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Best way of removing fine scratches and scuffs from cases

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Anyone know what the best way of making a case look like brand new is? Obviously you can retrobright it to get rid of yellowing and WD40 will polish up the case nicely but I'm look for a way of removing the really fine scratches that show the consoles age? I've heard that using a cream cleaner like cif/jif works as it has micro-particles so acts as a very light abrasive.

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I use Novus on lots of things, from instrument panels in the car to pinball playfield plastics and more:

 

https://www.amazon.com/s?k=Novus&ref=nb_sb_noss_2

 

How well will this work on those micro scratches on, for example, the original PS3 with the piano black finish. It's got so many micro scratches on it, it looks like complete crap where I am thinking about replacing it. I did try some car polish as it works epic for micro scratches in paint but, saw no real result.

 

Can this actually be recovered ?

 

Thanks to the OP for posting this, I have been thinking about the same thing. I have some my original game systems when I was a kid but, the little scratches has me wondering if I should replace it...

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I'd definitely try Novus #2 or #3 on a PS3, followed up with #1 and a microfiber cloth. Novus was made for projects like this!

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I'd definitely try Novus #2 or #3 on a PS3, followed up with #1 and a microfiber cloth. Novus was made for projects like this!

 

I'll give it a shot...I'll grab some this week. Amazon appears to be a reasonable price for the kit... I have a few systems that could use some love here... It would be really nice if there was a way to make them look almost new...

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I originally got a nice 1-2-3 kit of Novus through marco pinball a couple years back and it lasted, still does in 2 of the 3 bottles. I should re-order but I get lazy about it. One thing though I would not do it on transparent stuff, it may smooth it out but it'll dull a nice haze to it.

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Cool, maybe you could post some before and after pics!

 

I will, I might be doing a video as well for it. As I will be starting a YouTube channel and I can edit it later for some content....

Edited by TheCoolDave
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I originally got a nice 1-2-3 kit of Novus through marco pinball a couple years back and it lasted, still does in 2 of the 3 bottles. I should re-order but I get lazy about it. One thing though I would not do it on transparent stuff, it may smooth it out but it'll dull a nice haze to it.

Not supposed to dull or haze transparent plastics at all, which is why I use it to clean instrument panels. Can always tell when someone has taken a paper towel and glass cleaner to their panels - talk about dulling and scratching it all to hell! But maybe you had some other compound (like Millwax, yuck) left over on your rag or something? Or didn't follow up with the #1 solution? It's all in the type of rag you use to finish too.

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Yeah, would be great if you could post the results @TheCoolDave. Especially on a gloss finish like the fat PS3!

 

I was reading some reviews on plastic polish type products and a few people posted to say you can get the exact same thing for 80p by just using kitchen cream cleaner so I might give it a go. Think I'll look from some broken Mega Drives on eBay to test it out on.

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Not supposed to dull or haze transparent plastics at all, which is why I use it to clean instrument panels. Can always tell when someone has taken a paper towel and glass cleaner to their panels - talk about dulling and scratching it all to hell! But maybe you had some other compound (like Millwax, yuck) left over on your rag or something? Or didn't follow up with the #1 solution? It's all in the type of rag you use to finish too.

In general no, but I've used it on transparent cheap stuff like CD jewel cases or that plastic laminate on a DVD case and it fogs it up nicely. Clearer better plastics like that on a pinball machine it won't do it to. I tried both using a cotton cloth and the micro fiber cloth from marco when I got the kit as it came with it.

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In general no, but I've used it on transparent cheap stuff like CD jewel cases or that plastic laminate on a DVD case and it fogs it up nicely. Clearer better plastics like that on a pinball machine it won't do it to. I tried both using a cotton cloth and the micro fiber cloth from marco when I got the kit as it came with it.

 

Good to know. I might do some tests on some things I don't really care about before testing on the consoles for clear test...

 

Ordered the kit from Amazon today, so I should have it over the weekend, so I will try at some point next week...

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Hah, it's funny this topic came up.. I was about to create one similar. :)

 

I'm actually in the middle of a project to revamp some flash carts, which I'm trying to rehouse. I'm doing away with the plain, boring looking black shells and am swapping the PCBs into some clear/translucent Lexan cart shells that I finally obtained. I've done some reading and here's what I learned so far.

 

You need to know what type of plastic you're working with. For example, most cart shells are made from polycarbonate/Lexan, especially translucent ones, but solid color shells can be ABS too. Lexan is stronger and shinier by nature but it's harder to polish than ABS. Vapor polishing seems to be the way to go but it's practically impossible for a home type project, due to it being a dangerous, toxic process. Nobody in their right mind is going to send off some old cartridge shells or consoles to a company to have them do it either. Though flame polishing is another popular method, it's not the best method to use with Lexan because it's a very touchy process and it's extremely easy to screw it up by burning the plastic. Just 10-20 degrees too much, heat wise is all it takes to go from perfectly polished to toasted. So good 'ol elbow grease will have to do.

 

I too just picked up the Novus polishing system. If you used Novus #3 heavy scratch polish on anything translucent, it says on the back of the bottle Not to use it on polycarbonate.. Which might be the reason it hazed up. Novus #2 and #1 are supposedly safe on polycarbonate though. ABS you're good to go on the 1 through 3 polishes. You're supposed to start with #3, or #2, depending on the severity of the scratches, then finish it off with #1. Be sure to completely wipe off the polish and use a fresh cloth, etc before switching polishes. Washyyour parts with dish soap and water. Do not use isopropyl alcohol to clean those types of plastics and don't use any petroleum type products (like WD40) on those types of plastics either, as they'll both weaken the plastic and could cause crazing sooner or later, then you'll really be screwed.

 

I did a little polishing by hand today and it helped but I think I'm going to bust out the Dremel with a polishing cone and wheel on it tomorrow, using it at a low speed of course. The one clear intellivision cart shell has some pretty nasty scratches due to some mold flaws, so I might have to wet sand those scratches, starting with 600 grit, working my way on up to 3000g, then start with Novus #2, then finish with #1. We'll see how it goes. :P It sucks I couldn't just start off with #3 and I still might try it, but it'll be on a small area. However, I hate to take a chance on screwing these shells up since they were very hard to come by in the first place! Lol

 

Non-textured plastic is one thing but as someone else already mentioned, be really careful on any textured plastic.. Don't over-do it. Anyways, good luck with your plastic restorations! :)

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I wonder if Novus would work for headlight restoration. My 2006 Ford van has some pretty dulled headlights thanks to scratched lenses. I already have some, but didn't think of that until now.

Edited by derFunkenstein
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