Jump to content
abbotkinneydude

How often do you use GitHub to store/share your A8 code? (+ merging question)

Recommended Posts

Posted (edited)

Hello everyone,

 

I'm currently part of a coding bootcamp to broaden my overall coding knowledge and they make us use GitHub left and right to store all of our code.

 

I am wondering if many on this board are using GitHub to store/share A8 code (especially for collaborations).

 

Also, when you are dealing with a program that requires several "slices" of assembly sub-programs, how do you do you merge them all to come up with a .xex binary (or else).

 

For instance, the code of Desert Falcon (ATARI 7800 version; development name: SPHINX) is now on GitHub but it's broken down into several sub-programs, how do you merge all that stuff?

 

Thank you for your insights.

 

https://github.com/videogamepreservation/sphinx-7800

Edited by abbotkinneydude

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

Hello,

 

I have checked the sphinx-7800 project, there is ZERODEF.S that links all other includes together.

I do not use github for my Atari projects, simply because it does not allow private repositories for free.

I do use sourceforge and SVN repositories (even now sourceforge provides git repos as well).

 

BR,

M.

Edited by matosimi

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, matosimi said:

Hello,

 

I have checked the sphinx-7800 project, there is ZERODEF.S that links all other includes together.

I do not use github for my Atari projects, simply because it does not allow private repositories for free.

I do use sourceforge and SVN repositories (even now sourceforge provides git repos as well).

 

BR,

M.

Actually Github does allow private repos for free - https://github.com/pricing

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Are you specifically interested in use of Github, or the git version control system?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Not a fan of Github, I tried using it with a small Arduino project and found it really messy, it's not very user friendly

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I try to push everything to work on to github, as a backup and as a possible public interest to anyone who stumbles across them.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 4/3/2020 at 9:38 AM, TGB1718 said:

Not a fan of Github, I tried using it with a small Arduino project and found it really messy, it's not very user friendly

Tell me about it.  I struggled the past few days at work automating a build and deployment process using PowerShell and GIT.  I haven't sworn so much that I can remember!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

i use git hub. but i hate it. 

i my previous work, we used to work with microsoft TFS, which was very convenient , but was very "heavy"

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 4/2/2020 at 8:42 PM, abbotkinneydude said:

For instance, the code of Desert Falcon (ATARI 7800 version; development name: SPHINX) is now on GitHub but it's broken down into several sub-programs, how do you merge all that stuff?

 

So if I understand correctly you ask how to assemble all files into one? I'd expect that either one of the files includes the rest or you'd have to create such a file yourself which just includes all the sources.

 

As for git, I'm using it, as well as other source control management systems. It mostly doesn't make much sense when you're working by yourself in projects, the overhead is a bit more than other programs like subversion. But that's mostly down to the individual. Just try it out and see how it works out for you, don't take our words for granted :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've been using github for work and "hobby" for many years, so I am used to it. Out of curiosity, do you guys rely more on command line or some github GUI?

 

What do you guys feel messy about it?

 

Cheers

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've been using git for quite a long time now, really like it, imported most of my old svn trees with Atari projects into git and also push some of them to github.

 

Main reason for doing that is that I wanted to give people easy access to my git trees and I was too lazy to setup cgit on the server I use as a centralized storage for most of my git trees.

 

The beauty of git is that you can easily add as many remotes as you like and decide what you push to/pull from them.

 

About two months ago I installed gitlab on one of the RPi4s sitting unused on the shelve and setup a CI to automatically build one of my Atari projects in a docker container whenever I pushed changes to it. This was more for fun and about playing with GitLab CI though.

 

I'm using github with a couple of other open source projects (LibreELEC, Raspberry Pi kernel) and while the general project workflow functions (like pull requests, reviews etc) are quite OK the github web UI has some really annoying quirks:

 

One of it is that the commits (eg in a pull request) are displayed ordered by author date, not commit date. This really creates a mess if you picked/merged commits in a very specific order.

 

The online editing functions are also something you should better not use, as it'll create a new commit on each change. Not sure if there's some easy way to squash that via the webui.

 

Most of the time I work with git on the command line as I can easily fetch github PRs into local branches (or just fetch the branch of the user PR'ing the change) to review/test them, for LibreELEC I use a rather simple shell script to automatically do an octopus merge of all my feature branches and other remote branches I use/need for testing into a test branch - and then build and test with that.

 

When I'm fine with my local feature branch(es) I push the to my github repo and PR them for review - and then enter the usual comment/fixup/squash/rebase/... cycle.

 

so long,

 

Hias

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yup, add me to the list of happy GitHub users. I've been a consistent user now since 2015, and have over 40 projects there, and have public projects lots of other places from earlier. I love the way GitHub (and GitLab) works.

 

It's critical, imho, that everything I do is done publically, as I consider my time and effort best spent trying to keep retrocomputing knowledge alive and published.

 

-Thom

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...