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Gunstar

Why do you still use your Atari?

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I still feel some affection to the very first computer brand and model I had.

I have that affection too, but my first Brand and model was really Timex/Sinclair 1000 (ZX81), And had they kept the Timex/Sinclair line running, or Sinclair to have kept selling in the states themselves (You could mail order zx80 and zx81 before the Timex deal) I may have stayed loyal to Sinclair and been a Spectrum fan. It's still true with my Atari as my second computer, because I consider it my first serious computer with a real keyboard, lots of memory, color and sound, disk drives, etc. in '85 after a year or two with only a ZX81, there was no support for it any longer, no upgrade route with support as the Timex 2068 (Spectrum) went belly up too in the states. I had to find a new computer brand and 128K was all the rage in '85 for 8-bits, and I bought into the new Atari's "power without the price" with the 128K XE. Except for the keyboard (it was still a huge improvement over the ZX81 membrane), no regrets. At least I wasn't ashamed to show the 130XE to friends with C64's, Apple II's and Colecovison's like I was with the Timex/Sinclair 1000. :-o

Edited by Gunstar

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Because computers since then have had less and less personality. And you knew what you had then. Later, with malware and incessant updates, you lost control of your systems. Also, back then you and a few buddies were on the forefront of home computing. So it's nice to revisit those happy times. And retrocomputing feels similar, out of the mainstream, because you know you have something special.

Edited by ClausB
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I have that affection too, but my first Brand and model was really Timex/Sinclair 1000 (ZX81), And had they kept the Timex/Sinclair line running, or Sinclair to have kept selling in the states themselves (You could mail order zx80 and zx81 before the Timex deal) I may have stayed loyal to Sinclair and been a Spectrum fan. It's still true with my Atari as my second computer, because I consider it my first serious computer with a real keyboard, lots of memory, color and sound, disk drives, etc. in '85 after a year or two with only a ZX81, there was no support for it any longer, no upgrade route with support as the Timex 2068 (Spectrum) went belly up too in the states. I had to find a new computer brand and 128K was all the rage in '85 for 8-bits, and I bought into the new Atari's "power without the price" with the 128K XE. Except for the keyboard (it was still a huge improvement over the ZX81 membrane), no regrets. At least I wasn't ashamed to show the 130XE to friends with C64's, Apple II's and Colecovison's like I was with the Timex/Sinclair 1000. :-o

 

I am a Sinclair fan, as well. I ported PLATOTerm to the Spectrum (RS232 and Spectranet), and I have a ZX Omni on the way to use as my primary Speccy machine.

-Thom

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Nostalgia for the games and hardware is of course a part of what drives my interest in the A8s but if that were honestly all there were to it then I would probably only revisit periodically. What really excites me these days is all of the fantastic new hardware and innovations that have surfaced in the last decade. My main 800XL can do everything that I would have ever dreamed for it and more. Still when something new and exciting comes along (like the SDRIVE-MAX), I want to have it just to see what else is possible for these ancient machines. I don't feel that I'm so much stuck in the past with these old machines as I am excited about their future.

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I still use the A8, and other 8-bits, because I am in awe of some of the development done back in the 80's.

It seems to me that programmers today are lazy in comparison.

Today, if the hardware can't handle the software, then the recommended hardware is updated. Back then, if the hardware didn't support the software, the the software was refactored and optimised to work on the hardware. Some games (Lords of Midnight, Rescue on Fratcalus, Alternate Reality) absolutely blew me away, because I knew that the machines were being pushed harder than before. I remember when Doom 3 came out for PC, and the recommended hardware to run it optimally didn't actually exist at the time!!!

 

(Full disclosure, I am a professional programmer, and I am just as lazy as everyone else)

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Learned to code on my 400 "back in 82" (no, I can't throw a football over any mountains). Finally landed a full-time programming job in 2007, and am currently still going at it. I've gone full circle, because to take a break from the modern grind, it's fun to do some 6502 coding on the old machine. Also, I love interfacing such an old machine with modern technology for storage (SD cards for HDD, etc.)

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LOL! After all, it's a manly toy! And I'm just starting to dip my toes into FJC's Machoism. :grin:

 

I use my XEGS because it works, and it's cute :P As long as the "machoism" stays on its' side, I'll continue to do so. ;)

 

Now really, I'd never even saw an A8 until the late 90s and, but had C= growing up and still do. So for me, these A8's are a way of recapturing some of what the experience of it being "new" again. The same games aren't exactly the same, some not even close.

Edited by zylon

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Love the thread, a different twist again...

 

For me the Atari as are the other retro things I use, they have a common set of purposes..

 

1. I love games, I love them on any machine but the Atari was my real first love so it gets a special place in my heart. And lastly, its got some GREAT games on.....

 

2. Slightly different to some, I suffer from severe mental health issues like depression, I also suffer from physical illnesses that cause me immense pain. I'm not the only person on here with these problems and here's where the Atari especially, the C64 and Amiga help the most, memories and a spur to still enjoy gaming. I can relate to great times during those computers both in business and pleasure. They really allowed me to have a great mid row seat in the industry and other scenes at the time and I can take heart from those when the pain is making holding the pad too hard and try harder..

 

I count those times as the building blocks of my love of computers and games, the machines that followed allowed me to experience new and wonderful stuff but I'm grateful for the platform I started from that introduced it all, it really makes a difference these days, some may call it simple nostalgia but its so much more deep rooted for me, its a medicine if you will.

 

One medicine I do like taking!!

 

Paul...

Edited by Mclaneinc
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I am a Sinclair fan, as well. I ported PLATOTerm to the Spectrum (RS232 and Spectranet), and I have a ZX Omni on the way to use as my primary Speccy machine.

-Thom

I shall have to look into this ZX Omni you speak of... :-o :?

Edited by Gunstar

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https://retroradionics.co.uk/omni-128-hq-desktop.html

 

It also comes in a laptop variant, (adds a screen and internal batteries)

 

https://retroradionics.co.uk/omni-128-hq-laptop.html

 

Be prepared to wait, Djordje builds these to order, and he's being bitch-slapped by a constant flood of orders. :)

 

-Thom

I was hoping for a case with a real keyboard instead of the original chick-let rubber keys. I think I'll just get a later Spectrum model still, with keyboard and 128K...I didn't look at the laptop model to see it's keyboard, but I don't want a laptop model.

Edited by Gunstar

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Other than programming, I print everyday things like envelopes, checks, labels, and such. Long ago, I used to do this on a PC, but I had such poor control over the output that it was easier to do on my 1200XL.

 

Bob

 

attachicon.gifDSC01692.JPG

 

Does Bob want his address out there like that?

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After 25 years far from atari, I thought of coming back to playing some games and program again in Basic. Programming in basic had such an influence in who I became as a professional. But when I came back, it was with a strong force towards using real/original hardware for some reason. Also after so much time I now have way more knowledge about the chips, the design, the architecture the people and brands behind the HW and the company history. This sparked an increased admiration for the hardware, including the models I did not own when young. That’s how I ended up with a complete XL line and complete XE line collection. with several machines of each model but I always go back to the 800XL to revive simpler and easier times.

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@bob1200XL I wanted to buy one of the 1200's that you were selling many many moons ago, but I wasn't able to get the scratch together at the time. Now I finally have my 1200 to use as my daily driver, and it is a fantastic machine...mine came with a U1MB in it.

 

(I just need to replace the mylar, and do the UAV to it)

 

-Thom

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Does Bob want his address out there like that?

 

 

I don't mind giving out my address to anyone that wants it. I have no way to filter out the Bad Guys, if there are any. Otherwise, I would have to mask out some or most of the folks that I hang around here to meet. Throwing the Baby out with the Bathwater...

 

Bob

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He was looking out for you, as it provides your two addresses, everyday name, proper name, bank account and routing numbers. I worry about stuff like that as well. Of course the documents could be in an example or altered form and none of it is correct. but um it's not looking falsified. It needs that redacted and retouched look.

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Can people that use emulation only still be considered die-hard Atari users and enthusiasts? Not that my ego or personal self-worth is in question here..

Edited by Keatah

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Can people that use emulation only still be considered die-hard Atari users and enthusiasts? Not that my ego or personal self-worth is in question here..

Nope :-)

 

so long,

 

Hias

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Can people that use emulation only still be considered die-hard Atari users and enthusiasts? Not that my ego or personal self-worth is in question here..

 

g22sgru.gif

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I _have_ to use emulation. No real choice here, as I am developing software across many different platforms, and I can't keep the stuff on the bench.

 

Not to mention, the upkeep of just the few systems I do own, to get them up to scratch, the video improvement modifications, retrobrighting, keyboard mylar replacements, and the constant fear that this time will be the time that one of the many parts in the system gives up the ghost...

 

-Thom

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g22sgru.gif

I wish we could like something with a number of stars to show how much...***** 5 stars. I love the way that guy is laughing, I can't stop watching it and get this big silly grin off my face... :-D It fits so perfectly with my sentiments about the question.

 

I can see being a die-hard enthusiast who just can't help but use emulation while your real Atari is down or in storage during a move or something, because they can't stand being without it in some form, but it shouldn't be prolonged and getting the real thing back would have to be a priority. I've been there, except I didn't use emulation, I just worked toward and dreamed of the day my Atari was back in my hands working.

Edited by Gunstar

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I _have_ to use emulation. No real choice here, as I am developing software across many different platforms, and I can't keep the stuff on the bench.

 

Not to mention, the upkeep of just the few systems I do own, to get them up to scratch, the video improvement modifications, retrobrighting, keyboard mylar replacements, and the constant fear that this time will be the time that one of the many parts in the system gives up the ghost...

 

-Thom

This is understandable. But at least you have one or more real machines up and running, favorites, it's not emulation only.

 

Not that it's a bad thing to do emulation only, if you are a "fan" but not an "enthusiast." I just can't see anyone calling themselves die-hard enthusiasts of a computer they don't own for real. If you were die-hard, it means what it says and you FIND A WAY NO MATTER WHAT, or just give up the ghost entirely and move on with your life if you can't find a way.

Edited by Gunstar

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