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Repairing Data Age cart Labels (replacements)

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I don't know what your Data Age carts look like, but mine didn't look that great.

 

post-9874-0-54757400-1495806195_thumb.jpg

 

The truth is, trying to just repair the label is a no go. There is no good way to go about it. So, I decide to just remake the entire label. These are not perfect reproduction as I'm unable to print the color "white". For that reason I did change the Data Age logo and titles to "black" (which is used by Date Age on a couple titles so it's not totally unoriginal). Also, the foil label material is a little more shiny than the original. I think over all they turned out well.

 

post-9874-0-42130000-1495806448_thumb.jpg

 

Taking pictures of foil labels is a little tricky (a lot of reflection). I'm hoping to do a short video to show how these look in normal light and how to replace the label. All my labels are laminated and computer cut to fit the carts they are designed for.

 

If you guys are interested in buying some of these replacement labels just PM me. I have these titles:

 

- Airlock

- Bermuda Triangle
- Bugs
- Encounter At L5
- Frankensteins Monster
- Journey Escape
- Sssnake
- Warplock
They are a little pricy at $5.00 each (in some cases more expensive than the carts themselves) so obviously these would be for those that really want their carts to look good. I do have a minimum purchase of $20.00 (not including shipping). Shipping is $7.00 priority inside the USA, $15.00 first class to Canada, and $22.00 anywhere else). Just PM me if you are interested.
If you guys have any questions at all, please do not hesitate to ask.

 

 

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Just to let you guys know, I have much more than just Data Age Atari 2600 carts label for those that are interested. Just PM me for a complete list (just so you know, the list is quite long).

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wow, that's great work. Have to check my Data Age carts right now

 

Just PM me if you would like to order some.

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Just a reminder, pm if you are interested.

 

Also, I have IMAGIC repro labels as well. I should have a topic started soon on these.

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So here's what I'm thinking, as far as getting a recreation of the white font (and it also appears that the center image uses a white background). I'm inspired to try this myself, but feel free to beat me to the punch. Here's the article that made me think there's a chance to "DIY" such a task: http://cedarcanyontextiles.com/outrageous-idea-transfer-foil-to-paper-with-a-laser-printer/

 

Here's my version of the idea, for imagic/DataAge/Spectravision carts:

 

1. Arrange the label in your editor so that everything but the white font and center image are 50% gray (CMYK: 0, 0, 0, 50). Black isn't important, and will probably darken the final product unnecessarily. Toner is toner, in this case, because it's our bonding agent; go with the most neutral of neutrals.

 

2. Print your gray label from your laser printer, let dry.

 

3. Lay foil on a flat surface, then lay the gray label face-down over the foil. Clamp or weigh down the edges of the sheets to secure and reduce movement as much as possible.

 

4. Flat iron the label sheet (gently, of course); this should bond the foil to only the gray toner.

 

5. THIS, I imagine, will be the real tricky part: C A R E F U L L Y peel away the foil.

 

6. If successful, let fully cool and dry (and cure, maybe?), then flatten under a heavy object (again, carefully).

 

7. Now here's where I become unsure of everything: from here, is it even possible to run the label through an inkjet printer for the final details? If so: great! Move onto the final step....

 

8. Laminate the label. I noticed Uline sells what they call "label protection tape"; is that stuff any good? Sounds promising enough, especially if thin and provides a nice semi gloss.

 

If you decide to try this before I can, pboland, please post results here. Curiosity has the best of me.

Edited by HeadcolorsTV

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So here's what I'm thinking, as far as getting a recreation of the white font (and it also appears that the center image uses a white background). I'm inspired to try this myself, but feel free to beat me to the punch. Here's the article that made me think there's a chance to "DIY" such a task: http://cedarcanyontextiles.com/outrageous-idea-transfer-foil-to-paper-with-a-laser-printer/

 

Here's my version of the idea, for imagic/DataAge/Spectravision carts:

 

1. Arrange the label in your editor so that everything but the white font and center image are 50% gray (CMYK: 0, 0, 0, 50). Black isn't important, and will probably darken the final product unnecessarily. Toner is toner, in this case, because it's our bonding agent; go with the most neutral of neutrals.

 

2. Print your gray label from your laser printer, let dry.

 

3. Lay foil on a flat surface, then lay the gray label face-down over the foil. Clamp or weigh down the edges of the sheets to secure and reduce movement as much as possible.

 

4. Flat iron the label sheet (gently, of course); this should bond the foil to only the gray toner.

 

5. THIS, I imagine, will be the real tricky part: C A R E F U L L Y peel away the foil.

 

6. If successful, let fully cool and dry (and cure, maybe?), then flatten under a heavy object (again, carefully).

 

7. Now here's where I become unsure of everything: from here, is it even possible to run the label through an inkjet printer for the final details? If so: great! Move onto the final step....

 

8. Laminate the label. I noticed Uline sells what they call "label protection tape"; is that stuff any good? Sounds promising enough, especially if thin and provides a nice semi gloss.

 

If you decide to try this before I can, pboland, please post results here. Curiosity has the best of me.

 

 

There are several ways to go about having the white color in the print. I've considered many already and actually considered an idea very much like what you have stated above and I decided against it for a couple of reasons. The main reason is a "cost vs. effort". Yes, there are ways to go about getting white on foil but in the end my goal was to make this at a reasonable price point for most people. The more work I put into a label the more I will need to charge for that label. And it isn't just DataAge labels that this needs to work but also Imagic, 5200, 7800 and a few other labels.

 

I'm sure it will work for one or two labels, but doing this for say 20 labels is going to be very time consuming.

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You need at least a five color process: Cyan, Yellow, Magenta, Black, White. The white needs to have an opaique binder; the other colors not. So you could use a 6 color commercial laser printer (commercial process normally use two shades of Cyan and Magenta to reduce dithering artifacts in prints, but other color inks can be substituted for custom jobs) for the special foil backed paper. Next you will need to assign a custom color profile within photoshop and assign a special channel to the white layer. The only downside is all this commercial printing equipment would cost vastly more than anything you gain selling the labels.

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There are several ways to go about having the white color in the print. I've considered many already and actually considered an idea very much like what you have stated above and I decided against it for a couple of reasons. The main reason is a "cost vs. effort". Yes, there are ways to go about getting white on foil but in the end my goal was to make this at a reasonable price point for most people. The more work I put into a label the more I will need to charge for that label. And it isn't just DataAge labels that this needs to work but also Imagic, 5200, 7800 and a few other labels.

 

I'm sure it will work for one or two labels, but doing this for say 20 labels is going to be very time consuming.

I definitely get your take on this. Having said that, I think it's something I'm going to experiment with some time down the road. I learned that, yes, one CAN print on foil leaf, if they first coat the surface with inkAID (or a similar product, if it exists); this "primes" the surface for inkjet printing, so to say.

 

I have about 400 physical games in my collection, across 13? 14? different consoles. None of those games are all that uncommon, which is a plus for if/when a given label goes to crap (I can refurbish the cart a fresh, new label--marked as such, of course--and not worry much about the thing's monetary value). Thing is, there are two things about me:

 

1. I'm starting to be much more compulsive about the presentation of my collection.

2. I'm almost DOGMATICALLY a diy person; especially when it comes to this hobby and its expenses.

 

Eventually, every cartridge is gonna be in its own universal game case sitting uniformly on a shelf. All labels will be crisp and clean (whether original--about 85%--or "repro"), and all games will have cover art. This is why learning the techniques to recreate ANY label type is important to me, personally.

 

If I can spend the time and money on the trial-and-error process until I can perfect the method, then it'll have been very worth it for me (kind of like the "give a man a fish, teach a man how to fish" proverb). Plus, I'm only going to keep buying carts, likely in "cart only" form. Save money, contribute to the learning process, DIY, save more money.

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...

 

If I can spend the time and money on the trial-and-error process until I can perfect the method, then it'll have been very worth it for me (kind of like the "give a man a fish, teach a man how to fish" proverb). Plus, I'm only going to keep buying carts, likely in "cart only" form. Save money, contribute to the learning process, DIY, save more money.

Good example of this in practice: sometimes at yard sales, you'll see VCS carts in TERRIBLE shape, or missing. Sometimes, you'll even see vendors at game conventions selling games with damaged/missing labels, two or three for a dollar. If it's a game you want, be thrifty, and bring it back to life.

 

Grading systems be damned; nobody can convince me that a standalone cart with a missing label is worth MORE than with a replacement label, especially if it's a common game.

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I definitely get your take on this. Having said that, I think it's something I'm going to experiment with some time down the road. I learned that, yes, one CAN print on foil leaf, if they first coat the surface with inkAID (or a similar product, if it exists); this "primes" the surface for inkjet printing, so to say.

 

I have about 400 physical games in my collection, across 13? 14? different consoles. None of those games are all that uncommon, which is a plus for if/when a given label goes to crap (I can refurbish the cart a fresh, new label--marked as such, of course--and not worry much about the thing's monetary value). Thing is, there are two things about me:

 

1. I'm starting to be much more compulsive about the presentation of my collection.

2. I'm almost DOGMATICALLY a diy person; especially when it comes to this hobby and its expenses.

 

Eventually, every cartridge is gonna be in its own universal game case sitting uniformly on a shelf. All labels will be crisp and clean (whether original--about 85%--or "repro"), and all games will have cover art. This is why learning the techniques to recreate ANY label type is important to me, personally.

 

If I can spend the time and money on the trial-and-error process until I can perfect the method, then it'll have been very worth it for me (kind of like the "give a man a fish, teach a man how to fish" proverb). Plus, I'm only going to keep buying carts, likely in "cart only" form. Save money, contribute to the learning process, DIY, save more money.

 

By all means, go with it. I was not trying to tell you not to do it. I was merely stating why I don't make foil labels that way.

 

You are not the first to like DIY. How do you think I got started doing this? I'm not a professional printer.

 

I make more than just labels. I also make controller overlays, posters and special projects all dealing with classic video games. I got started because I felt nobody was doing the things I wanted to my standard.

 

I'm guessing you are the same way and a perfectionist at that. My labels are 99% but to achieve the one more percent to make 100% I find can sometime not be worth it (in the case of DataAge it's the white logo). I have already spent a great amount of time, energy and money to get to that 99%. And when I look at that one more percent and I realize it's going to take everything of the last 99% plus double that (or even triple that), it just isn't worth it yet. In time it will be, but right now it is not for me.

 

Good luck! and I look forward to your results.

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I make more than just labels. I also make controller overlays, poster and special projects all dealing with classic video games.

Do you reproduce the Communist Mutants from Outer Space poster? ;)

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i think these threads are super cool to see the processes folks are using to replicate the labels. i do say to myself about once a week that itd be cool to replace the labels on my carts that look awful so i can.... enjoy them and use them.

 

i have no interest in reselling or presenting as original, i just want my games to not look awful on my desk.

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Do you reproduce the Communist Mutants from Outer Space poster? ;)

 

I could if I have a good scan of the other original. Or I can find enough original art to piece one together.

 

But right now, No I don't.

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i think these threads are super cool to see the processes folks are using to replicate the labels. i do say to myself about once a week that itd be cool to replace the labels on my carts that look awful so i can.... enjoy them and use them.

 

i have no interest in reselling or presenting as original, i just want my games to not look awful on my desk.

 

I can tell you that getting a scan copy of the original label never works out that great. I normally have to piece together the artwork from other materials to "rebuild" the label art (heck, sometimes I've had to redraw portions of labels). That's how I get my labels to look really clear. In many cases the labels end up looking clearer (and cleaner) than the originals.

 

If you guys are ever interested, I have many labels available for many pre-crash systems carts. Just PM me if you have any questions.

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