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andymanone

VCS BIOS Password

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Do not press the enter key continuously...just hit it...but continue connecting the pins. UEFI is tricky. In my case it worked in 2 out of 3 attempts 😉

Edited by Charles Darwin

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8 minutes ago, Charles Darwin said:

Do not press the enter key continuously...just hit it...but continue connecting the pins. UEFI is tricky. In my case it worked in 2 out of 3 attempts 😉

Yes, sorry, maybe I worded it wrong,

of course I hit the Enter Button only for one time (while shorten the pins)  🙂.

Edited by andymanone

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Just now, Charles Darwin said:

Try it without the switch...just connect the cables.

That idea I had also in my mind, maybe the cable are "too" long and get bad due to interferences.

I´ll try it asap.

 

Btw:
I´m a little bit confused by reading David Zou´s  article, because he said for UEFI BIOS you have to short the pins first time after "Power on" the system (just after init the screen) ...

 

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@andymanone

You can try it too. It's Just harder to find the right moment.

 

And again ... this is dangerous stuff...If something goes wrong you end up with a non-working bios 😉

Edited by Charles Darwin
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Ahh, great! I got success!

 

It was the lenght of the cables!

After I shortened the cables it works :cool:👍

 

 

1610801063218.JPEG

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12 minutes ago, andymanone said:

1610801063218.JPEG

Any overclocking features in the ADVANCED tab? ;-) (I kid kinda but that sort of thing truly does interest me, since I don't own one...)

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27 minutes ago, Clint Thompson said:

Just whatever you do... do not type in PENCIL as the password.

 

Or click the pi.

π

Edited by x=usr(1536)

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17 hours ago, Charles Darwin said:

I was not able to extract the password, but I was able to change bios settings like legacy boot or virtualization (for virtualbox).

I'm sorry to bother you again, but I faced another issue:

 

I´ve enabled SVM (AMD´s VT) und saved it with F10.

But after booting Win10 it shows me: "VT is not enabled" (-> Task manager) and "AMD-V is NOT enabled in BIOS" (-> with AMD´s Virtualizations Check tool)

I´ve tried it for 3 times...

 

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3 minutes ago, Charles Darwin said:

So you did this? If yes...and it didnt work, you might try to change some other setting and check if it is persistent.

IMG_20210116_160317.jpg

IMG_20210116_160331.jpg

Yes, correct, I did this (shown on your screenshots)....
So I´ll try to change another feature, to see if it will be persistent...

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4 minutes ago, Charles Darwin said:

With "persistent" I dont mean that you will see it, when you open the BIOS next time...but the changed behavior of your system should tell you...e.g. legacy boot...

Yes, I know ;-), you talked about in your first posts 👍🏻!

Edited by andymanone

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Just tested it again. Used a paperclip to enter the BIOS. Changed the SVM-support setting to disable (actually you have to enable it first). Pressed F10 and restarted the machine. Once I tried to run my virtualmachine freeDOS I got an error (see attached image). Restarted again....entered the BIOS (same procedure as every...)...changed SVM-support to enable, F10, restart...VM-freeDOS worked (see image).

You just have to play around to understand the behavior of this hack. Every time you enter the BIOS it displays you the virgin settings. So if you want to apply a change, you have to do a disable/enable thing and F10. Next time you enter the BIOS it's a virgin again ;)

VM freeDOS non working.png

VM freeDOS working.png

Edited by Charles Darwin
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There is one option in the BIOS, which you can easily test it with. It's called "silent boot". Deactivate it, press F10 and check if it shows you the specs of your machine at start.

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8 minutes ago, Charles Darwin said:

There is one option in the BIOS, which you can easily test it with. It's called "silent boot". Deactivate it, press F10 and check if it shows you the specs of your machine at start.

I´ve tried it e.g. with "Num-Lock on", but all changes I´ve done, doesn´t  have any impact....

Now the VCS ist installing "Updates" because I was too slow to interrupt the ATARI OS Boot process 😏 

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Well...on my system I have formatted the main drive with gparted in Linux Mint. I deleted all partitions (lots of EFI partitions). I have an internal M.2 SSD installed, this is my main drive now. Theoretically, it is possible that the Atari team installed some sort of security check on the main drive. On every boot it restores the BIOS....just a guess (dont know if this is possible). I have an AtariOS flash usb stick and already tested it several times. It restores the virgin state of all partitions on the main drive...just in case the current Atari team really comes up with something useful in the future ;-)

Edited by Charles Darwin
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3 minutes ago, Charles Darwin said:

Well...on my system I have formatted the main drive with gparted in Linux Mint. I deleted all partitions (lots of EFI partitions). I have an internal M.2 SSD installed, this is my main drive now. Theoretically, it is possible that the Atari team installed some sort of security check on the main drive. On every boot it restores the BIOS....just a guess. I have a AtariOS flash usb stick and already tested it several times. It restores the virgin state of all partitions on the main drive...just in case the current Atari team really come up with something useful in the future ;-)

Sounds plausible, I guess, you are on the right track....

I´ll take a closer look at it..

 

But regardless, thank you very much for your patience and support👍🏻!

 

andY

 

 

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2 hours ago, andymanone said:

Sounds plausible, I guess, you are on the right track....

I´ll take a closer look at it..

 

But regardless, thank you very much for your patience and support👍🏻!

 

andY

 

 

Okay, now I´m sure, thats the issue....

 

After changing (anything) in the BIOS , e.g. disable "Silent Boot" / "Fast Boot"
It comes up with the proper machine specs and the long Memory test.

 

After than it seems to reboot for two times (black screen, the Fan goes off and on and off again)

And than boots up the ATARI-OS directly in the "Update Routine".

 

I think, like @Charles Darwin said, it restores the native default BIOS settings from an eMMC EFI partition and forces an ATARI-OS Update routine (But there is no new OS Update available)......

 

After these procedure is done, no BIOS settings, I´ve done before, where available again, this confirms my suspicions.....

 

So far so bad 😉, but I am staying on the case and will go on of course...

 

Cheers,

andY

 

 

 

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Interesting...good job!

As I said, I cleaned the eMMC completely (with gparted), so my BIOS changes are persistent. Currently, I just want to use the VCS as a Linux PC with lots of VM images and as a streaming client. If the AtariOS ever evolves to something grown-ups can use...I will use my usb recovery stick to restore the orginal state of the eMMC.

Edited by Charles Darwin
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Yall sure are putting a lot of work into hacking a console most of you spent the last three years passionately hating.  

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 Okay guys,

 

finally I guess, I got it now 😎.

 

After fiddling around with different options and some strange behavior of the VCS,

I have figured out whats do, to make the BIOS changes persistent, without deleting partitions (or the whole ATARI-OS) from the eMMC.

 

- First of all you have to prepare the hardware hack from @Charles Darwin 

- After than go to the BIOS and change all options, you want to change.

- Finally go to "AMD CBS" menu, "choose FCH Common options" , go to "eMMC Options" and than go down to choose "eMMC Boot" (see pictures attached too)
- now choose "Disabled" and press F10 (Save & Exit)

- now let´s reboot the system and start straight forward to the ATARI-OS

- it will be forced an "Dummy" Update procedure, but after it´s done, ATARI-OS works fine, and doesn´t ask again for Updates after reboot (except a real new Update is available)

- now you can start your alternative OS with your prefered proper BIOS settings 😉

 

(See pictures attached....the last two pictures shows the "VT enabled" message from Task manager and from the NOX app too)

 

I tried out this procedure for two times to proof, and it works for me.

 

Cheers,

andY

 

 

 

 

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