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Universal worldwide 650 Watt Fully Modular Power Supply for the Amiga , Atari XL/XE, and various other computer systems

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Universal worldwide 650 Watt Fully Modular Power Supply for the Amiga , Atari XL/XE, and various other computer systems

 

(100-240 volts AC 50-60 Hz)

 

*** This is a high-end 2018 fully modular prototype concept that I decided not to bring into production since it would have cost too much money to make the several different modular cables for the various 70’s, 80’s, and 90’s systems. Most people today appear to be interested in dedicated power supplies for their systems ***

 

Back in 2018 I was using a Fully Modular EVGA 650 Watt Power Supply with a Amiga A500 and a Atari 130XE. This is a product that was developed back in 2018 with fully modular 100% working Gold plated power cables for the Atari 600XL/800XL/65XE/130XE/800XE/XEGS computers.  This modular power supply also works with the Amiga 500/500+/600/1200 series computers. Plus any other videogame or computer system that uses 3.3 volts DC, 5 volts DC, 12 volts DC, and -12 volts DC. Fully modular ATX power supplies including modern 2020 models are except from the energy efficiency level VI requirement since they were engineered and manufactured to be used internally inside a desktop computer tower or case (So that is why 100% of all ATX power supplies are not level VI since they were designed for use inside a computer case). However if one places rubber feet on the bottom of a ATX power supply so that the table surface does not get scratched,  ATX power supplies are safe to be used as a fully modular power supply for classic 70’s, 80’s, and 90’s computer and videogame systems. One advantage of ATX power supplies is that they are a high-end regulated power supply that normally outperforms all other power supplies. Fully modular ATX power supplies are between $60-$500+. The advantage of using a Fully modulated ATX power supply over a regular ATX power supply, is the fact that one does not need to open the power supply to make modifications to the power supplies internal wire harness which voids the manufactories warranty. With fully modular ATX power supplies since the power supply cover never needs to be opened, the warranty is never voided. One just needs to use their existing videogame or computer wire harness and place a ATX style modular connector on the other end (Or find a professional ATX power supply company to make the modular cables for the Amiga, Atari, and other systems that one wants to support). There has never been a 100% fully modular ATX power supply that uses the -5 volts DC feature. Also all ATX power supplies made since around 2014 no longer offer the -5 volts DC feature. This means a fully modular ATX power supply cannot be used with systems like the ColecoVision and ADAM which requires the -5 volts DC feature. ATX power supplies cannot be used with the Commodore 64/128 since a ATX power supply cannot generate 9 volts AC. However, any videogame system or computer system that only needs 3.3 volts DC, 5 volts DC, 12 volts DC, and -12 volts DC will work with a fully modular ATX power supply. ATX power supplies are 100% compatible with the Amiga 500/500+/600/1200 series computers and the Atari 600XL/800XL/65XE/130XE/800XE/XEGS computers.       

 

When it comes to systems like ATARI XL/XE and Commodore Amiga that do not require -5 Volts DC, I have decided to use a fully modular ATX power supply since the power supply never needs to be opened up and the warranty will not be voided, also there is neat looking custom modular cables that can be plugged into the side of the ATX power supply.

   

When making custom cables for a fully modular ATX power supply I highly recommend only using the EVGA brand of power supplies

 

Some people experience ground loop hum in the audio and video signal when using a 3 prong power supply. For those that experience random noise from the ground from the power company, if one purchases a 2 prong power supply or buys a video/audio ground loop eliminator it will fix the problem. For more detailed information about this ground loop issue click here to take you to the dedicated thread.

 

I tried several different brands of fully modular ATX power supplies and many of them have poor quality short circuit protection and one brand does not trip the circuit when certain rails are shorted. Some brands of fully modular ATX power supplies require unplugging the power cord and plugging it back in and waiting awhile to reset the circuit breaker. On one brand that offered 0.8 amps on the -12 volt rail it had a nice silent fan. However I discovered a major flaw in the design of the power supply that forced me not to use that brand of power supply. All or most ATX power supplies have short circuit protection where the ATX power supply well turn itself off and trip an internal circuit breaker if a short is detected. The problem is this one brand and model of ATX power supply does not offer any short circuit at all on the 5 volt DC rail. Since there is no short circuit protection on the 5 volt rail for this one brand and model of ATX power supply, if one shorts out the 5 volt rail with a screwdriver small sparks and a literal flame that melts plastic can occur. This one brand and model of ATX power supply even causes a heavy gauge wire on the 5 volt rail to literal burn up since the power supply has no short circuit protection breaker that trips on the 5 volt rail. Only on the 12 volt and 3.3 volt rail had short circuit protection. Back in 2018 I reported the problem to the company where I purchased that ATX power supply and currently in 2020 that model is out of production so I will not mention the brand (hopefully the company does not have other ATX power supply models with no circuit breaker and no short circuit protection on the 5 volt rail). Another issue is if one trips the circuit breaker on the 12 volt DC or 3.3 volt DC rail one has to disconnect the main modular cable and reconnect the cable to get the power supply to work again (Other brands one just turns the power switch on and off to reset the internal circuit breaker).   Some brands of ATX power supplies had short circuit protection on all their rails, but some the circuit breaker took awhile to trip.  

 

Overall the EVGA brand of power supplies that are engineered in the USA and made in China using high-end components were the best power supplies to use. EVGA power supplies have excellent short circuit protection on all their rails that instantly trips the circuit breaker when there is a short. Also the internal breaker is easily reset with the flip of the on/off switch on the power supply. Back in 2018 I used the EVGA 650 B3 Plus Bronze 650 Watt power supply which is the best fully modular power supply to use so far (Price $79.99 and sometimes on sale for $59.99): The high-end desktop computers that I have built over the decades, and in the last several years I normally use the top of the line 1600 Watt $500+ EVGA model of power supplies. I had the opportunity to get a 650 watt EVGA power supply for $59.99 plus shipping (normally $79.99) back in 2018. The one negative is this power supply -12 volt DC rail is only 0.5 amps instead of 0.8 amps. However, 0.5 amps on the -12 volt DC rail is better than many power supplies on the market that are only 0.3 amps. The EVGA 650 watt power supply has instant short protection even on the 5 volt rail. Every time I took a screwdriver and touched the pins on the 7 pin ATARI DIN plug the EVGA power supply instantly turned off. So the main reason I used this power supply for the ATARI and Commodore computers back in 2018 is because the equipment well be protected if a short occurs and also no fire hazard since this power supply works correctly for short protection on all rails including 5 volts. In addition, when the circuit breaker trips, one just turns the power switch on the power supply off and then one flips the power supply back on 2 second later and it starts working again. Also the EVGA has an “ECO” mode that turns the fan completely off and the fan well only come on if the load and temperature of the power supply detects that it needs the fan. EVGA power supplies are FCC certified and have the CE Europe safety certification. However EVGA power supplies including the top of the line $500+ models are not UL listed. UL listed is a optional certification in the United States. 

 

Therefore, so far the EVGA power supply is the best for this project because of 3 reasons:

 

(one) EVGA so far has the best instant short protection that instantly trips on all rails including 5 volts DC.

 

(two) EVGA is easier to use with a simple flip of the on/off switch to reset the internal circuit breaker.

 

(three) EVGA is one of the rare models that disables the fan from spinning and only turns on the fan when the temperature and load requires it (ECO mode on feature).

 

The only issue with the EVGA 650 watt power supply is that it costs around $79.99 and some consumers want something cheaper for their classic 80’s and 90’s. computer.

Also once you add the cost of a fully modular power supply for around $80+, then one has to create the modular cables for each system. It can cost anywhere from $10-$30+ for each high-quality custom  modular cable. Many consumers are most likely not interested in a complete modular power supply concept if the entire power supply with custom cables is going to cost $150-$200+. Therefore I placed this project on hold 2 years ago and it never was fully developed or released  to the public. Most consumers would rather pay $30-$60+ for each individual power supply instead of a fully modular design that costs between $150-$200+.    

EVGA RETAIL BOX.JPG

EVGA power supply.JPG

EVGA switches.JPG

Fully modular jacks.JPG

Bottom view with feet added.JPG

ATARI CABLE.JPG

ATARI COMPUTER.JPG

ATARI COMPUTER 2.JPG

ATARI COMPUTER 4.JPG

AMIGA COMPUTER.JPG

Edited by HDTV1080P

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It's a nice concept, especially for those who have a bunch of machines nearby each other. I have some minor concerns though... First off, a quick search doesn't throw up and detailed specifications on the unit. I'd like to know a few things:

- Is the over/undervoltage protection applied to each rail individually, or to just the primary rail (12V)?

- How tight are those protections on the 5V rail?
- What's the minimum load requirement on the 12V rail? Is there also a minimum load requirement on the 5V rail? All PSUs have one, and it's required to keep *all* the rails in spec. In my experience, the higher the maximum output power of an ATX PSU, the higher the minimum load requirements, so personally I would aim for the *lowest* power output ATX PSU I could find). PSUs are designed for a minimum load to enable them to regulate their outputs. If the minimum load isn't met, a PSU's output can drift or become noisy, both of which can cause trouble for any attached machines.

 

The -12V rail isn't a concern (at leas, in Amiga terms anyway). The original PSUs typically only provided 0.1A of current on the -12V rail, and didn't even use all of that.

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Those are all good questions that are not offered in the detailed spec sheets online. When comparing many different brands of ATX power supplies the EVGA was the best for a nice stable voltage output during surges and under voltage. Also the absolute best when it comes to short circuit protection. The power supply instantly shuts off when there is a minor short condition. The smallest wattage capacity for fully modular ATX power supplies on the market start at around 550 watts as a entry level. Back in 2018 I went with the model above which was the 650 watt model which worked great for the tested computer systems.

 

EVGA power supplies are engineered in the United States and made in China using the best electronic components available. They come with a 10 year warranty (Some cheaper models have a 5 year warranty). However good luck finding a EVGA power supply in stock since there has been a big run on them and prices have massively inflated on the power supplies. The EVGA company appears to be having troubles getting the power supplies in stock (which are used in desktop computers since they can literally last 10-20+ years without needing to be replaced).

 

For example the top of the line EVGA SuperNOVA Titanium model 220-T2-1600-X1 use to sale for around $400, however now the power supply has a list price of $549.99 with a limit of one per household because of inflation and hard to get stocking issues.

https://www.evga.com/products/product.aspx?pn=220-T2-1600-X1

 

https://www.evga.com/products/Specs/PSU.aspx?pn=50804bf2-4d32-4e90-b338-c81ca63af4e2

 

Even the lower cost 1000 watt models are currently all out of stock

https://www.evga.com/products/ProductList.aspx?type=10&family=Power+Supplies&chipset=1000+Watts

 

All fully modular 650 watt ATX power supplies are also all out of stock

https://www.evga.com/products/ProductList.aspx?type=10&family=Power+Supplies&chipset=650+Watts

 

 

 

So this project that I started back in 2018 cannot become a reality if I cannot find the 650 watt full modular EVGA power supply in stock for a price around $80. Some dealers now charge $106 for the power supply. I have not found anotherr brand of fully modular power supply that I would like to use for classic 70’s, 80’s, and 90’s computer systems.  

 

Edited by HDTV1080P

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I'm sure the reliability of those power supplies is great, but the problem long-term is that if you're using less than the minimum load, you're possibly stressing out the PSU more than if you were just running it at the minimum, since it could be struggling to regulate itself. It would be wise to check the level of ripple on the 5V rail, as this can sometimes become excessive when minimum loads aren't met, and won't show up on a multimeter reading that might otherwise show ideal output conditions. I share your care and appreciation for vintage systems, but from that perspective I'd be more inclined to go for a PSU that has more modest ratings. You're into a different world then of course, with casing requirements, mails-level wiring and so on... But industrial PSU modules can easily match the life span of EVGA PSUs, have better regulation, are smaller, cheaper, and can be more efficient, all due to being designed for loads closer to those of vintage machines. Check out supplies from the likes of Traco Power, Mean Well and Artesyn for some well-known (in industry) brands. For example, this PSU is 45W (remember, an Amiga uses around 10W, and 8-bit machines are generally between 5 and 15W), a minimum load requirement below the typical usage of a vintage machine, and has a MTBF rating of 550,000 hours (equivalent of around 60 years), making it so reliable that it's qualified for use in medical equipment. And all for £33.48 including VAT. Of course, the cost saving will get absorbed by the case and connectors needed, but given the choice, I'd go for the custom solution every time over the EVGA.

 

Another advantage of building your own PSU like this is that is that you can also include an AC transformer in the same case for a 9V AC output, so that powering machines like the C64 or older A8s don't need a second supply.

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I am happy using the EVGA fully modular ATX power supply with my Commodore Amiga and the Atari 130XE computer. The EVGA power supplies puts out a nice stable voltage on minimum loads even way below 0.1 amps. In fact, there are people with Commodore Amiga’s that have been using a Amiga power cord connected to a ATX power supply for several years. I like the full modular ATX power supply concept since if in the rare chance a power supply goes bad one just unplugs the Amiga and ATARI cord from the ATX power supply and plugs the cord into the exact brand and model of EVA power supply. The power supply already has all the required safety certifications. If one makes a power supply from scratch there are sometimes issues with reselling the external power supply like getting the required level VI and FCC for USA market and CE for Europe safety certification.

 

I like the fully modular power supply concept instead of separate power supplies for every computer and videogame system in existence. It is awesome that each year there appears to be more and more power supply choices for consumers.

Edited by HDTV1080P

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Posted (edited)

EVGA makes the absolute best computer power supplies, some models like the top of the line EVGA SuperNOVA Titanium model 220-T2-1600-X1 has inflated in value to around $600. That power supply use to cost around $400, and it is made so well in the China automated factory that it can literally last up to 20+years running 24 x 7. Many people have EVGA power supplies and other high-end power supply brands that are over 10 years old and they run their computers 24 x 7 and never shut them off. Personally, I have not had to replace a power supply for over 10 years now. Oldest family members computer is around 13 years old and the computer runs 24 x 7.

 

In the past EVGA power supplies, motherboards, and other computer equipment was always being made in a high-end automated robotic factory in China. However now 100% of EVGA production has been switched to Taiwan according to my sources. Just order any new model EVGA power supply or other EVGA product and you well see that it now says on the box made in Taiwan. It appears that the EVGA automated Taiwan factory is making the same quality power supplies and computer equipment as the China automated factory did. But I have not personally tested the new power supply models made in Taiwan, but the specs are around the same quality for the new models being made in Taiwan. I noticed that for various reasons some other companies around the world have also switched their production from China to Taiwan.    

Edited by HDTV1080P

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On 6/28/2021 at 6:19 PM, HDTV1080P said:

EVGA makes the absolute best computer power supplies, some models like the top of the line EVGA SuperNOVA Titanium model 220-T2-1600-X1 has inflated in value to around $600. That power supply use to cost around $400, and it is made so well in the China automated factory that it can literally last up to 20+years running 24 x 7. Many people have EVGA power supplies and other high-end power supply brands that are over 10 years old and they run their computers 24 x 7 and never shut them off. Personally, I have not had to replace a power supply for over 10 years now. Oldest family members computer is around 13 years old and the computer runs 24 x 7.

 

In the past EVGA power supplies, motherboards, and other computer equipment was always being made in a high-end automated robotic factory in China. However now 100% of EVGA production has been switched to Taiwan according to my sources. Just order any new model EVGA power supply or other EVGA product and you well see that it now says on the box made in Taiwan. It appears that the EVGA automated Taiwan factory is making the same quality power supplies and computer equipment as the China automated factory did. But I have not personally tested the new power supply models made in Taiwan, but the specs are around the same quality for the new models being made in Taiwan. I noticed that for various reasons some other companies around the world have also switched their production from China to Taiwan.    

Over the last 3 months I have been spending several weeks, days, and hours doing extensive tests on the new entry level EVGA non-modular ATX power supplies made in Taiwan and also the entry level EVGA fully modular power supplies made in Taiwan. While the quality of the Taiwan power supplies appears to be just as good as the ones that were made in China. EVGA engineered a different way on the new models that makes it harder to recover from short circuits (that engineering issue has nothing to do with where the power supplies are being made). The advantage of the 650 watt fully modular EVGA power supplies that were made in China many years ago (the power supply that is in the first post in this thread). Is that the old EVGA power supply after a short circuit one could recover from the short circuit with a flip of the on/off switch on the power supply. While the new entry level power supplies made in Taiwan have just as good of short circuit protection on all the rails when compared to the old models made in China. The problem is one must attach a momentary reset switch to the new models of EVGA power supplies in order to recover from a short, since a simple unplugging the power supply power cord or flipping the on off switch well not reset the power supply. While its true that desktop computer cases already have a momentary on/off reset switches. For my shorting experiments I needed to wire up a momentary reset switch so that the power supply recovers. The new EVGA power supplies from Taiwan have been shorted several hundred times, and they always recover once I press the external reset button I wired up. This power supply is good for an Amiga computer (ATX power supplies offer native +12, -12, +5, and + 3.3 volts DC). I have developed what some would call breakthrough techniques that converts any modern ATX power supply to offer -5 volts DC without needing any soldering or modifications to the circuit board. Basically, one converts 12 volts DC to -5 volts DC by using a add on DC regulator to the existing wire harness. Then one adds a special high current diode in order to offer short circuit protection for the add on -5 volts DC rail (Yes diodes do not work with negative voltages, but there are ways to get around that issue). The EVGA power supply already offers perfect short circuit protection on its built in +12, -12, and +5 volt rail. All one is doing is adding a device to the wire harness so the EVGA power supply can also do -5 volts DC while at the same time offering perfect short circuit protection to the -5 volts DC add on regulator.  I have a lot of various projects going on right now, and if I have time in the future, I well share how to convert any modern ATX power supply on the market, so that it works with the ColecoVision or ADAM and some of the parts I used to do so. So, one ATX power supply could power the Amiga computer, and ADAM computer at the exact same time if one has the proper wire harness for both systems. Plus, if anyone wants to make a HDMI graphics card for the ColecoVision/ADAM there would be enough power to power a high-end custom HDMI graphics card (but I do not have any plans on making graphics cards, too busy with power supply projects and other various projects). One of the time stamp devices that I purchased is telling me its June 25th, so I am going to need to try to change that to September  5th 2021 (weird since it supposed to get its signal from a database that uses an atomic clock).

 

It’s always good to have a UPS power backup system so when testing the Amiga or Adam computer the power does not go off to the computer on the test bench that is running 24 x 7. UPS power backup systems range in price between $50 to $60,000+ from Tripp Lite, Cyperpower systems and various other companies. With the average consumer buying UPS power backups under $1,000, and most of the time under $300 for the average consumer depending on how many watts they are trying to power during a power outage. The higher-end models produce a pure sine wave output when the power is off, where as the simulated sine wave UPS power backup are the entry level models for under $200. Sometimes when on sale a very low wattage entry level simulated sine wave model can be purchased for around $40. I currently use an entry level pure sine wave UPS power backup that cost around $250 for the work bench that I connect the Amiga and Adam too.

 

For over two decades (over twenty years) I have been purchasing UPS power backup units from Cyberpower systems at least one every year for family members and I. Sometimes for the home computer, home theater system, and many various systems that need UPS power backups to protect against surges and brownouts. Some units I purchased for $40 each while others for around $700 over the last few decades. In the last 20+ years Cyberpower systems has always had their UPS power supplies made in China. I have some units that are around 20 years old. Sometimes they last 20 years other times they get a very bad surge from lighting issues and they last 7 years or less. But the attached equipment does not need replaced during power surges and brownouts. Anyways for 20+ years all the Cyberpower systems UPS power backups that I have purchased over the years have been made in an automated factory in China. To my surprise when I just recently ordered a UPS power backup from a Cyberpower reseller in August of 2021, this new unit was made in the Philippines. I did some research and its my understanding that Cyberpower systems has switched all their production from China to the Philippines. While the quality of the UPS power backups coming from the Philippines appears to be exactly the same as the quality of the UPS power backups that were made in China, I was somewhat surprised they moved production out of China. For various reasons many companies are moving production from China to other countries like Taiwan, Japan, Philippines, Vietnam, Mexico, and many other different countries around the world. For some consumer electronic categories, China use to supply 95% of the world with high quality products at a excellent price. While there are shortages in raw materials that are causing delays in products on the shelf. There is also another reason why its hard to get certain products and there is sometimes 6 month delays or more for certain products that consumers want and need. China use to make around 95% of certain products for the world, and when several companies decide to switch production to another country, many other countries are being flooded with orders that their automated factories cannot keep up. Some companies may have to move production back to China in order to keep up with supply and demand, or the factories in Taiwan, Philippines, and other countries may need to increase their output by expanding their factory size and run the factories 24 x 7 to keep up with demand for some products. There are still many companies that have a good relationship with China and they are not planning on switching production since China makes high quality products at excellent prices.

 

It would be interesting to discuss why many companies around the world are switching their production from China to other countries. That would require an interview with the CEO’s of several different companies. Many people believe the COVID-19 pandemic is a naturally occurring virus in nature and that China is not responsible for the virus (other people would disagree). Many people grew up in a Republic or Democratic form of government and prefer that form of governmental system over communism. However, trading with China started occurring in the 90’s and got a big boost from President Clinton in the year 2000 when he signed a historic bill granting permanent normal trade relations with China. Back in October 10th 2000 Clinton signed the China Trade Bill into law which resulted in China providing most the electronic products and other products for the United States and rest of the world. As long as it remains legal to do business with China then some companies will continue to purchase from China since China makes high quality products at an excellent price. Some companies and individuals started purchasing from China back in 2019, since for the last 20 years almost everyone else was doing so. Now it has become unpopular to purchase products from China according to some people’s worldview. However, the United States government and many other countries still have a trade agreement with China which makes trading with China legal.                         

Edited by HDTV1080P

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