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So my father-in-law had a bunch of IC laying about the place food number of them are ferrous. I found a few with the TI logo. Is anyone interested in some pix?

 

Sent from my SM-G955U using Tapatalk

 

 

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Here's a model/part number list for the TI parts only.

SN7489N

SN754410NE

SN74LS125AN

SN74151AN

SN74LS27N

SN74LS00N x4 [Logic Gates Quad 2-In Pos NAND]

SN74HC595N x2

SN7447N

SN74LS153N

SN74121N

 

If someone wants some of these for their tinkerin', lemme know. I'll ship 'em out.

 

Sent from my SM-G955U using Tapatalk

 

 

 

 

 

 

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6 minutes ago, Mehridian Sanders said:

Here's a model/part number list for the TI parts only.

SN7489N

SN754410NE

SN74LS125AN

SN74151AN

SN74LS27N

SN74LS00N x4

SN74HC595N x2

SN7447N

SN74LS153N

SN74121N

 

The LS parts are still popular, many projects would call for a '00, '27, or '125. Plain 74xx, not.

The 595 is super popular, but, the HC series input are not compatible with 74 outputs.

 

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Fun with old parts!

 

The 7400 are old NAND gates. The 7474 are old flip flops. They are original TTL and power hungry. In our 1980s-ish era, 74LS predominates. (low power, Schottky diode protected.)


The 74ALS parts are terrific.

 

The MC6821 is an interface controller for use with a 6800 CPU. Kind of like a 9901 for that series. I dunno if there might be one in a Coco3 for its 6809.


There are a lot of RCA 4000 series chips. Those are the CMOS logic chip series. TI also sold 4000 series. The MC14000 are the Motorola versions of this series.

 

In general, CMOS was low power and had slow switching speeds. 7400 was fast-switching and power hungry.

 

Here's some beginner info.  

 

https://electronicsclub.info/74series.htm

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_4000-series_integrated_circuits

 

You can learn about these from the old book, Don Lancaster's CMOS Cookbook. This was in my high school library, and I didn't understand it at the time or didn't get excited about the projects. I got some CD4000 boards from TI's dumpster with CD4000 having date codes like 1974, and pulled them for future use, which never happened. (Also plain 7400 chips, no LS.) I found that stockpile recently.

 

Our community has used exclusively TTL 74LSxx series logic, or 74HCTxx CMOS TTL compatible. So CMOS is not very much in demand, unless you need to fix pinball machines with these parts. 

 

The 74HC parts are also CMOS that match the 7400 functions, not compatible because different voltage thresholds. CMOS Cookbook lists the equivalents, like 7400 (quad NAND gates) is the CD4011. So you'll probably see a lot of 4011s.

 

Thanks for sharing, it's always interesting looking back. But putting these parts to use is not very appealing. There might still be some goodies I didn't look closely at.

 

 

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55 minutes ago, Mehridian Sanders said:

Last 1980's question. Should I try and revive this programmer ? Or should I sell it and save for a newer one?

Sent from my SM-G955U using Tapatalk
 

 

Ugh.  Xeltek has about 50 newer models. This one was last supported on DOS 4.0 or Win XP/9X/NT/2000.
 

It will probably do 2532s and 2764s, which need a higher voltage that new programmers don't supply. I have tubes of 40-pin chips with EPROM that I never intend to use...

 

legacy-programmer-download-center

 

You might be able to reuse the 40-pin ZIF socket.

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(I rarely ever reprogram eeproms. The few instances in which I desperately did need to, I just "abused" an old network card (with flashable eeprom socket) and used its flash utility.)

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That programmer will do 2532s, 2532As, and 2564s. All three are used in the TI--and as they require 21V-25V to program (in the case of the 2564s, they only program at 25V), most modern programmers have trouble with them--and almost no modern programmers can program a 25V chip.

 

On 74XX chips, a lot of TI disk controllers use the 7438, not the later LS versions. Disk controllers are about the only PEB cards I've seen that use any 74XX chips though.

Edited by Ksarul

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Little known fact - the TL866 will easily and consistently do TMS2532 and TMS2532A's with the proper adapter and chip template selection. The TMS2564's might be another matter since I haven't tried them.

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