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Geoblocking for a 46 year old song ... ?

 

David Bowie, Space Oddity

 

BTW, I was two months late for the Landing on the Moon.

 

No problem. I would have been here sooner but I have been stuck in the 80s.

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have ordered one.

 

 

 

 

In 2015, Marty McFly finds a folded note which he had never before seen. The cover flap reads: "Marty, open 30 years from 1985 and never sooner." written in Doc Brown's hand-writing.

 

Marty opens the note and finds an address, a five-digit code, and the words, "I've done it Marty! You must come right away!"

 

Marty finds the address in a seemingly abandoned yet well-kept industrial area. It is a warehouse: the typical cliched kind of large warehouse, the size of a small aircraft hangar with walls made from pewter-colored corrugated steel, which is part of a much larger building. Marty finds the main double-sliding door which is large enough to allow two tractor-trailers and a freight train to pass through at the same time. To the left of the sliding bay doors is a normal-looking office door with a small window covered in orange-brown grunge and wire mesh, next to which is a covered device roughly the size of a keypad.

 

Marty lifts up the cover to find no key pad. In fact, whatever may have been there looks as if it were ripped out long ago leaving nothing but a few wires. Marty slaps his hands against his side, slumps, and throws his head back, exclaiming "Aw, come on!"

 

At that moment he hears a loud bang, as though someone had hit the floor next to the large sliding doors with a sledge hammer. Marty steps back in surprise, looking at the doors, when the seemingly-destroyed former keypad emits a beep and a voice: "Welcome, Marty McFly. You are expected, and right on time."

 

"Wai... is that my mom's voice?" Marty mutters to himself as the sliding doors begin to part.

 

As Marty watches with a mix of amazement and curiosity, the people-sized door bursts open and out juts the head of Doctor Emmett Brown, with his characteristic look of excitement -- or is it near-constant astonishment -- melded onto his face.

 

"MARTY!" Doc shouts. "Good, you're here! And exactly one minute, two seconds sooner than I had calculated. Considering I calculated this event in 1955 and never double-checked it with updated algorithms, I suppose I should be rather happy to be so close."

 

Marty adopts a look of exasperated curiosity and a pinch of glee at the entire scene. Just then, the bay doors come to a sudden stop with a heavy clank and a thud, catching Marty's attention. He turns back to the people-sized door to see it closed. Doc sticks his head out of the opening between the heavy bay doors and shouts, "Well, don't just stand there... come in!" then disappears back into the warehouse.

 

Marty moves toward the open doors to follow Doc Brown, a bewildered look on his face as he gestures weakly to the keypad-whatever and begins to ask, "Doc, was that my mom's v..."

 

He follows Doc into the darkness of the warehouse. "Doc? Doc?!" he shouts in a whisper. Bright warehouse lights come on and Marty covers his eyes with his arm to shield them from the sudden brilliance. Over his elbow he sees the figure of Doc Brown standing on a platform. He hears Doc yell, "Look, Marty! Look! My greatest achievement yet!"

 

Marty lowers his arm to see a warehouse floor full of new- and polished-looking, shiny DeLorean DMC-12s. He counts about two dozen of them looking as though they came right off the assembly line. Then, far off to the left he sees what looks like the end of a DeLorean assembly line.

 

He drops his arm and turns to face Doc Brown. "Doc! Are you telling me you're mass-producing the time machine? In DeLoreans?!"

 

"NO, Marty, of course not! I figured it out, Marty! I figured out from where my family fortune came. It was these cars, today: the future! You see, at a point in my career when I was working to introduce the flux capacitor into a car in order to reach the 88 miles per-hour necessary to induce the time travel field, I needed two things: something cheaply and readily available, and something which could help contain and shape the flux dispersal for time travel around its body at the optimal level from the flux capacitor. The full stainless steel outer-body of the DeLorean coupled with its unique shape, and the availability of completed builds and parts inventory due to its short production life caused by its incredible unreliability as a consumer vehicle and the industry-wide sales slump, gave me the perfect platform into which to build my time machine! Plus, it had style! So, I had to invest a good bit of my remaining fortune into buying up everything I could before it was destroyed."

 

Marty looks at Doc, puzzled. "But, Doc. I thought you pretty much used up your family fortune developing the flux capacitor and the time machine."

 

"That's true, Marty. True, indeed. But, really, building the car and the flux capacitor was only part of the task. I realized that the money must have come from somewhere. I know my family history fairly well, but the source of the family wealth has always been in question, irrespective of what all the canon movies, books, and cartoons may have said."

 

"What?"

 

Doc quickly moves forward, "Never mind that. But listen! Knowing my family fortune must have come from somewhere extraordinary, I knew I had to be somehow involved and, let's face it, time travel doesn't make money and it can't be turned into a product or service because of all the havoc which can be wreaked onto the time-line. Except this. This, Marty! You see, in the office space beneath and behind me is enough spare parts to build more of the old DeLorean sports car, with the inventory carefully balanced to provide them with replacement parts for many, many years."

 

"Woah, Doc! You mean to tell me that, with your family fortune you purchased up all of the remaining DeLorean cars and parts so that you could take everything into the future and build more cars, then sell them to build up the family fortune which made the purchase of the cars, parts, and construction of your time machine possible in the first place?"

 

"YES, MARTY! YES! Incredible, isn't it? I came up with the idea when I lost consciousness after choking on a Honey Bun at a truck stop cafe in 2002. It all suddenly made sense."

 

Marty's puzzlement deepens, "But, wait, 2002? But I thought you bought everything back in 1983?" Doc interrupts shaking his head back-and-forth quickly, "Never mind that."

 

"Okay, but, Doc, you mean to tell me that, the most unreliable and costly-to-produce sports car ever made... you're going to sell enough of them to make back your fortune, then somehow get that back in time to your family? I mean, can you sell even one?"

 

"Of course, Marty!"

 

"But how?!"

 

Doctor Emmett Brown stands straight up, throws his hands up into the air in a motion of great reveal, looks dead at Marty McFly and yells gleefully: "NOSTALGIA, Marty, NOSTALGIA!"

 

After completing his revelation, narrow spot-lights come on to illuminate a sign above and behind him, which, with a cartoon-like caricature of himself reads

D.E. BROWN'S DELOREAN EMPORIUM

"Bringing your childhood memories back to the future"

 

Marty looks unconvinced. "Nostalgia?" Doc starts to move down the stairs toward him. "Yes, Marty. You see, people have short memories. Especially of things which only existed when they were children. The attached sentiment toward things which no longer exist, the way people today think Friends was a good television show or people who write stuff like this wonder wistfully what ever happened to The Misfits of Science as they stand in line to purchase the complete DVD set of the mullet-wearing MacGyver." Doc finishes just he as reaches Marty and puts his hands on Marty's shoulders to look him right in the eyes.

 

Marty begins to follow along with Doc's logic: "You mean like people who today are trying to graft modern technology like SD cards, VGA monitors, and two-megabyte ROMs onto their TI-99/4A?"

 

Doc's face drops at little as his speech stumbles, "well, not quite that far off the deep end." Excitement returns to his face. "But, don't you see, Marty? People will buy things they remember as children which no longer exist, simply because these things are associated with, or may even be part of, pleasant memories from their past, or escapes from which they derive some kind of pleasure opposing their seemingly-mundane existence of today, or even to supplement the good and richness of their lives."

 

"But, Doc, how do you take crap from the past and polish it up to appeal to the modern consumer?"

 

Doc looks at him more seriously and says even more seriously, "Come on, Marty... Apple's been doing it for well over a decade."

 

With one arm on Marty's opposite shoulder, Doc turns Marty to stand next to him and pulls him close, looking out across the pool of shimmering DeLoreans, their stainless steel bodies shimmering under the giant mercury-vapor lamps buzzing and dangling from the warehouse ceiling. He smiles as he raises his other hand to sweep Vanna White-esq across the vista of glimmering motor vehicles.

 

"Think of it, Marty. With only a few hundred of these available and millions of middle-aged adults who remember them, not to mention the recent fan-fare over a movie trilogy from the same time period in which this very vehicle starred, coupled with the pop-culture "retro" movement making icons of things many of its participants have never even seen in real life; the asking price can be $100,000 and they'll sell like hot cakes. I've even installed an electric engine in it to give it a more power and short-term reliability, with the side-effect of appealing to environmental hipsters. Some people will pay extra for the opportunity to buy one before they're even available! And with the exchange rate between now and my parents' time, even after all the over-head, pay-offs to the unions and government officials, and the payments on this building, I'll still have enough to fund my latest and future projects, as well as all of my past projects."

 

Marty lifts his hand to his forehead, pushing his hair back a little.

 

"Woah, Doc... that's heavy."

 

(Author's note: as a bonus, you have read this entire thing in the voices of Christopher Lloyd and Michael J. Fox. You are welcome.)

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For some weird reason, the flux capacitor was translated into German as the Flux-Kompensator (and is only known by that name), although the verbatim translation would have been Flux-Kondensator.

 

Sometimes I wish the people doing the dubbing would consult some technically knowledgeable people in time ...

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I'm getting absolutely nothing accomplished tonight! I have projects that need to get done, but what am I doing? I'm playing Internet Chess on the Real Iron tonight. It's a freaking blast! I may end up getting my rear served to me on a platter, but DAMN! Never did I think I'd ever be playing Chess over the Internet with another TI'er on the TI!

 

2v9rnrn.jpg

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Greetings 99ers. I am in need of some advice. I have a 23' Coby as monitor for my primary computer, but it has stopped working. It seems to try to turn on but doesn't. Looking at it, it appears as though there's some sort of key to open it up. Is it worth trying to get it fixed, or should I just have it recycled? (I know Coby is out of business now, but, for something that could be as small as a capacitor, that may not matter).

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Greetings 99ers. I am in need of some advice. I have a 23' Coby as monitor for my primary computer, but it has stopped working. It seems to try to turn on but doesn't. Looking at it, it appears as though there's some sort of key to open it up. Is it worth trying to get it fixed, or should I just have it recycled? (I know Coby is out of business now, but, for something that could be as small as a capacitor, that may not matter).

It is always worth opening it up and at least try to repair it. What do you have to lose? Nothing, it doesn't work anyhow. You have a lot to gain if you can fix it, as well as a sense of accomplishment, satisfaction, and confidence.

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Greetings 99ers. I am in need of some advice. I have a 23' Coby as monitor for my primary computer, but it has stopped working. It seems to try to turn on but doesn't. Looking at it, it appears as though there's some sort of key to open it up. Is it worth trying to get it fixed, or should I just have it recycled? (I know Coby is out of business now, but, for something that could be as small as a capacitor, that may not matter).

 

it requires a plastic seperator (basically a plastic strip that is firm enough to get between the peices and twist.. google the model number and "disassemble" probably someone has a youtube on it.. or blog

 

90% of the time it's a capacitor that went bad in the power supply. it may be obvious but replacing them all is a good shotgun fix. I picked up a nice LG 24" tv/monitor out of the trash the other day that required just 2 caps to fix it.. $5 and done.. and all the info to fix it was googleable

 

Greg

Edited by arcadeshopper
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I'm not using it at the present time, but I have a 15" Coby that does the same thing after it's unplugged. It takes about two dozen attempts to turn it on after it's plugged back in and it always works fine after that... that is until it's unplugged or the power goes out.

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it requires a plastic seperator (basically a plastic strip that is firm enough to get between the peices and twist.. google the model number and "disassemble" probably someone has a youtube on it.. or blog

 

90% of the time it's a capacitor that went bad in the power supply. it may be obvious but replacing them all is a good shotgun fix. I picked up a nice LG 24" tv/monitor out of the trash the other day that required just 2 caps to fix it.. $5 and done.. and all the info to fix it was googleable

 

Greg

Pretty cool! Hadn't actually considered replacing them all - probably the way to go - as you seem to know from experience. I'd hate to waste an otherwise good display.

 

 

It is always worth opening it up and at least try to repair it. What do you have to lose? Nothing, it doesn't work anyhow. You have a lot to gain if you can fix it, as well as a sense of accomplishment, satisfaction, and confidence.

Indeed - nothing at all!

 

Thanks fellas. 8)

 

I'll letcha know how it goes - as a result of all this, the TI is without a monitor at the moment so the sooner I can get it fixed the sooner I can I have the real iron back up and running again.

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