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mr_intv

How many original releases are there?

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The source for Playcable being terminated in 1983 is intellivisionlives.com (not always a good source for accurate info). The wikipedia article says several test markets were announced in 1979 and then the service officially launched in 1981. Wikipedia is only as good as its references. It doesn't say how many markets playcable was in 1981 and 1982? By 1983 cable companies might have already started shutting it down before the service officially terminated. At that point Playcable subscriptions were probably low compared to 1981/82.

 

Unlike the not for resale test cartridges and demo cartridges and playcable boxes, Keyboard Components were sold to end users. Mattel obviously had some way to quote a price, accept payment, and ship product directly to consumers. The Keyboard Component was just a product that Mattel did not want to sell, doing the minimum trying to satisfy the FCC. They didn't need anymore test markets in 1982, they knew they were going to kill it, they already had the ECS in the works. Even if engineering did not know this Mattel execs did. Four thousand is a small number; a small number of Spiker cartridges were also produced.

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...I could not care what your personal opinion is .. oh I forgot you are the authority of everything intellivision and what you say rules.

 

Get real, I could not care what your thinking . But go ahead and keep quoted me .

 

Cheers Happy Face Happy Face!!!

 

LOL

 

Wow, what happened to "Love to hear everyone's views on this subject." Passive aggressive much?

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Wow, what happened to "Love to hear everyone's views on this subject." Passive aggressive much?

 

Your wrong, that's exactly what thehatman was doing and as usual one person is singled out...

 

and I was referring to one persons(for just reason's) so I don't know where you got everyone's view..

 

So that statement of yours is so untrue.

Edited by m-crew

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I will not get bullied and not defend myself..

 

I meant what I said,"Love to hear everyone's views on this subject." as you quoted...

 

 

 

Wow for that statement

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Wow, what happened to "Love to hear everyone's views on this subject." Passive aggressive much?

and it seem like your being

 

 

Passive aggressive with your post.

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Unlike the not for resale test cartridges and demo cartridges and playcable boxes, Keyboard Components were sold to end users. Mattel obviously had some way to quote a price, accept payment, and ship product directly to consumers. The Keyboard Component was just a product that Mattel did not want to sell, doing the minimum trying to satisfy the FCC. They didn't need anymore test markets in 1982, they knew they were going to kill it, they already had the ECS in the works. Even if engineering did not know this Mattel execs did. Four thousand is a small number; a small number of Spiker cartridges were also produced.

 

I agree that the PlayCable was not sold to end-users (at best it was rented). However, I wonder about the demo cartridges. It's my understanding that managers at stores could purchase demo cartridges, most likely through mail order from special "catalogs" intended for stores (guessing it was just typewritten on Mattel letterhead). It would not surprise me if these demo cartridges could also purchased any end-user who happened to find out the demo cartridges were for sale. To me at least, this situation would be similar to the KC situation: Mattel made something available to a very constrained market (certain stores versus 3 test market cities) but likely didn't refuse purchases from end-users outside those markets. In both cases, these items were deliberately constrained and not marketed at the general public, thus these items don't seem to belong in the 125 list.

 

It is less likely, but still possible, that the same situation existed for the test cartridges. Mattel might have allowed 3rd party repair companies to repair or at least diagnose Intellivisions, such as TV and electronic repair shops were more common in the 1980s. This might explain why the MTE-201 cartridge, while rare, seems too commonly available to be Mattel-factory-only item (compare today's MTE-201 availability to the IMI Test Cartridge and the Video Test Cartridge availability).

 

Anyways, most of the above is speculation on my part. I have seen no Mattel documentation one way or the other on whether demo or test cartridges were purchased by the general public. The possibility of all this is raised by another company and product that actually did this with their demo cartridge: Hewlett-Packard and their HP-48SX calculator. They create a demo card for in-store demonstration of their calculator but it was available for purchase later on in general public catalogs (note: "general public catalogs" is a major differentiating factor here). While perhaps a bit off-topic, this is what my speculation of Mattel's potential behavior is based off of.

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lLFO46Fp2mM

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FYI, I know that there is some drama with other discussions on this thread.

 

I'll just say that I feel that mr_me and I are having a healthy and respectful discussion, even if we disagree on some points. I am learning a few things here as well. If I have come across as rude or disrespectful, none was intended and I apologize in advance. Call me out on it and I will stop.

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A few thoughts.

 

1. If you see the light and realize you should just collect everything, then it doesn't matter if you count 124, 125, 126....You're complete!

 

2. There are always more variants, soooo.... you're never ever complete. Don't go into the light!

I love this answer to the entire question! :) :thumbsup:

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Aaaaargh! Anyone else having problems getting Netflix to work on their Playcable? This is very frustrating 🤬

I thought I was getting Hulu working but the PlayCable just made a loud squealing noise.

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Aaaaargh! Anyone else having problems getting Netflix to work on their Playcable? This is very frustrating

You have to go to Netflix.com, get an access code, and enter it on your controller keypad.

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Aaaaargh! Anyone else having problems getting Netflix to work on their Playcable? This is very frustrating 🤬

I did get Superchanel and FirstChoice to work on it.

Lol

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I did get Superchanel and FirstChoice to work on it.

Lol

wasnt it actually called Firstchoice Superchannel BITD? :)......but I could be mistaking.....Western Canada has movie central now. Lol

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wasnt it actually called Firstchoice Superchannel BITD? :)......but I could be mistaking.....Western Canada has movie central now. Lol

BITD ,

Yes after they merged to one ,

But at first it was two separate pay Movie stations. 👍🏻

Great catch :)

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I agree that the PlayCable was not sold to end-users (at best it was rented). However, I wonder about the demo cartridges. It's my understanding that managers at stores could purchase demo cartridges, most likely through mail order from special "catalogs" intended for stores (guessing it was just typewritten on Mattel letterhead). It would not surprise me if these demo cartridges could also purchased any end-user who happened to find out the demo cartridges were for sale. To me at least, this situation would be similar to the KC situation: Mattel made something available to a very constrained market (certain stores versus 3 test market cities) but likely didn't refuse purchases from end-users outside those markets. In both cases, these items were deliberately constrained and not marketed at the general public, thus these items don't seem to belong in the 125 list.

 

It is less likely, but still possible, that the same situation existed for the test cartridges. Mattel might have allowed 3rd party repair companies to repair or at least diagnose Intellivisions, such as TV and electronic repair shops were more common in the 1980s. This might explain why the MTE-201 cartridge, while rare, seems too commonly available to be Mattel-factory-only item (compare today's MTE-201 availability to the IMI Test Cartridge and the Video Test Cartridge availability).

 

Anyways, most of the above is speculation on my part. I have seen no Mattel documentation one way or the other on whether demo or test cartridges were purchased by the general public. The possibility of all this is raised by another company and product that actually did this with their demo cartridge: Hewlett-Packard and their HP-48SX calculator. They create a demo card for in-store demonstration of their calculator but it was available for purchase later on in general public catalogs (note: "general public catalogs" is a major differentiating factor here). While perhaps a bit off-topic, this is what my speculation of Mattel's potential behavior is based off of.

...

The Keyboard Component and software were consumer products. Test and demo cartridges were NFR, likely restricted for sale only to authorised retailers and service centers. I can't imagine any kids or parents in 1982 writing Mattel to buy demo or test cartridges. The Keyboard Component was heavily marketed, at least in the beginning. Test markets or not, to the FCC and consumers it was a product and Mattel was forced to deliver. The Keyboard Component and software were consumer products that Mattel was reluctant to sell because they were losing money on them. That's why they didn't produce many. There's lots of rare products out there, the Keyboard Component is one of them. Edited by mr_me

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The Keyboard Component and software were consumer products. Test and demo cartridges were NFR, likely restricted for sale only to authorised retailers and service centers. I can't imagine any kids or parents in 1982 writing Mattel to buy demo or test cartridges. The Keyboard Component was heavily marketed, at least in the beginning. Test markets or not, to the FCC and consumers it was a product and Mattel was forced to deliver. The Keyboard Component and software were consumer products that Mattel was reluctant to sell because they were losing money on them. That's why they didn't produce many. There's lots of rare products out there, the Keyboard Component is one of them.

Maybe the demo and test carts were NFR or maybe they weren't. At this point, we don't know. Other companies _did_ make their demo carts available as consumer products, so there is pecedent. It doesn't matter whether they were popular or whether people were writing into Mattel asking for them.

 

While the KC was originally intended to be a consumer product, in the end it was not made available for the general consumer as a consumer product. If a product never leaves the test market phase, then it does not become a released product. This is why the KC is not counted in the 125.

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You can call Seattle and New Orleans test markets if you like but the fact is Mattel did not. When it came to the Keyboard Component they only called Fresno in 1980 the "test market". They specifically chose a different term to describe New Orleans and Seattle. And that is an internal document, not something to appease the FCC. Regardless, test markets or not, sales were not restricted to those two markets. Keyboard Components were sold to anyone, anywhere by mail order directly from Mattel.

 

Also note that Keith R. describes the KC software as "Released" and listed them along with the 125 and not with the unreleased cartridges. Why did he list them this way? Because they were released while he worked at Mattel Electronics.

 

http://intellivisionlives.com/credits.php

 

Mattel restricting sales of demo and test cartridges to authorised resellers and service centers has nothing to do with the Keyboard Component discussion. But Keith R. did describe demo and test cartridges as "not released to the public" ie. NFR.

 

http://www.intellivisionlives.com/bluesky/games/credits2.shtml

 

Hewlett Packard providing demo and service materials to anyone is not precedence for anything. Some manufacturers choose to maintain strict control over sales and service channels and others do not.

 

None of the above is speculation, they are facts. And these lists should be based on facts. I don't understand what difference it makes that the Keyboard Component and software are considered released. It's just another list. The ECS cartridges are a list. I don't care for the ECS Computer Adaptor so I don't collect those cartridges. [And I've never seen an ECS in a store, to me it was vaporware.] There should be more lists for Intellivision gamers and collectors to reference.

Edited by mr_me

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FYI, I know that there is some drama with other discussions on this thread.

 

I'll just say that I feel that mr_me and I are having a healthy and respectful discussion, even if we disagree on some points. I am learning a few things here as well. If I have come across as rude or disrespectful, none was intended and I apologize in advance. Call me out on it and I will stop.

 

In no way have you come across as rude or disrespectful and neither has anyone else here in regards to posts discussing the actual topic. One person has decided that rational debate suddenly constitutes "bullying" and decided to take a dump on the entire thread because they didn't like what they were reading.

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Im not sure if it has ever been mentioned but how did Intv re release Pacman in the first place? You would think Atarisoft would threaten legal action.

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