

 

It is called Nintendo Australia; "Nintendo" is right in the name. They own it (not just control it), just like they own Nintendo of America, Nintendo of Europe, and Nintendo of Korea. So yes, that is at least one thing that Nintendo manufactures.

 

Please try to keep up.

 

Irony.

 

You just proved that Nintendo does not manufacturer anything.

 

Even if your reasoning here were correct (it isn't; see above), it wouldn't have proven "that Nintendo does not manufacturer anything".

 

Just like My example about Pactiv making products for Companies like Reynolds and Great Value.

 

It is nothing like that example.

 

You are the one who started this anal shit over specifics. So now you are getting the specifics tossed back at you and you can't handle it.

 

This is a non sequitur, and a comical one at that, considering just how far removed from reality it is.

 

That subsidiary "manufacturing" company has a name and it is NOT Nintendo. Nintendo is NOT a manufacturer.

 

And this is even funnier. Yes, it does have a name: Nintendo Australia.

Edited by MaximRecoil

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You might want to go back to school.

 

 

Nintendo Australia Pty. Ltd. (NAL) is Oceania's local head office for sales, licensing and distribution of video game products and other intellectual properties created by Nintendo and other companies

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nintendo_Australia

 

Oceania is the geographical region of the world in which Australia is located. Nintendo owns Nintendo Australia, obviously.

 

"You might want to go back to school," indeed. The irony is thick as pea soup in here.

Edited by MaximRecoil

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I haven't said anything uncivil in this thread.

:roll:

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@MaximRecoil, with all due respect, even though I now have you on block, I can still choose to read your posts if I want to. I think what people are saying to you is you may want to dial down the attack rhetoric and "non-sequitur" rebuttuals and just take a break from posting. It's gorgeous weather where I live, lower 70s. Maybe take a walk and get some fresh air, perhaps? I'm gonna go ride my bike... ;-)

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