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Tommy Tallarico - Fun Amico Conversations

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On 8/24/2020 at 1:18 PM, A Concerned said:

@Tommy Tallarico

 

 

I have two questions about Amico controller use that, depending on the answer, may result in criticisms. I imagine that these issues came up in R&D or in whatever focus group testing Intellivision has been performed.

 

1.     Will any Amico game require the player to quickly look back and forth between the television and controller screens? By ‘quickly,’ I mean more often than once or twice a minute. If ‘yes,’ will this requirement be common in games where there is a good deal of motion on the television screen, controller screen, or both? If ‘yes,’ how will the Amico mitigate multiple-screen eyestrain issues (see https://time.com/4171966/digital-device-eye-strain-screens/). This is something I worry about with child and elderly eyesight especially, and, given that this console is designed to be safe and family-friendly, I would like to know how it will be addressed.

 

2.     Will any Amico game require the player to quickly press the touch screen? By ‘quickly,’ I mean in the range of every couple of seconds. If ‘yes,’ how will the Amico mitigate stress or strain injuries to the player? Without the travel of a button (which is not perfect to begin with), I worry that quick presses of the touch screen could be bad for fingers, thumbs, wrists, etc. (see https://www.technologyreview.com/2012/01/17/188347/can-touch-screens-hurt-you/).

 

While these issues are not unique to the Amico, the console’s focus on being a safe, family-friendly machine means that they apply to the Amico. Certainly, the references that I include are not the final say on these issues, but they do make me reticent to get a console like this for my nieces. 

 

@Tommy Tallarico

 

Sorry to be pushy, but I have seen you answer a few questions and address many comments, but I have not seen an answer to my two questions. Perhaps they have been addressed and I missed it?

 

Thank to you @mr_me for a candid, unofficial take on my questions, and for expressing some shared concerns with the sentiments behind my questions.

 

However, I believe that my questions warrant an official response, unless one has been given elsewhere. 

 

Speaking anecdotally, when I talk to the parents of young children, their number one concern with entertainment technology is the technology itself. Certainly, they care about content (for instance, games being family-friendly) to some degree, but they absolutely refuse to purchase technology that they believe will cause eye and finger issues for children. The two concerns they present are too much screen time (an issue compounded by multiple screens) and touch screen interaction (that involves quick, repeated presses). I should note that, for at least one family member with kids, these are families with no video game console. 

 

Presuming that these concerns are not completely idiosyncratic, I imagine that they must have come up during R&D testing and focus group testing. Yet, to my knowledge, nothing about the mechanics of game creation and console development seem to address them, except perhaps for the games being intended for relatively brief interaction (where, to my knowledge, a uniform sense of ‘brief’ has yet to be established). 

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35 minutes ago, A Concerned said:

 

@Tommy Tallarico

 

Sorry to be pushy, but I have seen you answer a few questions and address many comments, but I have not seen an answer to my two questions. Perhaps they have been addressed and I missed it?

 

Thank to you @mr_me for a candid, unofficial take on my questions, and for expressing some shared concerns with the sentiments behind my questions.

 

However, I believe that my questions warrant an official response, unless one has been given elsewhere. 

 

Speaking anecdotally, when I talk to the parents of young children, their number one concern with entertainment technology is the technology itself. Certainly, they care about content (for instance, games being family-friendly) to some degree, but they absolutely refuse to purchase technology that they believe will cause eye and finger issues for children. The two concerns they present are too much screen time (an issue compounded by multiple screens) and touch screen interaction (that involves quick, repeated presses). I should note that, for at least one family member with kids, these are families with no video game console. 

 

Presuming that these concerns are not completely idiosyncratic, I imagine that they must have come up during R&D testing and focus group testing. Yet, to my knowledge, nothing about the mechanics of game creation and console development seem to address them, except perhaps for the games being intended for relatively brief interaction (where, to my knowledge, a uniform sense of ‘brief’ has yet to be established). 

If you read the articles that you reference, both give you suggestions on how to mitigate the issues you are concerned with.

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17 hours ago, Tommy Tallarico said:

 

Was that any good?  I was a little disappointed with the trailer.  Cool to see them back together but the trailer didn't sell me on it.

 

Thoughts??

 

 

It was okay...started slow but had a few decent laughs as it went along.  Not nearly as good as "Excellent Adventure" and not nearly as bad as "Bogus Journey".  If 5 is "most triumphant" and 1 is "heinous" I'd give it a 3 star "righteous" mainly for nostalgia.

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@NTV

 

If the creators of the Amico have adopted a policy that does not take an active stance on limiting the developers' use of the screen in terms of tapping or screen images (these concerns are fleshed out in more detail in my original post), I will take that the answer to my questions is something like “we will present warnings when the system is turned on and encourage gameplay sessions to be short, but we leave the rest in the hands of the consumer.” If this is the answer, then, yes, it will be prudent to follow the suggestions reported in these articles. 

 

However, it is my understanding that the creators of the Amico have taken an active stance on limiting the presence of certain content on the system as a means of protecting consumers from this content. Due to this fact, I think it is valid to ask whether they have taken parallel active stances on the use of the technology itself by developers as a means of protecting consumers from the health side effects that may occur as a result of its use.

 

I appreciate that not everyone has these concerns or considers these concerns to rest on the creator of the technology. Nonetheless, I await an official response to my original questions.

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On 8/24/2020 at 1:18 PM, A Concerned said:

@Tommy Tallarico

 

 

I have two questions about Amico controller use that, depending on the answer, may result in criticisms. I imagine that these issues came up in R&D or in whatever focus group testing Intellivision has been performed.

 

1.     Will any Amico game require the player to quickly look back and forth between the television and controller screens? By ‘quickly,’ I mean more often than once or twice a minute. If ‘yes,’ will this requirement be common in games where there is a good deal of motion on the television screen, controller screen, or both? If ‘yes,’ how will the Amico mitigate multiple-screen eyestrain issues (see https://time.com/4171966/digital-device-eye-strain-screens/). This is something I worry about with child and elderly eyesight especially, and, given that this console is designed to be safe and family-friendly, I would like to know how it will be addressed.

 

2.     Will any Amico game require the player to quickly press the touch screen? By ‘quickly,’ I mean in the range of every couple of seconds. If ‘yes,’ how will the Amico mitigate stress or strain injuries to the player? Without the travel of a button (which is not perfect to begin with), I worry that quick presses of the touch screen could be bad for fingers, thumbs, wrists, etc. (see https://www.technologyreview.com/2012/01/17/188347/can-touch-screens-hurt-you/).

 

While these issues are not unique to the Amico, the console’s focus on being a safe, family-friendly machine means that they apply to the Amico. Certainly, the references that I include are not the final say on these issues, but they do make me reticent to get a console like this for my nieces. 

If you read this article carefully you will find nothing is said about switching views between displays. Looking at the actual information presented by the The Vision Council quoted in this article:

 

“What we’re finding is that Millennials especially are very comfortable working on multiple screens and multiple devices,” says Justin Bazan, an optometrist and medical adviser to The Vision Council. If you use your smartphone as an alarm clock, for example, “you have a digital device the second your eyes are open”—far before you even flip open a laptop screen.

(refers to total screen time, not switching)

and

Several factors contribute to digital eye strain, including how close you are to your screen. People typically hold small devices 8-12 inches away from their faces, a closeness that decreases blinking rates, the report says. “Blinking is crucial to keeping the ocular surface well protected from environmental assaults and our eyes from drying out,” Bazan says. “They’ll become dry and irritated, and vision will become blurry as well.” That’s where the urge to rub your eyes at the end of a long workday comes from.

(extended, close screen play can limit blinking and cause eye irritation - best to mostly play on a larger TV for example and not a phone, tablet or portable Switch)

 

That is it - nothing about switching between display as being inherently bad. By "multiple screens" they simply mean excessive use of multiple devices with screens (PC, laptop, phone, e-reader, etc) which in total mean a screen is presented to your eyes much more than you may realize.

 

Fortunately when playing Amico multiplayer games you often will be looking at the other players and interacting with others in the room, providing non-screen time for your eyes. In addition although you may occasionally look at the controller screens, it isn't the main way you play the game (unlike a phone or tablet) so you won't be in a prolonged 8 to 12 inches way position which causes the most issues.

 

As far as excessive touch screen presses, fortunately the Amico controller is designed with 4 buttons and the disc for physical controls (plus motion controls for broader inputs). The reason these were put on the device over a simple touch screen (that would have been a lot cheaper) is not only to prevent repetitive motion injuries through tapping on a hard surface forcefully & repeatably but to provide the tactile feedback that makes gaming dramatically more pleasurable than on a phone. Although buttons can be represented on the Amico screen, you will find the most repetitive input task Tommy has mentioned with the screen is not button pressing but sliding along the surface like a trackpad. When on screen buttons would be used in, say Utopia (a strategy game) or Spades (a card game), you would be making rather considered and few choices (i.e. few and slow). This is compatible to selecting apps or scrolling on your cell phone. For games which might use screen buttons more frequently (perhaps like the original Intellvision games being emulated) Intelivision has already mentioned there will be a rubberized overlay which will help orient the fingers and provide a pad for actual finger presses too. So even then, a big step up over the traditional glass cell phone screen for finger ergonomics.

 

However this article is a good warning for people who do excessive phone gaming for quick reflex shooters - buy a control pad or play on a different device. Buttons play better and are better for you.

 

From the research I have read it is a good idea to limit children's screen time. Fortunately Amico games are designed mostly for 'pick up and play' which allows quick sessions of gaming without requiring prolonged game play to progress. This is perfect to limited a child's exposure to gaming screen time. Also placing the game playing device on a TV (which is often centrally located) will help moms & dads keep an eye on their children's usage rather than finding them curled up with a phone or tablet in their room after many, many hours.

 

In multiple interviews Tommy has mentioned that they are the only video game console company that actually recommends limiting child play time and actually go outside and playing between sessions. This is a very refreshing stance in an industry that has turned to gambling mechanics and predatory loot box/pay to win sales directed towards anyone playing, including children. Designed for shorter game play sessions, social interaction with group game play, centralized play for easier parental monitoring, no loot boxes, ads or in app purchases and a 100% family friendly game play stance - the Amico is by far the best system for young children.

 

ControllerIsometric-700x507.jpg

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46 minutes ago, GrudgeQ said:

 

 

In multiple interviews Tommy has mentioned that they are the only video game console company that actually recommends limiting child play time and actually go outside and playing between sessions. This is a very refreshing stance in an industry that has turned to gambling mechanics and predatory loot box/pay to win sales directed towards anyone playing, including children. Designed for shorter game play sessions, social interaction with group game play, centralized play for easier parental monitoring, no loot boxes, ads or in app purchases and a 100% family friendly game play stance - the Amico is by far the best system for young children.

 

ControllerIsometric-700x507.jpg

https://www.nintendo.com/switch/parental-controls/

 

Says switch has an app where you can limit kids play time, an alarm will go off. 

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@GrudgeQ

 

Oh dear. I hadn’t thought of the possibility that a developer for a game on this console would expect the player to keep both the television and the controller screen in one’s field of vision *at the same time*. That would be the worst case scenario. I imagined circumstances where the player would be expected to saccade between the television and controller screen quickly, akin to cases where one might be checking two monitors quickly or copying text from a tablet to a computer. Something like this sort of issue is represented in this video: 

 

 

It is good to hear that no games are being designed that require the player to have the screen anywhere close to their eyes, unless I am misunderstanding your claims. 

 

It is also good to hear that the controllers will come packed with some sort of mediator pad for the screen. If any games are designed around quick presses to the screen, this mediator pad will prove useful. I hadn’t heard this, but, of course, this is the reason why I posed my questions here. 

 

It sounds like a good idea to keep all pressing on the dedicated buttons on the side of the controller or the wheel button on the controller. Has Intellivision required this of all developers (except perhaps in cases where it is expected that the players use the included mediator pad)?

 

As I heard before, I would like to know more about how the console regulates playtime. Will it have some sort of lock-down mode where the game stops after about 15-30 minutes? 

 

As I mentioned in my second post here on the forum, that the Amico is better than other consoles doesn’t affect my concerns about it. I have in mind a set of families who own no console and generally prohibit their children’s use of tablets and phones. A better comparison would be this console and something like Candyland. 

 

Anyways, thank you for your response. I will await an official response to confirm some of the points you made in your post. 

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9 minutes ago, Juice said:

https://www.nintendo.com/switch/parental-controls/

 

Says switch has an app where you can limit kids play time, an alarm will go off. 

Yes and Nintendo is also the only company to allows games that have sexual content under the rating of e for everyone. So pretty much makes the parental blocks  useless.  So sorry once a company makes repeated missteps like this its to compare it to the Amico . Also your only mentioning 1 tiny thing in a broad picture that makes the Nintendo not remotely safe when compared to the Amico.  Heres a simple illustration. 

2 glasses of water filtered and both safe to drink.  Now someone slips a drop of arsenic to 1 of the glasses of water because they weren't watching. Both look clean seem clean would you trust the one with poise in it to your children to drink just because the company makes it look safe? Says its safe? 

Or would you take the one that you know  is clean? 

Point is Nintendo has already proved they cant filter on multiple situations.  

Losing confidence.  

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21 minutes ago, Relicgamer said:

Yes and Nintendo is also the only company to allows games that have sexual content under the rating of e for everyone. So pretty much makes the parental blocks  useless.  So sorry once a company makes repeated missteps like this its to compare it to the Amico . Also your only mentioning 1 tiny thing in a broad picture that makes the Nintendo not remotely safe when compared to the Amico.  Heres a simple illustration. 

2 glasses of water filtered and both safe to drink.  Now someone slips a drop of arsenic to 1 of the glasses of water because they weren't watching. Both look clean seem clean would you trust the one with poise in it to your children to drink just because the company makes it look safe? Says its safe? 

Or would you take the one that you know  is clean? 

Point is Nintendo has already proved they cant filter on multiple situations.  

Losing confidence.  

I was just talking about the limit of play time feature. Grudge said Amico will be the only console to promote that which is simply not true

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11 minutes ago, A Concerned said:

@GrudgeQ

 

Oh dear. I hadn’t thought of the possibility that a developer for a game on this console would expect the player to keep both the television and the controller screen in one’s field of vision *at the same time*. That would be the worst case scenario. I imagined circumstances where the player would be expected to saccade between the television and controller screen quickly, akin to cases where one might be checking two monitors quickly or copying text from a tablet to a computer. Something like this sort of issue is represented in this video: 

 

 

It is good to hear that no games are being designed that require the player to have the screen anywhere close to their eyes, unless I am misunderstanding your claims. 

 

It is also good to hear that the controllers will come packed with some sort of mediator pad for the screen. If any games are designed around quick presses to the screen, this mediator pad will prove useful. I hadn’t heard this, but, of course, this is the reason why I posed my questions here. 

 

It sounds like a good idea to keep all pressing on the dedicated buttons on the side of the controller or the wheel button on the controller. Has Intellivision required this of all developers (except perhaps in cases where it is expected that the players use the included mediator pad)?

 

As I heard before, I would like to know more about how the console regulates playtime. Will it have some sort of lock-down mode where the game stops after about 15-30 minutes? 

 

As I mentioned in my second post here on the forum, that the Amico is better than other consoles doesn’t affect my concerns about it. I have in mind a set of families who own no console and generally prohibit their children’s use of tablets and phones. A better comparison would be this console and something like Candyland. 

 

Anyways, thank you for your response. I will await an official response to confirm some of the points you made in your post. 

Definitely a concern.  I mean people that play scrabble have serious issues looking between their piece's and the piece's on the board. And its especially concerning when playing cards like poker or uno. The headaches generated by having to focus on your hand of cards and the cards placed on the table. 

 

Puzzles this has to be looked into as well.

There is soo many tiny pieces and you have to look up at the boxes image to get perspective and back at the pieces repeatedly.  The constant focusing back and forth is something that should be brought up as well. 

Then theres restless thumb syndrome RTS from playing games like fortnite, not kidding young kids are developing arthritis at an early age from having to switch from building then back to attacking. Clicking the analog stick down repeatedly has lasting effects as well. 

What really needs to be done to all gaming platforms from pc, consoles and mobile puzzles card games and board games is set time limits.

As regards to mobile this is where things get dicey. 

Because if there is a mandate to set limits how do you implement it?

Do you shut down all controls? 

Now this is troublesome because what happens if your child has an emergency and cant call because there controls have been locked out?

Your girlfriend maxed her time playing candy crush and cant call 911 due to an intruder lurking around the house. How do you get all developers to work around this? It really boggles the mind.  

And what about the problems centered around board games,  card games.  How do you put time limits on those games?

Maybe they could implement a law to rid the world of all none electronic board games and make everyone play them on cellphones or other electronic devices with these set time limits.  

Its alot to take in I know but I really do think you are on to something and it really needs to be discussed more. 

 

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56 minutes ago, A Concerned said:

@GrudgeQ

 

Oh dear. I hadn’t thought of the possibility that a developer for a game on this console would expect the player to keep both the television and the controller screen in one’s field of vision *at the same time*. That would be the worst case scenario. I imagined circumstances where the player would be expected to saccade between the television and controller screen quickly, akin to cases where one might be checking two monitors quickly or copying text from a tablet to a computer. Something like this sort of issue is represented in this video: 

 

 

It is good to hear that no games are being designed that require the player to have the screen anywhere close to their eyes, unless I am misunderstanding your claims. 

 

It is also good to hear that the controllers will come packed with some sort of mediator pad for the screen. If any games are designed around quick presses to the screen, this mediator pad will prove useful. I hadn’t heard this, but, of course, this is the reason why I posed my questions here. 

 

It sounds like a good idea to keep all pressing on the dedicated buttons on the side of the controller or the wheel button on the controller. Has Intellivision required this of all developers (except perhaps in cases where it is expected that the players use the included mediator pad)?

 

As I heard before, I would like to know more about how the console regulates playtime. Will it have some sort of lock-down mode where the game stops after about 15-30 minutes? 

 

As I mentioned in my second post here on the forum, that the Amico is better than other consoles doesn’t affect my concerns about it. I have in mind a set of families who own no console and generally prohibit their children’s use of tablets and phones. A better comparison would be this console and something like Candyland. 

 

Anyways, thank you for your response. I will await an official response to confirm some of the points you made in your post. 

 

1) Frankly I have no idea what your first point is - it would impossible to keep focus on two screens at once while playing a game. I am not sure why anyone would be concerned about a developer making a game impossible to play. Also are you really going to hold a game controller in your line of site continually in order to watch two screens? Your hands getting tired would eliminate any issues with this terrible game in just a few minutes.

 

2) That video re-inforces what I said and what that Times article said. Use of continual multiple screens by simply going from one screen to another adds to your overall screen time. Again no where does it say the switching (your point in your first post) is bad - it is simply more screen time for your eyes. You simply misinterpreted the meaning of that article.

 

3) All Amico games are designed in conjunction with Intellivision Entertainment and so you don't simply have developers making arbitrary interface design decisions. Good game design means you don't excessively use the worst tactile button input feedback on a device when you have tactile (i.e. real buttons) available. You might offer it as an option for players which find it more comfortable or intuitive but in conjunction with better options. The screen's advantage as a button pressing device is when you need low quantity but highly variable input such as choosing a card, picking a dice to roll or selecting the color of your player.

 

4) I never said you would never have a screen closer, obviously the screens on the controllers would be held closer (although most people would not hold a controller very close to their eyes). My point is they are used far less frequently (or not at all, depending on the game) to show visual information. If you absolutely refuse to have to any any up close screen time for a child, then make sure to never show them anything on your smart phone either - no pictures from Facebook, no cute cat videos, nothing. And of course make sure you keep phones out of their hands at all cost - the first thing they will want to do is look at the screen. You are obviously very concerned about such things so that would be my recommendation.

 

5) I would love to see reminders/limits within the console about play time and Tommy has hinted at these, hopefully more will be revealed near launch. Of course the Amico is much more naturally conducive to being able to monitor play over hand held devices so the need is less, as I pointed out earlier.

 

6) Some would argue that children should be exposed to no (or very limited) technology, however those are a very small minority of the population. I don't think you should introduce an Amico into any family that is trying to raise their children tech free, so if that is your ultimate question, then no - get them Candyland. My response was for the vast majority of people who are trying to find a balance between technology time and other sorts of play and learning.

 

7) Finally thanks for pointing out via your first article that devices like the Switch when used in hand held mode can be detrimental to ocular health, I will make sure to pass that along to concerned parents I know.

 

 

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31 minutes ago, GrudgeQ said:

 

1) Frankly I have no idea what your first point is - it would impossible to keep focus on two screens at once while playing a game. I am not sure why anyone would be concerned about a developer making a game impossible to play. Also are you really going to hold a game controller in your line of site continually in order to watch two screens? Your hands getting tired would eliminate any issues with this terrible game in just a few minutes.

This game sounds like it sucks. I hate this game. I mean, I'm probably going to buy this game, but I do so very reluctantly. 

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@GrudgeQ and @Relicgamer

 

I am sorry if I offended either of you. If you think my questions are frivolous, I won’t ask them to the group again. This will be my last post to the forum page unless @Tommy Tallarico is willing to engage with my concerns. 

 

I do think multiple screen induced eye issues are a genuine concern for this console. They are concerns that can be ameliorated by a number of engineering and software-based solutions, which is why I would like to hear about those solutions. 

 

Sorry for my vagueness with the use of the word ‘switch’ in the context of eyes. I used the term ‘saccade’ to be more precise. I do think there are potential worries with multiple screens and brightness/contrast issues as well. @mr_me mentioned a similar issue with the WiiU that had the controller with a screen on it.

 

I saw a game called safe cracker scrolling through the Intellivision game videos after @GrudgeQ comments, which at least appears to have the player hold the controller to the tv and exploit the screens concurrently. Perhaps this is merely a representation of a different action by the player. 

 

I don’t have in mind parents who raise kids in a tech free environment. I have in mind parents who are genuinely concerned with the impact technologies have on physical issues in children. These parents want to know ahead of time how their children will interact with the technology. A handful of the young parents in my family and friends circle express these worries to me. I merely would like to know this sort of information in relation to the questions I initially asked. If they are poorly phrased from your perspective, I will clarify them to Tommy as best as I can. 

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1 hour ago, Juice said:

I was just talking about the limit of play time feature. Grudge said Amico will be the only console to promote that which is simply not true

"recommend" was the word used. Having it available and recommending it are two separate things. Show me where Nintendo recommends limiting playtime and I'll believe you. 🙂

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I think the wii u has a game where you put both displays in your field of view.

 

Although the amico is not a handheld device, studies have shown that changes in blink rates and other ocular symptoms with reading on an electronic tablet is similar to a paper book.  Amico games are played on a TV.  There will be occasional use of the controller display depending on the game e.g. looking at your hand playing a card game.

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26 minutes ago, A Concerned said:

@GrudgeQ and @Relicgamer

 

I am sorry if I offended either of you. If you think my questions are frivolous, I won’t ask them to the group again. This will be my last post to the forum page unless @Tommy Tallarico is willing to engage with my concerns. 

 

I do think multiple screen induced eye issues are a genuine concern for this console. They are concerns that can be ameliorated by a number of engineering and software-based solutions, which is why I would like to hear about those solutions. 

 

Sorry for my vagueness with the use of the word ‘switch’ in the context of eyes. I used the term ‘saccade’ to be more precise. I do think there are potential worries with multiple screens and brightness/contrast issues as well. @mr_me mentioned a similar issue with the WiiU that had the controller with a screen on it.

 

I saw a game called safe cracker scrolling through the Intellivision game videos after @GrudgeQ comments, which at least appears to have the player hold the controller to the tv and exploit the screens concurrently. Perhaps this is merely a representation of a different action by the player. 

 

I don’t have in mind parents who raise kids in a tech free environment. I have in mind parents who are genuinely concerned with the impact technologies have on physical issues in children. These parents want to know ahead of time how their children will interact with the technology. A handful of the young parents in my family and friends circle express these worries to me. I merely would like to know this sort of information in relation to the questions I initially asked. If they are poorly phrased from your perspective, I will clarify them to Tommy as best as I can. 

No I think they are valid questions. And look forward to Tommy answering your concerns. Ive asked friends that have friends with children with concerns as well in the past on related or unrelated topics and have started whole discussions centered around it and the only way to get a response to your sincere concerns is to come to forums and ask.

We all are just concerned consumers right? 

                                                                #Sq

Edited by Relicgamer
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56 minutes ago, A Concerned said:

@GrudgeQ and @Relicgamer

 

I am sorry if I offended either of you. If you think my questions are frivolous, I won’t ask them to the group again. This will be my last post to the forum page unless @Tommy Tallarico is willing to engage with my concerns. 

 

I do think multiple screen induced eye issues are a genuine concern for this console. They are concerns that can be ameliorated by a number of engineering and software-based solutions, which is why I would like to hear about those solutions. 

 

Sorry for my vagueness with the use of the word ‘switch’ in the context of eyes. I used the term ‘saccade’ to be more precise. I do think there are potential worries with multiple screens and brightness/contrast issues as well. @mr_me mentioned a similar issue with the WiiU that had the controller with a screen on it.

 

I saw a game called safe cracker scrolling through the Intellivision game videos after @GrudgeQ comments, which at least appears to have the player hold the controller to the tv and exploit the screens concurrently. Perhaps this is merely a representation of a different action by the player. 

 

I don’t have in mind parents who raise kids in a tech free environment. I have in mind parents who are genuinely concerned with the impact technologies have on physical issues in children. These parents want to know ahead of time how their children will interact with the technology. A handful of the young parents in my family and friends circle express these worries to me. I merely would like to know this sort of information in relation to the questions I initially asked. If they are poorly phrased from your perspective, I will clarify them to Tommy as best as I can. 

1) No not at all, was just pointing out your mistake on the Times article and that video. I try not to judge about how concerned people are about technology and children. If you are very concerned about close screen time, then by all means make sure you take measures, even extreme measures to limit that. I fully support you in that decision if you think it is important for your child/relative.

 

2) Screen time is a genuine concern, especially when it comes to children and I brought up lots of points (like shortened game play, easier monitoring, etc) which help but obviously do not eliminate this issue.  I also support the idea that it would be a good feature for the Amico to have some sort of alert or limit on it's game play. Again, nothing in anything you have shown in articles or video says that multiple screens is an issue. However having brightness & color balance between screens is recommended in a multi monitor setup - because both screens are visible continually. However having both screen in the same line of site will not be the case with the Amico controller screen and your TV except in rare circumstances (see #3).

 

3) For a brief moment in Safe Cracker (or some other game) that might be true HOWEVER again, the issue of holding a controller up for very long means this is a brief interaction. This certainly isn't continual game play and note that in order to show the controller working with the game it is necessary to film both of them together (i.e in the same line of site, even if that wouldn't be the normal usage method). I do NOT think players will typically be holding up the controller screen in the same line of site in normal play. Perhaps for some tiny game play elements but again, nobody will hold their controller up to eye level for long just due to fatigue. Also many games simply don't use the screen for game related visuals at all.

 

4) Again I support you concerns. What I question is if you have actually pointed out any issues which are not very limited edge cases or mis-interpretations. Occasional close up screen use in some games, possible screen brightness issues between two disparate screens on two different site lines, etc. is unacceptable if you take a zero tolerance stance - but most people do not take that stance. If you do take that stance again never let the child have a cell phone or tablet because if they look at it and then the TV I can guarantee the color balance & brightness won't be the same and of course they are looking at that mobile screen close up (full of complex eye straining information and not simply large representations of things like cards or which pony to pick). Instead I think most parents (including myself) look for ways to make sure our children have reasonably limited screen time overall, even more limited screen time for up close screens (i.e. not reliance on phones & tables), content which we know is safe and electronic content which encourages social interaction rather than inhibits it. That is not only good for social development but also supplies times for your eyes to rest on a non screen item, like an actual human.

 

5) Tommy has said he will much more technical videos about the controllers and console coming soon and I am sure he will wade in here on this conversation when he gets the chance, so we should all learn more then.

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1 hour ago, A Concerned said:

 

I saw a game called safe cracker scrolling through the Intellivision game videos after @GrudgeQ comments, which at least appears to have the player hold the controller to the tv and exploit the screens concurrently. Perhaps this is merely a representation of a different action by the player. 

Screenshot_20200907-000545_Kiwi_Browser.thumb.png.7f6f01f6b137295a5737d0ab97025603.png

 

Is this what you're talking about.  That's the TV display.  I don't see anything to suggest that you have to look at both the controller and the TV at the same time.  There will definitely be activities in this game involving the controller, some of which involve listening to the controller speaker and not even looking at any display.

 

Switching focus between the TV and the controller would actually contribute to alleviating some of the concerns.  And as has been mentioned by others, the second screen in amico games does not increase the screen time of any play session.  The concern seems to be greater with close proximity to the display.  Amico games are primarily played on a TV at distance. 

 

1 hour ago, A Concerned said:

Sorry for my vagueness with the use of the word ‘switch’ in the context of eyes. I used the term ‘saccade’ to be more precise. I do think there are potential worries with multiple screens and brightness/contrast issues as well.

I haven't seen any amico game that suggests saccading between controller and TV either.   Amico games are primarily played on a TV, where brightness and contrast can be adjusted.  If amico controllers can be adjusted does it alleviate your concern.

Edited by mr_me
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Hey @cmart604 and @Tommy Tallarico after this whole Covid thing dies down a bit is there any possibility we could get you two together to do talk Intellivision history and maybe do some show & tell of your collections?

 

Not that in trying to bribe you but I happen to be flush with Tim Horton and Vegan Essentials gift cards if it will help make it happen ;)

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1 hour ago, GrudgeQ said:

Hey @cmart604 and @Tommy Tallarico after this whole Covid thing dies down a bit is there any possibility we could get you two together to do talk Intellivision history and maybe do some show & tell of your collections?

 

Not that in trying to bribe you but I happen to be flush with Tim Horton and Vegan Essentials gift cards if it will help make it happen ;)

Only if it's Canadian Tim Horton's....

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3 hours ago, GrudgeQ said:

Hey @cmart604 and @Tommy Tallarico after this whole Covid thing dies down a bit is there any possibility we could get you two together to do talk Intellivision history and maybe do some show & tell of your collections?

 

Not that in trying to bribe you but I happen to be flush with Tim Horton and Vegan Essentials gift cards if it will help make it happen ;)

I'm definitely looking forward to the day when Tommy and I can meet up, whether it's me going down to visit @Tommy Tallarico and @nurmix in LA, or them coming up here to Vancouver and hopefully meeting up with @OEB_Pete and Victor. I'm more than happy to have a collection discussion even without being bribed with Timmy's, followed by some Amico "testing". 😂

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On 9/6/2020 at 8:54 AM, nightmonkeyii said:

This looks awesome!

 

 

playing 4 players would cost a fortune. 4 switches and 4 karts. But what a awesome thing

 

When I saw this, the first thing I thought was that this looks EXPENSIVE! First you have to buy a Switch, $300. Then you have to buy the set, ~$125. Then if you want to play two player, it's another ~$125. That's ~$250 just to play one game with two players. Then you have to have all this space in your house to lay out the track. I admit that it does look cool, but from a practical standpoint, I just don't get it. It's like a really expensive proof of concept that I don't really think would be much more fun than just playing the original game on your TV.

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21 hours ago, Intellivision Master said:

Tommy,

 

Any plans to have Thunder Blade on Amico?  Maybe it could be turned into a top down or side scrolling game.  Also, what about something like Desert Strike?

 

 

Not at this time, but I was a huge fan of the Desert Strike series so I'm not opposed to something like that.  I think it would be cool.  Top down helicopter adventure.

 

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