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amiman99

I saw a person with scanner in Goodwill scanning books.

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7 hours ago, Keatah said:

That's when I walk away.

 

Sometimes I give the speech that the stuff is old, and used, and therefore is worth only a fraction of the original price. Junk don't accumulate no value!

Not had to yet, but I've always thought if/when I walk away from such a person, if they're fussy I would point out both Ebay & PayPal offer returns and/or money back for broken or defective items- so unless they're gonna do the same, I expect to pay less.

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There is nothing wrong with that, put yourself into the shoes of someone struggling to get by, seems like this is not really even worth discussing.  People are starving and losing everything, left and right.

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I get the ill will toward the scanner people because they are presumably mining out the cool and/or interesting stuff and we can't get the same thrill of the hunt when looking through ourselves that we used to get decades ago.  On the other hand, if its a charity or donation shop, generally their purpose is to sell these used items to raise money for charity, or to sell used items at a low cost to directly help people who don't have a lot of money, so the only care they have is that something is sold, it doesn't matter if its sold to a collector who wants to flip it for resale, or a collector who is hunting for items to keep, or if its sold to a poor person who wants to just own or use the item as it is.

 

I agree, it takes a bit of the fun out of things if you are looking over items that are very picked over. However, on the other hand, this is equating "fun items" with "expensive items".  Presumably the scanner resellers are leaving everything they cannot make a good enough markup on - there should still be some interesting cheap stuff left over which could be of interest to someone who wants to buy for themselves as opposed to reselling, right?  Of course, I've also heard of people that will have a special arrangement with a donation/thrift store that they will buy ANY video game stuff that comes in, so that stuff never even makes it to the shelf to be seen by others, also people that will hound a family doing a yardsale to let them look over stuff before the yardsale even opens.  I think those arrangements are kind of lame ;)

Edited by sirlynxalot

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5 hours ago, sirlynxalot said:

On the other hand, if its a charity or donation shop, generally their purpose is to sell these used items to raise money for charity, or to sell used items at a low cost to directly help people who don't have a lot of money, so the only care they have is that something is sold, it doesn't matter if its sold to a collector who wants to flip it for resale, or a collector who is hunting for items to keep, or if its sold to a poor person who wants to just own or use the item as it is.

Blazing Lazers makes a good point on why this is bad for shops in the long run:

 

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I agree it kills my motivation to check out these places as a casual treasure seeker/collector, but for thrift stores like goodwill or salvation army, I don't think it makes a lot of difference at the end of the day that the casual collector customers are put off from going.  My thought is that instead of having 30 casual collector customers buying 30 items of "the good stuff" in a week, they'll have 3 barcode scanner guys loading up and buying 30 items of "the good stuff" for their resale business each week instead.  At the end of the day it doesn't matter to the thrift store because they get the same amount of cash either way.

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19 minutes ago, sirlynxalot said:

I agree it kills my motivation to check out these places as a casual treasure seeker/collector, but for thrift stores like goodwill or salvation army, I don't think it makes a lot of difference at the end of the day that the casual collector customers are put off from going.  My thought is that instead of having 30 casual collector customers buying 30 items of "the good stuff" in a week, they'll have 3 barcode scanner guys loading up and buying 30 items of "the good stuff" for their resale business each week instead.  At the end of the day it doesn't matter to the thrift store because they get the same amount of cash either way.

It might not matter to the store short-term, but it should matter to them long term. The goods being sold are donated by the community as an act of charity. If the public perception shifts to these places being a haven for merchants and ebay flippers, and not serving the community, I suspect that supply of goods will begin to dry up.

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Just throwing out my opinion.  I don't think the majority of people who donate to my local thrift stores do it because they want to donate to charity. I think it is mostly done out of convenience for the donator, such as when the donator wants to clean out their home for a spring cleaning, or a relative passes away, or they are moving, etc and it is easier to take a car load of small presumed low value used stuff to the thrift store than to do a yard sale, craigslist, or throw it away in the small home trash bin.  In my experience of going to goodwills and salvation armies and noticing the customers and what they are buying, I don't think the main customer base is collectors, I think it's low income families looking for cheap clothes, furniture and household items.  I don't think barcode scanners buying all the rare books, video games, records and small electronics and driving away the casual treasure hunters makes a big dent in the customer base.

 

There are places that are for profit entertainment exchanges. One I know if is a chain of stores called Bookmans in Arizona, which buys and sells used books, games, records, electronics, action figures, comics etc., basically all the cool/vintage stuff you'd want to find at a thrift store or yard sale.  Usually the prices are closer to ebay level but you might find deals here and there. If a barcode scanner were doing their thing at this kind of place and driving away customers, I agree that would erode the customer base and be bad for business.

Edited by sirlynxalot

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5 hours ago, RevEng said:

It might not matter to the store short-term, but it should matter to them long term. The goods being sold are donated by the community as an act of charity. If the public perception shifts to these places being a haven for merchants and ebay flippers, and not serving the community, I suspect that supply of goods will begin to dry up.

They actually have around here, and when you do find stuff, it's currently using ebay to write the price on a card or print up a simple sticker.  As that earlier post said, I use the phone too for even the cheap stuff to see if I'm not paying what I'd pay online for it or worse.  Right now if a game is worth $10 or $50 they'll ask that, and eventually someone does buy it because they're gone as I know the local rule under the territory around here is NOT to put it on shop goodwill.  They do trash items after a few weeks or months depending on the value though, sooner if it eats up more space.  So yeah the scanner and phone flipper types are making two impacts.  One, stuff isn't being put into the stores as much as they were a year or two ago, and two - the prices are now at the ebay BIN pricing that people snap stuff up at.

 

I do my fair share of buying, trading, selling, keeping some and not the rest because I don't have a choice or I'd have no money to have a hobby, but it's definitely not a job or I'd quit it and likely never have started it in the first place only dumping stuff I ended up hating or getting bored of.  Right now if going to goodwill wasn't right in the path of my kids school for pick up, I wouldn't bother and I sure as hell won't go out of the way other than one day on the weekend just to get out and have some quiet for a few hours and that's it.  People have already more or less ruined this area, and seeing posts about on social media and forums like this I'm not alone...it's easily by the zip code or clusters of them where it's the same and others are still honey pots full of those who don't check ebay before posting and it seems to be spreading from my impression.

 

I could not wholeheartedly agree with that one snarky point enough, love it the day ebay STOPS listing paid prices on stuff. Sure show they completed and sold, but like bidder names, put a *** through it.  That'll really set people off not knowing what to go with anymore.

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Resellers >>> Hoarders. Resellers do nothing except move an item from one market to another. The item still ends up in the hands of someone that wants it. It just doesnt end up in the hands of someone that wants it for below fair market value. The hoarder gets all the stuff cheap, keeps it out of the hands of anyone else even though there’s not enough time in a lifetime to enjoy most of it, and causes the fair market value to increase because their mental illness is decreasing the supply. 

Everyone likes getting a deal, but no one is entitled to it. If finding a good book/game/movie whatever is THAT important to you, do what you must to get there first. 

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My company hires Goodwill(distribution center) to assemble some parts for us. Whenever I visit the site there is always an employee scanning every book that gets donated and then palletizing the good ones for sale on Amazon. I would guess this makes the resellers job even harder as the cream is already picked. Perhaps some stores put donations directly on the shelves but most around here sort them for maximum profits.

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1 hour ago, DidSomeoneSayAtari? said:

Whenever I visit the site there is always an employee scanning every book that gets donated and then palletizing the good ones for sale on Amazon. 

I did see books on Amazon that are sold by Goodwill, games too. Interesting.

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On 10/10/2020 at 11:21 PM, amiman99 said:

Like the title says, I saw a guy with a portable scanner and a cell phone scanning barcodes on books in Goodwill, and then putting some of them in a basket to buy.

Do anyone knows what they may looking for, is it a high price books for resell or something else?

I think I have seen it before, but did not think anything of it.

 

Kids these days, back in my day you had to memorize all the rare stuff to resell ;)

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