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NinjaWarrior

Are YouTubers Ruining Retro Gaming?

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There are many YouTubers I have watched that I feel are passionate about the games and the collecting hobby and pricing discussion and play-through videos are not things they engage in doing, these folk I don't believe harm retro gaming in any way aside from possibly drawing attention to scarce titles from time to time.

 

So then, how exactly should this supposed "passion" you speak of specifically be conveyed in a video? Should it only be relegated to talking about old times and being nostalgic about one's childhood? The reason I ask is, when you take out the collecting and gameplay videos, there's not much else left for the taking.

 

But then you have the play-through folk who literally record the entire game play experience from start to end and in many cases spoil the game for the viewer to the point they're unlikely to ever play it for themselves.

 

I may be biased because I fall into this category (i.e., I have actual experience making said videos), but with that I also see the other side of the equation.

 

The biggest thing that should be understood is that people watch these types of videos for a wide variety of reasons. Some people watch because they might not have the time to play through a game again, but still want to re-experience it without picking up a controller. Others might watch to see how someone else goes through the game. Perhaps they want to learn a new strategy or two, or maybe they are stuck at a certain part and need guidance on how to proceed. Others will watch to see if it is a game they might actually want to play, and some watch just to hear what opinions the commentator has about the game. Other viewers simply want a dose of nostalgia and someone to relate to at the same time.

 

Something else to consider outside the realm of entertainment is that playthroughs in any form have made text walkthroughs and FAQs mostly obsolete. No longer do you have to wade through pages and pages of unnecessary fluff to find what you are looking for--you can simply skip to whatever part in a video you are stuck at or have a question about. You can also use these videos to make comparisons with other versions without having to spend ages researching the subject. They are useful tools in a number of ways and this is important to acknowledge.

 

These videos obviously aren't for everyone, but the issue is not black or white and they most certainly have their place. Calling a subset of people dispassionate because they make these types of videos is highly ignorant.

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Longplays are fantastic that's just senseless whining picking on those. You damn well know it's a longplay or complete play as they're tagged as such. You'd basically have to be a moron not to expect every moment to get spoiled when a game is played out for you. It's a fantastic tool if you watch like 5-10% of it to see if you would hate or not the game or maybe clip to a point you're furious at and can't get by to see how it works. They're also awesome if you know you haven't the time to learn it, but would like to see how it played out end and all is a choice too.

 

It gets bad when you get a yammering idiot filling air time with senseless chatter though. I use non-blabbering long plays quite a bit when I'm on the fence with a game.

 

Austin also makes another good point longplay = visual gamefaq! At least the walkthrough part. I still mostly prefer the printed guide when they exist. :)

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So then, how exactly should this supposed "passion" you speak of specifically be conveyed in a video? Should it only be relegated to talking about old times and being nostalgic about one's childhood? The reason I ask is, when you take out the collecting and gameplay videos, there's not much else left for the taking.

 

 

I may be biased because I fall into this category (i.e., I have actual experience making said videos), but with that I also see the other side of the equation.

 

The biggest thing that should be understood is that people watch these types of videos for a wide variety of reasons. Some people watch because they might not have the time to play through a game again, but still want to re-experience it without picking up a controller. Others might watch to see how someone else goes through the game. Perhaps they want to learn a new strategy or two, or maybe they are stuck at a certain part and need guidance on how to proceed. Others will watch to see if it is a game they might actually want to play, and some watch just to hear what opinions the commentator has about the game. Other viewers simply want a dose of nostalgia and someone to relate to at the same time.

 

Something else to consider outside the realm of entertainment is that playthroughs in any form have made text walkthroughs and FAQs mostly obsolete. No longer do you have to wade through pages and pages of unnecessary fluff to find what you are looking for--you can simply skip to whatever part in a video you are stuck at or have a question about. You can also use these videos to make comparisons with other versions without having to spend ages researching the subject. They are useful tools in a number of ways and this is important to acknowledge.

 

These videos obviously aren't for everyone, but the issue is not black or white and they most certainly have their place. Calling a subset of people dispassionate because they make these types of videos is highly ignorant.

 

I agree on the 'longplay' bit. Admittedly I only enjoy about 15% of the ones that I've seen, but they can be entertaining/educational.

 

And yes, you obviously (should) know what you're getting into with these....it's the same as clicking on a video titled 'Learn to speak Mandarin the EASY way!', it's right there in the title, kids...

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So then, how exactly should this supposed "passion" you speak of specifically be conveyed in a video? Should it only be relegated to talking about old times and being nostalgic about one's childhood? The reason I ask is, when you take out the collecting and gameplay videos, there's not much else left for the taking.

 

 

I may be biased because I fall into this category (i.e., I have actual experience making said videos), but with that I also see the other side of the equation.

 

The biggest thing that should be understood is that people watch these types of videos for a wide variety of reasons. Some people watch because they might not have the time to play through a game again, but still want to re-experience it without picking up a controller. Others might watch to see how someone else goes through the game. Perhaps they want to learn a new strategy or two, or maybe they are stuck at a certain part and need guidance on how to proceed. Others will watch to see if it is a game they might actually want to play, and some watch just to hear what opinions the commentator has about the game. Other viewers simply want a dose of nostalgia and someone to relate to at the same time.

 

Something else to consider outside the realm of entertainment is that playthroughs in any form have made text walkthroughs and FAQs mostly obsolete. No longer do you have to wade through pages and pages of unnecessary fluff to find what you are looking for--you can simply skip to whatever part in a video you are stuck at or have a question about. You can also use these videos to make comparisons with other versions without having to spend ages researching the subject. They are useful tools in a number of ways and this is important to acknowledge.

 

These videos obviously aren't for everyone, but the issue is not black or white and they most certainly have their place. Calling a subset of people dispassionate because they make these types of videos is highly ignorant.

Hmmm, I've never looked at play through videos in the context of them being a form of visual walkthrough/guide. I rather see your point on that matter, you've made a very compelling analogy by comparing such with the traditional written and typed walkthrough. I will personally never regard a written walkthrough as being obsolete, but will agree with your point that it could offer a struggling player of a game the chance to see what it is they've been missing to get beyond certain points. Rather interesting.

 

And, I wasn't knocking side-by-side comparison videos of games that appear on multiple platforms. Those tend to be interesting to see, especially when shopping for such a title and wondering which version would be the best to get.

 

As Tanooki said though, there are those people who make gameplay, non-review, videos and end up yammering away about stuff unrelated to to game at hand and those are highly annoying. For a long time I would pull up QIII, UT, and CS matches to have running on the screen at work while doing other things just to keep the monitor from going to sleep. The players who added no audio, or talked in-game strategy I had no issue with, but the morons who would go off on tirades over their personal life issues and in-game guild issues got skipped over for viewing really quick.

 

Collecting videos are one thing, I believe I effectively conveyed my discord for those "flippers" who go out and buy games cheap for the explicit purpose of reselling them, typically while bragging about how much profit they're going to make and telling you go check their Ebay store. Those people drive me nuts, moreso since I tend to run into at least one every Saturday that I go out to see the local yard sales. In contrast to the actual collector's who go make "hunting" videos that while still brag about their finds are genuinely ecstatic about adding to their collection, those I actually do like watching from time to time.

 

Also do occasionally watch game review videos, LE/CE box opening videos, collection show off videos, and "how to" videos on troubleshooting and repairing issues with the systems and accessories. System and game launch videos where they film the lines waiting to get the whatever at midnight releases tend to be interesting to watch to. I even did a couple Switch launch videos myself, nothing fancy, just to be able to say I'd done it once in my life.

 

So let me be very clear about the "passion" aspect itself. There are many different kinds of "passion". Many a YouTuber has gone into making videos not because they are passionate about their chosen video topicality but rather out of a passionate desire for fame and potential fortune. Others are evolved forms of forum trolls 100% passionate about being as big of a disruption to the gaming community as trollingly possible. And the aforementioned flippers tend to be purely "passionate" about their revenue, both from flipping games and YT channel views. And this is why I specified, but apparently wasn't very clear previously, when I said "There are many YouTubers I have watched that I feel are passionate about the games and the collecting hobby". So to clarify I didn't mean to imply all the YouTubers who make videos aren't necessarily passionate about their videos, they just aren't all passionate for the same reasons.

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Well I don't think there's much value (none) with what you said above about the scum who just make a video to brag, talk up their savings, and then go ahead and shove it up on various sales places. That's just sleazy, also fairly stupid if someone catches the video as they hopefully would get blasted over bragging then gouging as it's a douchy thing to do. Sure if you wanted something and got a solid deal on it, great, be happy. I've done it (in text, sometimes picture too.) Days ago I got back Skies of Arcadia Legends GC for $45, a game that can easily go for $65-70+ so I was pretty thrilled a local had it, but I was also happy just to pay the ebay rate on a couple of $5 cheapos figuring the shipping in just because I ran across them because they're good games.

 

Most my passion has been gutted from a lot of this and as such I do other things now in and out of it, but I do have my interests still. I never figured I'd own flash kits much again, and I'm up to 3 and considering +2 more at this point and the grumbling in this thread is a considerable portion of why given who is being blamed as it's a fair target. Why bother right when you don't care about being a shelf queen about stuff if you can slip someone a $100 and get a full flash kit and stuff the games on there. Paid $90(USD converted) to RetroHQ months ago for a SNK Neo Geo Pocket SD Kit, despite the system not having a huge amount of games I weighted it directly against $100+ for Rockman and Cotton I once owned but the $100-150+ for English Evolution and Faselei as well on top of other odd goodies to explore. Runs the same, plays the same, looks the same...on a microSD card. Not to say there isn't a game or two on that, gameboy, or SNES I wouldn't still buy if I loved it enough and the price was right, but this dodges the stupidity almost entirely.

 

Some stuff you can't kit out so easily or at all, like say Gamecube on its hardware. That one I'd say get the HDMI v2 device as they roll out, and the discs you like being wise about it.

 

Perhaps it's time someone does an education/inspirational video series on buying in this current market and how to perhaps in various ways dodge the prices or be patient to get it where you want it and how to deal with the chance of not at all. They're games, not geneva convention necessities. :)

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So then, how exactly should this supposed "passion" you speak of specifically be conveyed in a video? Should it only be relegated to talking about old times and being nostalgic about one's childhood? The reason I ask is, when you take out the collecting and gameplay videos, there's not much else left for the taking.

 

This reminds me of discussions/debates over what makes a gamer "hardcore." I think someone who plays a game exclusively for years, like the guys in Kings of Kong, or the people who play DOTA or WOW are "hardcore." I would guess Sony and Microsoft would prefer people who buy a lot of product, and would refer to their best customers as "hardcore." Maybe a Twitch or YouTube streamer with a lot of viewers (and therefore advertisers) could earn that title as well.

 

Austin also makes another good point longplay = visual gamefaq! At least the walkthrough part. I still mostly prefer the printed guide when they exist. :)

 

I'm a little bit sad when I think that the many-page, ASCII-art-filled written FAQs of the 1990s are pretty much dead. They're easy to search, store, distribute, much more so than video. Some information is best conveyed with video.

 

As Tanooki said though, there are those people who make gameplay, non-review, videos and end up yammering away about stuff unrelated to to game at hand and those are highly annoying. For a long time I would pull up QIII, UT, and CS matches to have running on the screen at work while doing other things just to keep the monitor from going to sleep. The players who added no audio, or talked in-game strategy I had no issue with, but the morons who would go off on tirades over their personal life issues and in-game guild issues got skipped over for viewing really quick.

 

It never occurred to me to have a game (or video of a game) working as a screen saver -- except when I have, using the super-primitive Nethack in that way. Has anyone ever hacked in random videos as Windows screen savers?

 

The yammering doesn't appeal to me in the least, either -- but clearly there's a community of people who dig it, otherwise there wouldn't be Twitch or YouTube Gaming or a few other platforms like it. What really baffles me are the people who go on camera just to speak their mind to a very small audience in an unrehearsed way. The top post of this well-traveled thread falls into that category. It's funny to me that most people are talking about the subject line, and probably haven't watched it. Kudos to OP for the interesting topic.

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We're in agreement. I still vastly prefer them. I go to longplay if I can't quite figure out what someones overly rambling or not clearly written out steps to do (say a run through a maze like dungeon) something makes things worse. A video will clear that up pretty fast. I buy old guides as well, still love them as a primary because of the images and usually very helpful splayed out maps for spaces. Any game I own I will copy a FAQ online to my computer even if I have a print guide because if it's something fast a Ctrl+F (whatever in box) is faster than pulling a book out and finding the page somewhere. I used to write a few faqs back in the day along with some ascii/ansi type art in guides or just for fun including some via mIRC in b&w or color. It's blocky but you can do a lot of really nice stuff with it if you try.

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The litmus test for hardcore or not is easy - if your identity is wrapped up in a hobby, you're a hardcore (hobbyist). My identity isn't defined by the time I spend playing games or collecting stuff, so I don't view myself as particularly hardcore. I have classwork, family, my full-time job, and my guitar all competing for my attention. Variety is the spice of life.

 

That said, I do find myself envious of the hardcore from time to time. I've poured a ton of money into several hobbies in my life and if I could have redirected it all into one, or just not spent that money, then hey so much the better. I do still plan to buy a $4000 PRS Custom 24 someday, though. :-D

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Well reading again some of the enlightening posts here I do think I will continue my passion for videos as a hobby.

 

I also though think its about time someone talk about how Fidget Spinners are destroying perfectly good time that could be spent gaming though.

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The last 12 pages, in summary:

 

Are YouTubers ruining retro gaming?

Nah, there's not really any relationship between the two, and sometimes you will learn something new.

 

Are YouTubers ruining retro game collecting, by driving up prices?

Maybe.

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I can't believe that there are actually people (watchers), who send YTers games and stuff for free, even paying the expensive P&P. Are they mad?

I've received lots of free stuff over the past few years from fans and friends on YT. I've also given stuff away to friends and other channels I like. Would rather give a game to a friend or channel I respect instead of selling it.

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I guess if you have unlimited funds that's fine, but I usually need to sell off stuff to pay for other stuff. I gotta pay the bills and stuff. Dad (me) needs to rank last on the monetary depth chart. Kids don't pay for themselves like they used to. I miss the "free flow of child labor" days.

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It isn't really about unlimited funds as much as priorities I think... I live in the USA, and basically almost any working adult is rich compared to most any place I have lived. Not knocking anyone for their priorities though. I take care of my son first of course, but if I choose to share something with someone else, be it a close friend, or a YouTube personality, it will be a gesture of kindness from the passion of a shared hobby. (though I admit I've not sent people I've watch on YouTube anything unless I knew them pretty well through a Forum like this.

 

MrBlackCat

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Not for me. If it wasn't for Mark at Classic game room I wouldn't be posting this on an Atari Forum. Classic game room started me on my Retro gaming journey, and I'm thankful for it!

Edited by adamchevy

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Are YouTubers ruining retro game collecting, by driving up prices?

Maybe.

 

Not maybe, that's a no as well. Their viewers with money to burn are driving up prices.

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I guess if you have unlimited funds that's fine, but I usually need to sell off stuff to pay for other stuff. I gotta pay the bills and stuff. Dad (me) needs to rank last on the monetary depth chart. Kids don't pay for themselves like they used to. I miss the "free flow of child labor" days.

 

There is a troubling trend happening where kids don't want to work but they want money to buy games, toys, clothes etc.

Parents need to stop this before we have an entire generation that feels entitled to the good things in life without working for it.

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There is a troubling trend happening where kids don't want to work but they want money to buy games, toys, clothes etc.

Parents need to stop this before we have an entire generation that feels entitled to the good things in life without working for it.

 

Some of this is tongue-in-cheek. My daughter is nine. She pays for herself around the house but she's not getting a job yet. LOL

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To be fair my kids were all forced to work crap butt jobs for several summers to learn the value of not money but knowing that work is not necessarily an easy or wanted thing but that it can also be rewarding. So my soon to be off to college child is looking for gainful employment with something that's not just packing groceries or painting ore even worse lawn work. Good thing though is he already has work experience on his resume for the next job and that in itself can be a huge booster to better spots in the work world.

 

Oh and none of my kids want to spend money on games. They wait until birthdays or holidays typically to then use the cash from that to get what they want as well. Only my daughter has no real sense of money and work at the moment but her time will come soon to work that crappy job ha ha.

 

Oh and then we will make videos and throw in games of no value to make them seem more rare and ruin gaming on youtube.

 

See what I did there stay on topic right.

tenor.gif

Edited by Professor Gull
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I usually prefer watching youtubers with some years behind them. I grew up on the NES / SNES as I was born in the mid 80s. I've read a lot about the history of Nintendo and Sega and watched a few documentaries on the Atari years but I don't know a lot about pre-late 80s gaming in general so I enjoy anyone that can thread that in. There are a few I enjoy and watch regularly and if anything it makes me more excited to look for new old stuff. It's also way easier if someone else riffles through all the games and lets me know what to look out for. The idea that more people talking about a hobby ruins it is a little off to me. I spent a lot of time at punk shows growing up and they had the same mentality. If you enjoy it and you don't annoy me, it's all good. If you enjoy it and do annoy me, I'll go elsewhere. And going elsewhere is way easier when there's more in the mix.

 

I also get a kick out of seeing how other's arrange their stuff. I picked up a few handheld stands after seeing them on a MetalJesusRocks video. Sure, generating more interest and thus consumers will cause prices to rise, but that's just part of growing the niche. I'd rather have more cool folks than a wall of $3 games, but that's me.

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I was watching MetalJesusRocks video about the 8bitdo Controllers

 

He got 6 for free, Wow -- I like to review alot of stuff on my Channel

 

 

Metal Jesus is one of these YouTubers who is in loooove with free stuff.

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