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Rick Dangerous

Favorite Operating Systems of all time?

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Strangely enough, that leads into why Be ported the OS to x86, and why Microsoft later strongarmed hardware manufacturers into keeping Be out of the bundled-OS marketplace: after the NeXT acquisition, Apple suddenly weren't interested in cooperating with Be as regards technical information necessary to port the PPC version of BeOS to the G3 architecture. Be went to x86 as a result, and... Despite (or, depending on how you look at it, because of) massively increased interest in and uptake of the OS as a result, they still got screwed.

 

.....

TuneTracker is a pretty damn awesome piece of software. But if there's one thing in BeOS that I really, Really, REALLY miss, it's Replicants. Being able to basically shove data from any application to any other application completely seamlessly was so damn useful at times.

 

Just a correction: IBM and Motorola owned and still own the PPC Architecture. Apple was a customer to both Motorola and IBM for PPC hardware. I know for sure all the PPC hardware specs were available to Be. What was not available to Be was Apple's PPC firmware. I helped develop PPC hardware (for PC, servers, workstations and embedded) during the time and know all too well Apple's tactics.

 

Oh and I miss the querying functionality similar to a relational database with the BFS. It was just so cool you can go to the command line and access all your files and metra data .. and script it all. I really wish there was a modern filesystem with this as our modern solution is create a relational database.

Edited by thetick1

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Just a correction: IBM and Motorola owned and still own the PPC Architecture. Apple was a customer to both Motorola and IBM for PPC hardware. I know for sure all the PPC hardware specs were available to Be. What was not available to Be was Apple's PPC firmware. I helped develop PPC hardware (for PC, servers, workstations and embedded) during the time and know all too well Apple's tactics.

Yep, that's pretty much exactly why BeOS never made it to the G3.

 

Oh and I miss the querying functionality similar to a relational database with the BFS. It was just so cool you can go to the command line and access all your files and metra data .. and script it all. I really wish there was a modern filesystem with this as our modern solution is create a relational database.

Me too. Nothing else really comes close.

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Yep, that's pretty much exactly why BeOS never made it to the G3.

 

 

The G4 Power Mac QuickSilver was the last Apple product I own as it was the last Apple project I contributed. I have not bought ANYTHING Apple ever since and nor will I ever buy an Apple product ever again. I have to admit I have used AppleWin and Apple MESS emulators a few times though.

 

Oh back to BeOS or what we have left of BeOS:

Anyway every now and then I still tinker with the HaikuOS daily build VMs. In another 5 years I expect to see the first HaikuOS beta as those guys have the project management skills of a typical 5 year old. I have never seen so much feature creep in my life. Hopefully I didn't offend anyone.

Edited by thetick1

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Well, to be fair too, Be's OS team was larger than Haiku's team, of which many of the Haiku people are very much part time (I bumped into the guys at Be that moved over to Eazel in the early '00s, and we talked shop, more than a few times..)

 

Haiku's own fate is that of most community driven free software projects: People who refuse to be managed, and people who would be bad at it if they attempted to manage. It's a very tough thing for those who are usually attracted to open source development because of: (I can work on what I wish), to suddenly will themselves to be managed and to undertake deadlines, etc... they work on what they feel is cool, and if that means that a project takes 20 years to complete? ... them's the breaks.

 

-Thom

Edited by tschak909
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Well, to be fair too, Be's OS team was larger than Haiku's team, of which many of the Haiku people are very much part time (I bumped into the guys at Be that moved over to Eazel in the early '00s, and we talked shop, more than a few times..)

 

Haiku's own fate is that of most community driven free software projects: People who refuse to be managed, and people who would be bad at it if they attempted to manage. It's a very tough thing for those who are usually attracted to open source development because of: (I can work on what I wish), to suddenly will themselves to be managed and to undertake deadlines, etc... they work on what they feel is cool, and if that means that a project takes 20 years to complete? ... them's the breaks.

 

-Thom

 

Yea I know as I have contributed to open source when I was working on commercial products and also some new/unstable Linux drivers and related apps (my ESS sound card and ATI TV tuner card). I also contributed on enabling early ppc linux. Also Linux and AIX ports of gnu app builds for IBM workstations.

 

What upsets me about the HaikuOS devs is they have such a great foundation and codebase. They should create official alpha and beta releases. Most of their nightly builds are pretty stable. They need to poke interest in the "causal" geeks like most people here who like to tinker. I should be seeing on slashdot or OSNews.. new alpha/beta Haiku to try out.. not just the routine daily VM build for the hard core developers .. Argh.

Edited by thetick1

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Windows 98 and DOS.

 

I bought a 486DX/33 with Win 3.1 back something like 10 years ago just to play the library of DOS games I had accumulated.

 

Windows 98 ran perfectly for me - if only Windows 95 has USB support I would choose 95.

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Windows 98 ran perfectly for me - if only Windows 95 has USB support I would choose 95.

 

Later Windows 95 installs OEM Service Releases had USB support that worked fine.

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Later Windows 95 installs OEM Service Releases had USB support that worked fine.

 

That's interesting, I didn't know that. I'll check that out.

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I still have an old Linux and Windows 95 dual boot on my Libretto laptop from 1997. Mine is a 100CT but image below is an older 70CT model. USB is on the docking station as USB is not built into the laptop.

 

Here are the specs.. shipped with Windows 95 OSR and functional USB.

https://support.toshiba.com/support/staticContentDetail?contentId=637867&isFromTOCLink=false

 

libr3.jpg

Edited by thetick1
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Later Windows 95 installs OEM Service Releases had USB support that worked fine.

 

Look for "Windows 95 OSR2.5."

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Look for "Windows 95 OSR2.5."

Yep. I dug that CD from my ancient stack of CD-ROM. "Windows 95 OSR2.5." is what is stamped on the CD-ROM.

 

I used this Windows for many years as it was far more stable than original Windows 95, 98, ME or Vista. Windows 2000 was pretty stable but I only used that at work. When got my last labtop previous to one I have now I got "XP" as it was pretty stable.

 

I also check that USB Supplement to OSR2 released Aug 27th, 1997.

Edited by thetick1

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So I'm finally going to upgrade from Snow Leopard 10.6 tonight (the highest my Macbook can run is El Capitan 10.11).

 

Snow Leopard is the best OS I've ever run, and I don't want to upgrade, but Microsoft disabled Skype for 10.6 a while back, and even though I found a hack that could keep it working, they've now even disabled the hack from working. And I have to call my mother. Sigh. Plus, I think I've gone a long as I could with out-of-date browsers. Some sites are starting not to work properly.

 

I was going to maybe buy a new computer instead of upgrading at all, but I don't have time or money right now and I need to wait and see what Intel does about this mega-bug they found.

 

So goodbye Snow Leopard. :_(

 

Boooooooooo.

Edited by BillyHW

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Oh back to BeOS or what we have left of BeOS:

Anyway every now and then I still tinker with the HaikuOS daily build VMs. In another 5 years I expect to see the first HaikuOS beta as those guys have the project management skills of a typical 5 year old. I have never seen so much feature creep in my life. Hopefully I didn't offend anyone.

 

As an actual creep, I am offended by being likened to a 5-year old project manager!

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Later Windows 95 installs OEM Service Releases had USB support that worked fine.

 

 

As I recall, OSR2 did have USB support (scanners, printers, etc), but not to be confused with USB mass storage device support. In other words, it still did not have drivers for USB sticks to work. You can get them to work with hackery drivers sometimes, but it wasn't until ME and 2K that USB drives actually worked without the need for that.

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As I recall, OSR2 did have USB support (scanners, printers, etc), but not to be confused with USB mass storage device support. In other words, it still did not have drivers for USB sticks to work. You can get them to work with hackery drivers sometimes, but it wasn't until ME and 2K that USB drives actually worked without the need for that.

 

Well yes the default USB drivers did not include USB mass storage driver. No hackery was needed just install third party USB mass storage driver that worked fine. I can't recall where I got the one I used but I know there were different vendors with their own USB mass storage driver.

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Well yes the default USB drivers did not include USB mass storage driver. No hackery was needed just install third party USB mass storage driver that worked fine. I can't recall where I got the one I used but I know there were different vendors with their own USB mass storage driver.

 

Didn't they load right from the USB device itself in many cases? Maybe my recollection is jumbled.

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Didn't they load right from the USB device itself in many cases? Maybe my recollection is jumbled.

 

I honestly can't remember if I downloaded them or if the came with the device.

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I honestly can't remember if I downloaded them or if the came with the device.

 

I remember one of the alleged benefits of USB as it was preached back in the early days was that it would be a driver-less system as all of the devices would either fit into one of the defined classes or would have a special area in the device set aside to provide the driver to the system.

 

In the end we got half of that. IIRC, even in Windows 98SE I had to install some mass storage driver to use my SanDisk 128MB stick. After that, though, most of my other SanDisks worked.

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