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Hi,

I am trying to build my first mod for my 2600.  It is an LED mod.  I am trying to purchase the parts (not much to them) and am curious what does the led have to be rated for the 2600.  All I know is the 2600 takes .5 A and 9 V.  What does that mean for the LED?  The wire is rated for 24 AWG right?

 

This was the site I was going to order off of.

https://canada.newark.com/search?st=led%20red

 

Thanks in the future if anyone responds.

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Simple, tap into ground and 5V, calculate the rating for the LED resistor and solder.  There are calculators online for this.

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You probably just want to buy parts off Ebay or Amazon. Newark tends to charge too much for shipping if your order is too small. 

 

You just need an led, and the right value resistor for 5 volts. Its a really simple circuit to light an led with 5 volts. You can find youtube videos and stuff online to show you how.  

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I use 330 ohm for a red led modern leds even the basic ones are quite bright

Not as cheap a solution, but I've been trying to use 12v LEDs lately. Reason being is that they are designed for 12v but still work with only 5v. But they are much less brighter and more 'Normal' for power LEDs if you ask me. And with them only running on half the rated voltage, they should last quite a bit longer with less fade over time.

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that's not how it works 

These already have current limiting resistors installed in the base with a securing nut for easy installation. Just like an RCA jack. 

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its the current that matters, so yes if a led is setup for X current at Y voltage with Z resistor then changing any of those values will result in more or less light being produced, but it probably wont effect lifespan as its a diode junction, its either on or its not (until you get into LED's that start producing measurable heat, or your letting too much current pass, which produces heat) 

Edited by Osgeld

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its the current that matters, so yes if a led is setup for X current at Y voltage with Z resistor then changing any of those values will result in more or less light being produced, but it probably wont effect lifespan as its a diode junction, its either on or its not (until you get into LED's that start producing measurable heat, or your letting too much current pass, which produces heat) 

Makes sense. I figured since there was less voltage and likely less current that it might extend the normal life of the LED. It about half as bright as they would normally be at that voltage. But thank you for the correction!

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Ok I did a little bit of shopping awhile back but didn't buy the resistor. I have a 12 v orange resistor. According to the site cpuwiz listed I can't get which resistor to get. However on the orange colour forward v is listed as 2. Can someone explain to me? Thanks.

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Ok I did a little bit of shopping awhile back but didn't buy the resistor. I have a 12 v orange resistor. According to the site cpuwiz listed I can't get which resistor to get. However on the orange colour forward v is listed as 2. Can someone explain to me? Thanks.

 

Could please read over what you typed and explain what you are saying, a tad better?

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Ok lol. It was pretty late at night and it still is *ahem* I bought a 12 volt led and don't know what resistor to buy because the site listed says it won't light up. So the forward voltage would be 12 correct? The site says an orange one is 2 which does not make sense to me. The lead voltage would be 9 and diode current would be what? That part I can't figure out.

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a "12 volt" LED is just a normal led with a resistor already attached to it, sometimes its in the wire, sometimes its in the LED itself

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Nothing will blow up?  lol?

 

I used to blow up leds as a kid by over-volting them. POW! What a stink. Not as much of a stink as melting down transistors or the odd transformer or two though.  :D

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