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This is sort of on-topic in the off-topic thread, but I did not know where else to place this... and I did not want to start a whole new thread for a single link.

 

 

So, if you've never seen it, or have not checked lately, my collection of TI 'subject 'enhanced' graphics has grown over the years.

<< CLICK HERE >> to take a peek.

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Has anyone interfaced an SD card device (like a Lotharek HxC) to an Adam yet?

 

yes there's a virt drive and a sdcard cart

 

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I know it's a bit late but if you have 80 column support for your terminal program of choice, then connect to towel.blinkenlights.nl on port 23 to see the first movie Star Wars: A New Hope presented entirely in ASCII

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I know it's a bit late but if you have 80 column support for your terminal program of choice, then connect to towel.blinkenlights.nl on port 23 to see the first movie Star Wars: A New Hope presented entirely in ASCII

 

Long long ago when that was first set up it was not completed. I assume by now it is?

 

 

Originally I came here to post about how useful an ultrasonic cleaner is. I picked up a cheap "starter" unit from Harbor Freight for about $30 or so, with in-store discount and weekly coupon. This week I found it is exceptionally useful in cleaning old label goo off cartridge shells, not to mention just cleaning up the plastic, period. Let the cleaning solution heat up to around 160F after a quick degassing cycle, soak the part for about 20 minutes, let it run for about six minutes. An old toothbrush proves helpful afterward, and a rinse in distilled water and a towel dry. Perfection!

 

I have an older DVD which has some kind of schmutz which alcohol and cloth cannot seem to remove. Thinking about letting it take a dip, too.

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Posted (edited)

Have you ever wondered why the "dang" in danger is pronounced differently then dang?

In danger, it is said more like "dane"(like the dog)+"ger"

...

Either danger should really be pronounced more like "DANG"+"er", or the word dang should really be pronounced as "Dan" , with a hard G at the end.

Edited by jrhodes
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Posted (edited)

French origin vs. germanic origin

 

Interesting video on this topic:

Edited by mizapf
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I once read that there are 40 phonemes in English--but that there are approximately 1,500 ways to spell them. . .

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The obvious humor notwithstanding, discussions that question widely varied pronunciations of similarly spelled words irritate me because they invariably ignore the influence of word origin (as pointed out by @mizapf) and usage on pronunciation, particularly for English.

 

...lee

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German pronunciation is more consistent with respect to its writing (of course, once you need to learn the combinations, like "ch", "sch", "pf", the diphthongs like "au", "eu", "ei", or the umlaute "ä", "ö", "ü"), but the reason is that a) German orthography already reflected the consonant shifts that happened earlier, and b) the "Standard German" is, to some extent, a synthetic language whose pronunciation was formed according to its writing. That is, German is pronounced after its spelling, not spelled after its pronunciation. This is because of the numerous dialects, each of which deviates considerably from each other. The standard was once formed as a compromise for everyone in the German sprachraum, and since it represented a variety of German that was uncommon to most of its speakers, everyone had to learn a new pronunciation.

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Posted (edited)

I once read that there are 40 phonemes in English--but that there are approximately 1,500 ways to spell them. . .

 

That's because English is mash-up of the languages of the language of the earliest inhabitants of England+Latin+Old Norse+West Saxonish+Old French(Norman dialect)+a few words from every country England colonized. :-)

 

When the printing press came along, no one had the courage to change traditional spellings which echoed the original language pronunciations even though nobody spoke like that anymore.

 

And so now, as global "lingua franca", we also have no one with the authority to unilaterally change the crappy old spelling.

 

My prediction is that English will slowly simplify as more 2nd language speakers use it than native speakers. (like latin did)

 

That will be painful for the native speakers.

 

Apology if this in the video.. I didn't watch it yet.

 

:grin: EDIT: LOL. Well that was a good video. I was pretty close.

Edited by TheBF

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Although there are many parallels between English and German, a significant difficulty when learning German is that, unlike in English, there are much fewer words of romance origin, and the germanic version was retained instead. Also, during renaissance time, many antique words from Latin or Greek were imported (also indirectly via French) but underwent a loan translation. Many German words (especially those with prefixes) are simply part-by-part translations of classic words.

 

Greek exodos → Latin exitus (ex "out" + ire/itus "go/walk") → German Ausgang ("out-way", "out-walk"), while English "exit" (or "way out", as I saw in England)

Greek eisodos → Latin initus (in + ire/itus) → German Eingang ("in-way", "in-walk")

Latin intrare (intro + ire) → French entrer → English enter, German eintreten ("in-step", "in-walk")

Latin transferre (trans "through, over", ferre "carry, bring") → German übertragen ("over-carry"), whence the noun translatio (Latin ferre has the past participle passive "latum"), English translation, German Übersetzung ("over-setting")

 

Hence, you miss familiar sounding words when you hear German.

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Although there are many parallels between English and German, a significant difficulty when learning German is that, unlike in English, there are much fewer words of romance origin, and the germanic version was retained instead. Also, during renaissance time, many antique words from Latin or Greek were imported (also indirectly via French) but underwent a loan translation. Many German words (especially those with prefixes) are simply part-by-part translations of classic words.

 

Greek exodos → Latin exitus (ex "out" + ire/itus "go/walk") → German Ausgang ("out-way", "out-walk"), while English "exit" (or "way out", as I saw in England)

Greek eisodos → Latin initus (in + ire/itus) → German Eingang ("in-way", "in-walk")

Latin intrare (intro + ire) → French entrer → English enter, German eintreten ("in-step", "in-walk")

Latin transferre (trans "through, over", ferre "carry, bring") → German übertragen ("over-carry"), whence the noun translatio (Latin ferre has the past participle passive "latum"), English translation, German Übersetzung ("over-setting")

 

Hence, you miss familiar sounding words when you hear German.

 

Fascinating stuff. I married a Dutch (Netherlands) girl that I met in high school and so I took up the language so I could participate at their dining room table. :-)

 

To your point, since adding that vocabulary to my "wetware" I can understand much more German now because the Germanic roots are embedded.

(When I try to read German, it works better if I say it out loud because I pronounce it in "Hollandisch") ;)

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I found this on my hard drive today, but I do not remember where I found it. A 'fossil' like this would make a great paper weight.

post-35324-0-94606200-1557975587_thumb.jpg

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TFW you somehow lose your FG99 SD card out of your laptop.

 

post-27864-0-75699000-1558309124.jpg

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TFW you somehow lose your FG99 SD card out of your laptop.

 

Pretty much the same face I made when I borrowed matthew180's CF card from his nanoPEB to load some stuff on, and he says, "Just don't wipe out the first volume." And for whatever reason possessed me, I put the disk image right in volume 1.

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I am ready to purchase a 3D printer. I have all but settled on the XYZ da Vinci for $299, but then I found the upgraded model with the 3D scanner for $799. Is the scanner worth it?

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