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Muddyfunster

800XE vertical lines composite

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I think to sum this up, if replacing that capacitor makes things better as far as noise in the video is concerned, then that means the original had gone bad. Reason for the original cap failing can be chalked up to age, inactivity, or damage caused by the stress of physical manipulation (likely bent too far side to side). When replacing said capacitor, the pitch (lead spacing) should match the board, capacitance should match the original (10 uf), and the voltage just needs to be a safe margin above 5v which 16v definitely is. Things such as the reforming voltage, although it might play a role in the ultimate life, probably won't matter since any new capacitor close to the original spec will outlast any of us unless you are still in your teen years (that counts me out).

 

Bottom line as has been already pointed out, a higher voltage rating than the original part is not required, nor will it work any better because of it. However due to better efficiencies in newer designs you might find that a newer 16v part is both smaller in size and pitch as compared to the original capacitor. Thus a higher voltage newer version might match the old one's pitch and be a better fit which will prevent damage when inserting it into the board. And lastly as Gunstar pointed out, if the pitch is too small don't force it into the board, but instead reform the leads to fit properly as he described.

 

And lastly let's not kill the messenger who has possibly pointed out a valid fix for the vertical lines issue that has been such a long standing problem on the A8. He might have simply used the higher rated 25v part because it fit better in the original hole, although his statements about safety related to this are really a non-issue.

 

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I'll add one more thing to the issue of mismatched lead spacing, known as pitch. Measure the hole spacing in the motherboard with calipers, and try to match this spec when ordering the new component. Mouser and Digi-Key usually have this listed on the order page under specs, and other vendors such as Jameco provide the datasheet where the information is provided. Basically do your research before ordering.

 

Don't ever force the wrong pitched part into a board such as the previously posted image suggests with the angled leads. If the lead spacing isn't a match, then either reform the leads carefully by making a series of bends in the leads with needle nose pliers, or just get the correctly pitched part in the first place (better).

 

 

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Posted (edited)
36 minutes ago, mytek said:

Basically do your research before ordering.

Outside America, China or any other manufacturing country, you have to get used to what is available in sites with free shipping options, like AliExpress. If there isn't a huge demand in a place, there isn't a huge variety of products.

 

At Mouser:

Image1.png.2fe15ef0873f5592b0f3e4ebf73c367b.png   Image2.png.389e7efed60bcdedafbc194376bdef90.png

 

 

 

Edited by tane
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13 hours ago, Gunstar said:

I see, I just naturally bend the legs at about a half-centimeter from the bottom of the cap, if they are not at the same pitch, to match the pitch and make them parallel, before I ever try and insert them. Of course I have never tried to insert a cap so it is flush with the mobo, I always leave at least a half-centimeter between the bottom of the cap and the mobo, if there isn't enough head-room, I carefully bend the cap over, but that has rarely happened, and in fact, when I am working on a circuit board, I make sure all caps and anything else on legs are all standing as vertically straight as possible, especially if they are close to other components, so nothing is touching. More to make it all look nice and neat than anything else, but I like to make sure every component has as much breathing room as possible.

and in fact, during some of my work, stand offs, spacers etc. were required between caps, transistors and other such components and the PCB. Vibration, temperature extremes, and other forces acting on the components would lead to failure otherwise.

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Posted (edited)

 

This capacitor is going on the Power board for my 1084S-P. All the new capacitors are about half the size of the originals.

 

IMG_20190704_233428.jpg

 

Old and new (installed) 

200V 220uf capacitors.

 

IMG_20190705_000151.jpg

Edited by Gunstar
improved image
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I would recommend using an MLCC SMD capacitors instead all electrolytic except 470uF/16 next to the power switch. 10uF or 22uF 10V 1206 are easily available and cheap.

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