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Bill Loguidice

Why I decided to auction off my outsized, decades-built collection

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I feel that by eliminating a lot of duplications and spares from my Apple II stash I'll enjoy it even more. That and getting rid of a lot of extraneous ebay accumulations. The only duplications I think I'm interested in keeping are tiny parts, screws, fittings, some mechanical parts.. It is a mental burden unless you stop thinking about it entirely. And then what's the fun in that?

 

I'm thinking I may not need duplicate consoles now. Because they don't see much usage and are not likely to wear out. Most of the important stuff I currently want to do can be done in AppleWin, Copy II+, and Ciderpress, through emulation.. A few physical consoles could serve as genuine sentimental items, placeholders, for when I want to look back fondly on the old times. Or the occasional need to test something on real hardware.

 

---

 

With digital hoarding, think mirroring the Asimov site + my own 4,000 disks, all of it can be contained in a mouse-sized box. And when you're done playing with it, you CAN forget about it. Need more space? Make a new folder, fresh workspace! And you can instantly come back at any time. No mess. No fuss.

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I've written previously (on other forums) about the dangers of letting your collection turn into a hoard.

 

Do you think you could post some links to read?

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Since discovering everdrives and other multicarts, my collection now consists of original hardware and one multicart for each system. Perhaps that may be a way for you to de-clutter and still enjoy the old games on original hardware. Good luck on whatever you decide to do.

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Since discovering everdrives and other multicarts, my collection now consists of original hardware and one multicart for each system. Perhaps that may be a way for you to de-clutter and still enjoy the old games on original hardware. Good luck on whatever you decide to do.

 

That is exactly the type of thing I'm doing with the few systems I'm keeping.

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I think I personally have to thank your collection from stopping me to even try to achieve the same.
A decade ago I was really thinking of getting all old clunkers, I started with some consoles first and almost dipped into '80s home computers.
Then I think I saw your excel spreadsheet and all of a sudden I realized that preservation already had a champion and I could focus on what I cared (and a lot of what I really didn't, I just didn't know yet) which was consoles.
[with the exception of an XEGS, GX-4000 and CD32 that are of Home Computer origins I managed to stay away from them and God knows there's a lot of them]

I also feel lucky I got tired quickly of the 8 bits (which I started collecting almost after I had everything else aside an early 7800) way before getting even halfway that and some of the more exotic were out of my reach (Pioneer LaserActive, Apple Pippin ...) although I did manage to get some (FM Towns Marty for example). That kind of stopped me from accumulating even more clunkers that I already had around 2Y ago or so.
I do want to start the sale as well but I want them to be in working order and as my FM Towns Marty has shown it's not a given, I still haven't had the time to fix it albeit I do have the replacement chips already and I am plenty capable of doing the work myself.

I'm flip-flopping between dumping it all out at a Goodwill donation center or fix what needs fixing and invest the time to sell ... but it seems it would take too much time (and I only have some 30 odds consoles albeit some of them in triple copy so the total is a little higher ... you know US/EU/JP variant for when OCD just can't let go).

For now a very young kid and a new demanding job have sucked out almost all the time I had so it's all frozen .... if I may suggest a system worth keeping I believe it to be the NeoGeo AES with NeoSD (yes emulation is pretty spot-on but that one deserves to be played on real hardware imho).

Just to do bean counting, at 600+ machines even if each say fetches an avg of 50US$ it's a 30K auction just in bare console/base-unit HW .... when you add all the extra HW and the SW it's probably gonna reach south of 100K ... at least on paper .... do I have the ballpark right?

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For me, the decision to sell off my stuff was prompted by other issues in my life (stress, and being TOLD to eliminate all sources of it). Having to maintain my small collection wasn't a major source of stress, but a contributing factor. But there were other issues at play too:

  1. Like you, Bill, I started to find that playing with the hardware was more trouble than it was worth. For example, my Amiga had only a base install, and I would have needed to install all the games, tweak everything, etc. Easily would have taken weeks. It started to look like a chore. And when what you're doing is supposed to be a hobby/enjoyable, it becoming a chore means that your heart just isn't in it anymore.
  2. Emulation has become just too damn easy. Over the past few days, I've been testing mice, trackballs, and other controller types on my light-sixer, to diagnose a problem and improve Stella. I forgot just how annoying it is to have to unplug/replug everything each time you want to play a new game. In Stella, you just double-click and you're done. Or for the CD32, you'd have to make separate CDs for each game, then manually change them each time. Yes, first-world problems I'm sure, but once you get used to all digital, it is extremely hard to go back.

So for me, that's how I know that my current sale is my last, and that I won't be re-creating my collection ever again. I've become too used to modern conveniences, and finally come to realize you "can't go home again".

 

My only dilemma is whether to keep my C-128D. It has a flash cart (Ultimate-II), so all of the inconveniences of old hardware won't be an issue. I'm keeping my 2600 and 7800, since I need it for development, and most of it was donated (I don't feel selling donated stuff would be fair to the people that donated it). I may sell my 2600 games, since I never use them because of the Harmony.

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For now a very young kid and a new demanding job have sucked out almost all the time I had so it's all frozen .... if I may suggest a system worth keeping I believe it to be the NeoGeo AES with NeoSD (yes emulation is pretty spot-on but that one deserves to be played on real hardware imho).

 

 

I'm even wavering on keeping the systems I said I was going to keep earlier. I'd love to keep the NeoGeo AES stuff on one level - it's really cool having a true arcade quality system - but as you say, the emulation is pretty good and they regularly re-release the games on new systems. I also can't say there are any personal must-haves on there for me either. I also have a Supergun with an MVS board and multi-cart as an alternative, but again, I just don't think I feel strongly enough about keeping it.

 

 

 

Just to do bean counting, at 600+ machines even if each say fetches an avg of 50US$ it's a 30K auction just in bare console/base-unit HW .... when you add all the extra HW and the SW it's probably gonna reach south of 100K ... at least on paper .... do I have the ballpark right?

 

It's actually just 500+ machines. So, OK, $50 x 500. That's actually really low as I think many will actually go for quite a bit more. So, $25,000. And let's just say there are 2,500 pieces of boxed, good condition computer and console software (it's probably 3,000+, but let's go with the lower number), which is also kind of low considering the vintage and relative rarity of a lot of the stuff. Let's put those at $8 each (between $5 - $10), but again, I think that's also rather low considering many of the titles that will almost certainly drive that price up by a large factor. So, that's another $20,000. So that's $45,000 if things go horribly wrong and you just count the absolute best stuff (there's a ton more to the collection than that, obviously). The auction house gets 25% of the final gross, plus an additional $1,000. I'm also unclear on the tax implications. So my final take in that scenario would be $32,750, not counting any tax implications.

 

Now, my own estimate easily puts the total value with relatively conservative estimates at greater than $100,000. The auction house thinks the total value is likely more (and they would be a good judge on some things and not on others). The key in these things obviously is getting the auction in front of the right people. Will the average Joe know the value of a Personal Software version of Zork for the TRS-80? Will the average Joe know what the hell having a loaded APF MP-1000 Imagination Machine bundle means? Almost certainly not. They'll likely be looking for better known things like Atari 2600 and NES stuff. I obviously have stuff like that, but certainly not in the volumes to make up for getting low prices on the actual "good stuff."

 

I'm realistic here. While I would love a $100,000+ final total (before fees and taxes), I'm prepared for a worst case scenario of half that. Although disappointing, I would have still accomplished my primary goal.

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Since discovering everdrives and other multicarts, my collection now consists of original hardware and one multicart for each system. Perhaps that may be a way for you to de-clutter and still enjoy the old games on original hardware. Good luck on whatever you decide to do.

That's exactly what I did. The only original software I still have is my Apple II stuff because that was my childhood system (and my 5020 and Lynx boxes because I haven't gotten around to selling those yet).

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Since discovering everdrives and other multicarts, my collection now consists of original hardware and one multicart for each system. Perhaps that may be a way for you to de-clutter and still enjoy the old games on original hardware. Good luck on whatever you decide to do.

 

That's exactly what I did. The only original software I still have is my Apple II stuff because that was my childhood system (and my 5020 and Lynx boxes because I haven't gotten around to selling those yet).

 

Same here. 5 systems with one cart each, one system with Free McBoot and a HDD(forgot about that one when I posted the first time) and my 3DO but only reason I keep that is Gex and Star Control II. (BEST. PORT. EVER.)

Edited by ClassicGMR
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Wow.

 

Just read this thread. You had a significant collection , Bill. You could have been considered a curator. It's a pity there isn't a museum somewhere that could have bought the whole lot. There are a few computing museums in the UK but they mostly exist on contributions. I think they do have a modest budget but their main cost is storing and maintaining what they have and they are kept going by volunteers.

 

I had a clearout about 2 years ago - nowhere near the same scale. In the main I got rid of games I knew I was never going to play and also a pile of peripherals I would never use. Dropped my collection from 800 games to 500 and it's now a tight focussed collection of genres I really like and play. I still love original packaging so I'm not sure I will ever have a total clearout - never say never though.

 

As many say here , it was liberating. I extended my house 2 years ago and got a small dedicated room for my stuff so I wanted my collection to fit graciously without the place becoming a dump so that was another motivation. All my games now fit neatly into a corner of the room on Ikea shelving.

 

Kept the CRT - just couldn't part with that - love the image I get with it on pre Dreamcast consoles. I have them neatly set up with permanent-connections via a quality RGB SCART powered switch so everything is accessible and usable which is important to me. Have kept a nice Sony LCD screen for the Dreamcast and PS2 in the room as well.

 

One significant change is I am not buying lots of stuff any more. I have bought a few choice titles over the last 2 years - maybe about 6 games - and that has sometimes been a situation where I have traded so my collection isn't growing. My collection is now more or less complete for my needs. I have still to jump onto the Switch wagon - but the only reason I would do that would be to play MK8 Dx with the family. I have no desire to collect any more than what I have.

 

I do foresee one scenario where I would get rid of most of everything - I have the room for some arcade cabinets - I'm in a queue for a reconditioned Asteroids Deluxe. If that happens and the experience is good then I would consider supplementing it with a really nice JAMMA cab and offloading the whole lot. Would need to think long and hard about that though.

Edited by davyK
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Wow.

 

Just read this thread. You had a significant collection , Bill. You could have been considered a curator. It's a pity there isn't a museum somewhere that could have bought the whole lot. There are a few computing museums in the UK but they mostly exist on contributions. I think they do have a modest budget but their main cost is storing and maintaining what they have and they are kept going by volunteers.

 

I considered starting my own museum, but that's not an insignificant undertaking and not necessarily something I'd have a passion for. In terms of an existing museum buying my stuff, I tried. There was some interest, but not in the full collection. I saw no point in letting a museum pick and choose the best stuff and then leave me to deal with what to do with tons more stuff still. Although doing what I'm doing is not necessarily ideal, it takes care of 100% of my collection, as well as some bonus stuff, and doesn't involve a tremendous amount of time (which I don't have) or effort from me.

 

Good to hear you went through your own downsizing.

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I considered starting my own museum, but that's not an insignificant undertaking and not necessarily something I'd have a passion for.

 

How many classic gaming/computer museums can the country really support? There seem to be a lot of them these days including the huge one in Texas the DP guys started up. Personally I'd just like to be the curator at one, not start one. :)

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How many classic gaming/computer museums can the country really support? There seem to be a lot of them these days including the huge one in Texas the DP guys started up. Personally I'd just like to be the curator at one, not start one. :)

 

I certainly agree to a point. There are some good ones out there already, and certainly many that struggle for support. At the same time, I also think there is still some room for some innovation in this area, including ones focused more on play/interaction, as well as to the polish of a more traditional museum. It's a challenge either way, though. I mean, would that many people really be interested in seeing deconstructed packaging, including manuals, feelies, disks, warranty cards, etc.? That stuff is undeniably cool for a subset of us, but perhaps not undeniably cool for a population of visitors beyond that. The main challenge is that unlike many other types of museum artificats, to really appreciate this stuff, you have to use it/feel it/play it/interact with it. That's not necessarily a specialty of a museum setting/format.
Selfishly, as much as I entertained the idea of starting my own museum, it ultimately was about getting the stuff out of my house and in a setting where it would be more usable. Again, there are lots of practical reasons why that was never going to work. Really, I was more pointing out that I tried to explore every possibility for doing something with an overly large collection. Why I didn't think an auction house would be an option previous to the other AtariAge thread on here is beyond me. It just never came up for whatever reason.

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I do foresee one scenario where I would get rid of most of everything - I have the room for some arcade cabinets - I'm in a queue for a reconditioned Asteroids Deluxe. If that happens and the experience is good then I would consider supplementing it with a really nice JAMMA cab and offloading the whole lot. Would need to think long and hard about that though.

 

This is a little something I myself would be thinking twice on - because while a single-game arcade cab is cool and all for the nostalgia, it is only one game. It consumes a lot of space. Most of which is empty air.

 

That's just me. I prefer my videogame 'hobbyspace' be filled with richness and density. A lot of stuff in a tiny spot. This means a few select meaningful (to me) systems, and some PC's to support emulation.

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This is a little something I myself would be thinking twice on - because while a single-game arcade cab is cool and all for the nostalgia, it is only one game. It consumes a lot of space. Most of which is empty air.

 

That's just me. I prefer my videogame 'hobbyspace' be filled with richness and density. A lot of stuff in a tiny spot. This means a few select meaningful (to me) systems, and some PC's to support emulation.

 

This is what has always kept me from finally taking the arcade/pinball route. If I saw a Joust cabinet (favorite game) cheap, or by some miracle, found a bargain priced a Joust head to head pinball (never happen), I'd probably have a failure of willpower/common sense, but other than that I don't even consider cabs or pinball any more. Joust I won't get sick of...but everything else, I would.

 

(And MAME cabs just don't hold any juice for me)

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I really am done with the collecting. I think I got it all out of my system.

 

 

Perfectly stated. This is the gist for me as well. It's out of my system. I started selling off a good chunk of my collection a couple years ago and am transitioning to flash carts. I still have a lot more to sell off but needed a break after my previous purge. Good luck with your auctions!

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This is what has always kept me from finally taking the arcade/pinball route. If I saw a Joust cabinet (favorite game) cheap, or by some miracle, found a bargain priced a Joust head to head pinball (never happen), I'd probably have a failure of willpower/common sense, but other than that I don't even consider cabs or pinball any more. Joust I won't get sick of...but everything else, I would.

 

(And MAME cabs just don't hold any juice for me)

 

Mame cabs held my interest for parts of the 2010 decade. And real genuine arcade cabs during the 90's. Now my choice is a BarTop or something like Master Phruby's X-Arcade or just a plain old traditional Set Top Box.

 

Thing with mame cabs is they are rather soulless. And the pay ones some arcades setup are just lame-o in the generic sense. Who cares if those play 30 games or 3000 games. 90% are gonna be fighting games.

 

I certainly agree to a point. There are some good ones out there already, and certainly many that struggle for support. At the same time, I also think there is still some room for some innovation in this area, including ones focused more on play/interaction, as well as to the polish of a more traditional museum. It's a challenge either way, though. I mean, would that many people really be interested in seeing deconstructed packaging, including manuals, feelies, disks, warranty cards, etc.? That stuff is undeniably cool for a subset of us, but perhaps not undeniably cool for a population of visitors beyond that. The main challenge is that unlike many other types of museum artificats, to really appreciate this stuff, you have to use it/feel it/play it/interact with it. That's not necessarily a specialty of a museum setting/format.

 

 

A videogame and computer museum focuses on interactive information management appliances, so to speak. Why not present the very information itself. And do it in an interactive style and flair not even the original designers could imagine.

 

Electronic stuff is fast-moving, changing, dynamic, and thus it attracts like-minded folks. The field of videogames is rich in diversity and depth. There are thousands of directions and branches to take. This means a self-guided tour is in order. And that means you need to have a lot of material to satisfy all flavors of curiosity. And it should be presented at a customizable level of detail and speed. Personalization.

 

There's some interest in box art. Little of the art is memorable, most generic. Looking at it in person is just as good as looking at it from a scan. Monitors have high resolutions today and are only getting better. Manuals are almost miniature tour guides for a system. And many books are in-depth technical bibles. They talk about the hardware & software in far more detail than a museum placard ever would.

 

Perhaps a future videogame museum may be no more than a front room vestibule with some artifacts to set the tone. The real exhibit is in a plush sit-down kiosk in a library-like environment. You get food and drink and have control over the ultimate emulator machine that can play every single game ever made. And perhaps even have a holographic projector to see consoles, circuits, and other artifacts in living 3D.

 

It would be updated daily as the digital archaeologists uncover more material. And of course there'd be an auxiliary side screen to display manuals and artwork while you view and play and interact with the software itself. Ohh hell, include a third screen for navigation.

 

It's one thing to look at a console behind a glass window. Another thing to play the actual games on it.

Edited by Keatah

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..."It's one thing to look at a console behind a glass window. Another thing to play the actual games on it".

 

Well said! Exactly what it's like playing with emulators! :lol:

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Hey Bill - if you want to donate or loan anything to a museum - there is the National Videogame Museum in Frisco Texas. (http://www.nvmusa.org) It was founded by Sean Kelly, Joe Santulli and John Hardie. I never heard of this museum until moving last year from south Jersey to this area of Texas. Have not yet been there, but its on the list of things to do.

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Do you think you could post some links to read?

 

Sure, but before I do, the question at that time was "How do I know if I'm a hoarder or not?" You are not a hoarder if:

  • You adhere to limits (financial or otherwise)
  • You know where every item is
  • If you are standing on the same property as your collection, you can physically touch any collection item in two minutes or less
  • Your collection items are not exposed to the elements
To Bill's credit, he met most, if not all, of these conditions.
Some musings:
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There were times (before drones) I had to put a camera on a stick to see up and over the mound of stuff before me. It'd take every bit of half an hour to wade through it, by moving stuff from the front of me to the back of me. One piece at a time.

Edited by Keatah

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Hey Bill - if you want to donate or loan anything to a museum - there is the National Videogame Museum in Frisco Texas. (http://www.nvmusa.org) It was founded by Sean Kelly, Joe Santulli and John Hardie. I never heard of this museum until moving last year from south Jersey to this area of Texas. Have not yet been there, but its on the list of things to do.

I saw most of that stuff at the CGE in Vegas in 2014 and 2012, great collection!

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