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Broken Atari 2600 piece

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A piece of my Atari 2600 broke this morning. Can anyone tell me what the piece is called and the best place to get a replacement. Thank you.

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I agree with CRTGAMER above, but meanwhile you can just strip the end of that where the connector broke off and you can wrap it around the screw and it will work just as good as it did before. You could do that while you wait on better parts so you aren't without a system.

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Or switch to emulation and not worry about any of this crap.

I love playing with the old hardware. I’ve had my system for 36-37 years. Can’t switch to emulation.

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That old coax to spade I forgot all about.. thats how I would hook up my 2600 to my old zenith! I miss you and your uhf dial and how when ya shut her down that little glow in the centre of the screen. Pull the knob for power for another game of missle command.

Crazy thing that my childhood tv still works well 8 years ago I tried... too big to move its the size of a deepfreeze almost.

Edited by Jinks
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That old coax to spade I forgot all about.. thats how I would hook up my 2600 to my old zenith!

Crazy thing that my childhood tv still works well 8 years ago I tried... too big to move its the size of a deepfreeze almost.

From Wiki:

Due to the use of chassis construction (and the high quality components), Zenith televisions and radios of the 1950s to 1970s found today are often still working well, needing little work to restore them to like-new operating condition. For many years, their famous slogan was "The quality goes in before the name goes on."

From Zenith.com:

Founded on radio engineering, Zenith soon became a leader in other consumer electronics developments, such as the first all-electronic TV station (1939), the first FM radio station in the Midwest (1940) and the world’s first subscription TV system known as “PhoneVision” (1947). Zenith pioneered AM and FM radio broadcasting—including the invention of the stereo FM radio broadcast system, authorized by the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) in 1961 and still in use worldwide—and played a key role in developing broadcast standards for black-and-white and color television.

Zenith engineers co-developed the multichannel television sound (MTS) transmission system adopted by the industry for stereo TV broadcasts (1984), and received an Emmy (1986) for pioneering work on development of MTS stereo TV. Other noteworthy Zenith television innovations include TV receivers with “Sound by Bose” (1986) and “Dolby Surround Sound” (1988), as well as the first TVs with built-in closed caption decoders (1991), the first TVs with built-in on screen electronic program guide (1994), and the first TVs with a track-ball operated remote control (1995).

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I love playing with the old hardware. I’ve had my system for 36-37 years. Can’t switch to emulation.

 

Bah ignore Keatah. He's old and cranky and set in his ways ;)

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From Wiki:

Due to the use of chassis construction (and the high quality components), Zenith televisions and radios of the 1950s to 1970s found today are often still working well, needing little work to restore them to like-new operating condition. For many years, their famous slogan was "The quality goes in before the name goes on."

From Zenith.com:

Founded on radio engineering, Zenith soon became a leader in other consumer electronics developments, such as the first all-electronic TV station (1939), the first FM radio station in the Midwest (1940) and the worlds first subscription TV system known as PhoneVision (1947). Zenith pioneered AM and FM radio broadcastingincluding the invention of the stereo FM radio broadcast system, authorized by the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) in 1961 and still in use worldwideand played a key role in developing broadcast standards for black-and-white and color television.

Zenith engineers co-developed the multichannel television sound (MTS) transmission system adopted by the industry for stereo TV broadcasts (1984), and received an Emmy (1986) for pioneering work on development of MTS stereo TV. Other noteworthy Zenith television innovations include TV receivers with Sound by Bose (1986) and Dolby Surround Sound (1988), as well as the first TVs with built-in closed caption decoders (1991), the first TVs with built-in on screen electronic program guide (1994), and the first TVs with a track-ball operated remote control (1995).

I knew they were great!
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It is called garbage and you should replace it with this.

 

https://atariage.com/store

 

/index.php?l=product_detail&p=42

Thank you cpuwiz and all. I got a coaxial adapter and the 2600 is working well. Good to be playing the old hardware again.

Edited by agb
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