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Dr Memory

U1MB Installation Challenges - 800XL

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I watched FJC's video.  I tried to get the installation procedure from lotharek.pl, and immediately hit a serious problem.  That problem is that lotharek.pl appears to be down or at least inaccessible.  When I try, I get this:

image.thumb.png.5923a67e2b7fb68e45d455ba1421b2c8.png

It's been that way all day, possibly longer - I believe I first tried to get this info last night.  I tried a few things to get there, including different web browsers and a different computer, but no joy.  So I went hunting for other sources of these instructions.

 

I actually bought the thing from TBA so I went there.  They had a link to FJC's "extensive user manual", which worked.  This document contains a lot of good info, but alas, no actual installation instructions for the board.  They also had a link to an installation manual, which led to, you guessed it, the lotharek page.  I assume this is a short-term problem and will be fixed soon, but that doesn't help me today.

 

So, off to the Internet Archives.  The various deep links to the product page I found in articles on AtariAge didn't work for me there, but going directly to an archived copy of the top-level lotharek.pl site let me navigate to a product page for the version with the FJC firmware, which is what I have.  One problem with this still is that the embedded links don't really work so well, so I had to do some additional gymnastics with the IA to get readable copies of the pictures.

 

To be clear, I don't think any of this is the fault of the video nor of the product - it's just a problem that added some challenges to the install.

 

Anyway, I saw several mentions of using a CPU diagram (that I couldn't access) to see what CPU pins you need to solder the 4-pin connector to.  I managed to dredge up a copy, again using the IA and a couple of different links to that picture that people had posted previously.  Once I found a working version of that, things sped up.

CPU.thumb.jpg.bf6d1240b48213257652a970b44edebe.jpg

 

So that helped immensely.  It'll become easy to get again once lotharek.pl comes back online, but can't hurt to have here.

 

Somewhere along the way, I found this

http://atariprojects.org/2020/12/30/purchase-and-install-an-ultimate-1mb-board-for-your-atari-800xl-1-3-hours/

 

Which was helpful, but led me to try to figure out what pins, exactly, were being pointed at.

800XL-Motherboard-with-Labels-1024x582.thumb.jpg.826157fb853b54e90612a11c747258ef.jpg

 

I'm a big fan of pin numbers, or at least knowing what the mods I'm installing are actually doing in terms of interfacing with the computer.  So I used a multimeter to try and figure out what pins these are and to verify that they actually match the CPU table above.  Three of them did.  One did not.  Wire 1 did not have continuity with pin 39 of Sally.  This one was pretty funny, in a way - I traced out the circuits in the schematics, and actually went back to the table I made the other day when I looked at all the Phi signals, and found to my surprise that the pin shown (pointed at) only gets Phi 2 when the board is powered!  This can be verified by checking it against POKEY pin 7 or PIA pin 25, which have the same feature.  Phi 2 from Sally is ANDed with +5V in U18D (pins 12 & 13 -> 11) and then passed along to the other chips and to the mystery hole.

 

The other three wires were fine as shown in the picture and showed continuity even w/o power.  I guess I could have ignored that pic and just soldered directly to Sally but that made me uncomfortable so I wanted to do it the other way.  Which worked.  I don't have any better way of describing which spots to use than is shown in that pic, and that's the highest rez I could find.

 

Drilling was a bit of an adventure, just because I've never tried to drill holes in a motherboard before, and one that I care about at that.  Dremel did the job just fine.  On the bright side, the location of the holes doesn't have to be precise, just the spacing, so long as you don't drill into a trace of course.  FJC's video showing hole drilling was helpful here.  For me, being ready to back off if the bit starts to skitter was pretty important.

 

Once I got the holes drilled and the 4 pins soldered on, the rest was easy.  Needless to say, my install isn't as pretty as FJC's - I don't have any of the things needed to shorten the ribbon cables, and I'm not quite sure what he did there when he put on the new connectors anyway, so I've got full length cables.  Meh.  I'll fold em over and make it work when I'm ready to put it back in the case.

 

Amusingly, the author of the lotharek procedure says "Installation of this upgrade takes me approx. 5 minutes and even rookie can handle it at home...".  Um.  Maybe it's a true statement if you have done it before and have ready access to the info, but each challenge you encounter can add quite a lot of time.  Like, socketing the OS ROM and the MMU takes time, and puzzling out the 4 pin wire diagram does too, if you aren't 100% confident you are interpreting the arrows properly like me.  Drilling the holes COULD go bad, but did not in my case.  If you screw up the drilling you could kill your board or at least make it need expert repair attention.  I agree with the others who have mentioned they thought this product would benefit from a clear, step-by-step installation procedure.

 

 

This is the entire procedure from the archived lotharek.pl page:

Quote
  • If Your chips are in sockets: 

    • Remove  MMU (20 pins) and OS ROM (28 pins) chips from their sockets 

    • Insert flat cable with "chip-adapter" side into MMU and OS ROM sockets ( RED STRIPE  cable indicates PIN 1 of removed chip)

    • Make proper 4wire connection of ULTIMATE with CPU  - CLICK 

    • Connect flat cables with "IDC-side" to ultimate board ( RED STRIPE cable indicates PIN 1 ultimate connector)

    • Fix ULTIMATE PCB inside Atari

  • If Your chips are not in sockets:

    • desolder MMU (20 pins) and OS ROM (28 pins) from atari pcb

    • Solder sokcets into atari pcb (sockets are not supplied by me)

    • Insert flat cable with "chip-adapter" side into MMU and OS ROM sockets ( RED STRIPE  cable indicates PIN 1 of removed chip)

    • Make a proper connection with supplied 4wire cable between ULTIMATE and  CPU  - CLICK 

    • Connect flat cables with "IDC-side" to ultimate board ( RED STRIPE cable indicates PIN 1 ultimate connector)

    • Fix ULTIMATE PCB inside Atari

It's not lying, that's what you have to do, but it reads more like an elevator speech you'd give someone when you were in a tearing hurry to not be there than an actual procedure.  I can't see getting my time down to 5 min any time soon - maybe a half hour, on the same system type?

 

In the end, it wasn't THAT bad, but I'm not sure I'd claim it was the easiest mod ever.

 

Oh, after all that, it powered up and worked first try.  Go team Atari!  :)

 

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I'm glad your install was successful. Congratulations!

 

As far as Lotharek's Lair being down, it must've been something temporary or something to do with your ISP or something. As luck would have it, I was on the site just an hour or so ago, checking into an old order, and I didn't have any issues. Just to make certain, I tried again before posting this. The site came up without a hitch. So, whatever it was that was going on seems to have corrected itself.

 

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My 800XL installation video has diagrams with labelled arrows pointing to the four vias. There is really no need to run around in circles looking for that information. Shortening the ribbon cables needs a pair of scissors, a jeweller's screwdriver and a desk vice, but the cable lengths are described in  the video too.

 

The five minute install described in Lotharek's perfunctory instructions will give you exactly what you typically end up with: board hanging off a screw, four wires soldered directly to the CPU legs, and a concertina of redundant ribbon cable. Even that will take significantly longer than five minutes, owing to the socketing work which may be necessary.

 

If you started with the video and actually watched it, though, you have the via locations to start with.

 

It usually takes me at least an hour to put U1MB in, including adding or replacing sockets, drilling, shortening cables, crimping, etc. Selling the thing on a 'five minute install' implies a pre-socketed machine and a naff looking installation.

 

As for a clear, step by step installation guide: as the videos show, you can take a horse to water, but you can't make it drink.

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5 hours ago, flashjazzcat said:

My 800XL installation video has diagrams with labelled arrows pointing to the four vias. There is really no need to run around in circles looking for that information. Shortening the ribbon cables needs a pair of scissors, a jeweller's screwdriver and a desk vice, but the cable lengths are described in  the video too.

Sorry dude, but not all of us do well with video.  You are correct that you show the vias in your video, briefly, but I do a lot better with something I can read and print and have on the workbench next to the system being worked on.  Or study while sitting in a comfy chair, not in the computer room.  Or maybe even make notes on.  I'm not sure if this is a personal preference thing or an old school thing - I just do far better with written material with pictures.

 

Like if I want to look again, or more closely, at one of your inset pictures, I have to scroll through the video to find the few seconds where it is on-screen, pause, and stare at it.  I suppose I could at that point grab the screen, save it as an image, crop it, and print it, but that just gets me to where I started with the picture I had.  So I still have to run around in circles, just different circles.  :)

 

So despite the cool video, which is indeed helpful because it shows how to do the things that would be hard to explain in print, I still would be far happier to use that as an optional supplement to a written procedure with pictures.  I've learned a lot from your videos, such as soldering and de-soldering techniques, but I'm sure the lessons I take away aren't always what you're trying to teach.

 

Clearly, that is NOT YOUR PROBLEM.  It's just my preference and I know I work best that way.

 

As for the ribbon cable thing, this is an example of the problem with video.  Even when you explain it, you describe the things one would need that you don't assume they will already have laying around or know.  I don't know what the connectors are called that need to be pressed onto the cable.  I don't know how to align them properly.  I'm not really sure how an electrical connection is made by the connector - maybe it has little needle pins inside?  A diagram and BOM would help me immensely here.  Again, not your problem, just trying to explain why I don't find video only tutorials totally satisfying.  I'm sure I can do a quick search and pull up the rest of the info I lack.  I'm guessing that you already have a stockpile of the needed connectors and have installed them many times, so those mundane details seem obvious to you and not in need of explanation.

 

Agree that if you follow Lotharek's perfunctory instructions you get what you deserve in the end.  :)  Still, starting with a checklist like that helps, it's just not sufficient.

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6 hours ago, bfollowell said:

As far as Lotharek's Lair being down, it must've been something temporary or something to do with your ISP or something. As luck would have it, I was on the site just an hour or so ago, checking into an old order, and I didn't have any issues. Just to make certain, I tried again before posting this. The site came up without a hitch. So, whatever it was that was going on seems to have corrected itself.

Now that's interesting.  I still can't get there.  Maybe some sort of routing or ISP issue between here and there?  I normally can.  Usually I get a different error if it's routing or connectivity...  The error I'm getting implies that the site is up but has certificate issues.  I'm tempted to blame Firefox updates, except it happens using Chrome as well, like so.

image.thumb.png.b6fe6bd68a5038cd2aa7d455fb186def.png

Can anyone in the Los Angeles area reach lotharek.pl?  I can't do anything about it either way, just curious.

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4 hours ago, mdivancic said:

For a cleaner installation use this 3D printed mount. 

I wish I had thought to check for something like that.  Thanks for the info.  If I end up loving the U1MB and get another, I'll try it with that next time.

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The site is working from the UK

 

Stick a ? at the end of the address, it flushes the cache..

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Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, Dr Memory said:

Clearly, that is NOT YOUR PROBLEM.  It's just my preference and I know I work best that way.

That's fine, but you came in hot putting "extensive user manual" in quote marks and giving the impression that the information you were looking for was nowhere to be found. Of course I meant to provide supplementary, illustrated written material as a companion to the video on my website, but that's just one of the things which never gets off the to-do list (largely since I'm primarily concerned with documenting the firmware I wrote for the thing). In point of fact, I prefer a written reference myself and I have had my own video freeze-framed for two days as I work on a pair of 800XL U1MB installations. I wonder to myself why I didn't simply screen-grab the video or hunt around for the original graphics, but whatever; it wasn't a massive headache to fire the video up.

1 hour ago, Dr Memory said:

As for the ribbon cable thing, this is an example of the problem with video.  Even when you explain it, you describe the things one would need that you don't assume they will already have laying around or know.

Well, while the video is supposed to be instructional, it's not aimed at someone who wants to get the device installed in five minutes. If a video is needed (or rather, written instructions) on how to shorten or build your own ribbon cables, I can produce something. Sure: I've filmed the process before, but it's doubtless buried in this or one of the other U1MB install videos.

 

The video is aimed at someone who wants to do a neat install, has the dexterity and tool ability to do so, and is prepared to research and learn how to do new things. YouTube's chapters feature is pretty good now; I keep meaning to go through older videos and add descriptive jump points.

 

Anyway: I take on board the comments regarding written instructions and even agree to a large extent, but when I wasn't actually asked by the vendor to produce installation guides in the first place (instead doing so off my own back since I was doing the work anyway), said videos then get opportunistically linked on the vendor's product page (without me asking for this to happen), and then people complain that the installation instructions aren't good enough, it is possible to end up in a double facepalm moment.

 

For reference: the grey connectors are called 'Harting' connectors and can be a little difficult to source. I do have some spares, but attempt to re-use the existing connectors in 100 per cent of cases. This requires the deft use of a jeweller's screwdriver and takes practice before you can get away with not breaking them. The IDC connectors at the other ends of the ribbon cables are pretty easy to source, meanwhile. They're not intended for re-use either, but you can get away with doing so if you're handy with a craft knife.

 

The initial U1MBs (produced by Candle O'Sin) shipped with bespoke ribbon cables tailored to the host machine and quite nicely documented on Candle's website (all of this material could have been reproduced and still up on the Internet in a centralised location, but it wasn't and it isn't). This required the customer to decide which model of machine they were going to install the board in before they ordered it, but did avoid all this cable hacking. I just happen to think Candle's original installation philosophy was spot on and a good reference for others, but many people prefer to go their own way and hacking up the ribbon cable, etc, is a risky proposition for many.

 

Anyway: the videos document my approach to installing stuff in customer machines, and if they inspire others to do a decent job, they served their purpose.

Edited by flashjazzcat
Typos
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***I just happen to think Candle's original installation philosophy was spot on and a good reference for others, but many people to prefer to go their own way and hacking up the ribbon cable, etc, is a risky proposition for many. ***

fully agree....

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1 hour ago, Mclaneinc said:

Stick a ? at the end of the address, it flushes the cache..

Tried that, no joy.  So maybe US -> lotharek routing issue.

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Posted (edited)
9 hours ago, Dr Memory said:

Drilling was a bit of an adventure, just because I've never tried to drill holes in a motherboard before, and one that I care about at that.  Dremel did the job just fine. 

No drilling needed (of any kind, whatsoever) to install U1MB and make it fully reversible... (at least on Rev.C MoBo, Hong-Kong, fully socketed)

 

Now, in the case that U1MB is not going out in the future (like my case), the shields will require precise-cutting (non-reversible) to open space for U1MB, as they should be installed back in place, for normal operation. That, of course, will push the work clearly longer than an hour... Another option is to partially dismantle the shields, store them again, but they will likely corrode in contact with your hands, and unfriendly storage conditions.

 

_1D38183-web.thumb.jpg.a9e64f26b51256403c529aedbb7aaf9b.jpg

 

_1D38184-web.thumb.jpg.db3dab745639043a1b74fc253729ecb8.jpg

 

_1D38186-web.thumb.jpg.c5a67dfb515e11339aee57d3c7e3c024.jpg

 

Edited by Faicuai

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1 hour ago, flashjazzcat said:

Anyway: the videos document my approach to installing stuff in customer machines, and if they inspire others to do a decent job, they served their purpose.

I agree fully.  I was just pointing out that for many of us, additional info is needed.  Really, this is the biggest difference between a video showing an example installation and a written procedure - it's great as far as it goes but does not and can not cover all situations.

 

Also, and this is the part that bugs me about the modern tendency to make a video and call it a day, I can't do a text search on a video nor print it for later study.  It's a lot harder to do research on points of confusion - can't just copy a sentence that puzzled me and put it in google, for example.

 

Still agree that it isn't your problem, not like you're being paid to do this.

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10 minutes ago, Faicuai said:
9 hours ago, Dr Memory said:

Drilling was a bit of an adventure, just because I've never tried to drill holes in a motherboard before, and one that I care about at that.  Dremel did the job just fine. 

No drilling needed (of any kind, whatsoever) to install U1MB and make it fully reversible... (at least on Rev.C MoBo, Hong-Kong, fully socketed)

 

Now, in the case that U1MB is not going out in the future (like my case), the shields will require precise-cutting (non-reversible) to open space for U1MB, as they should be installed back in place, for normal operation. That, of course, will push the work clearly longer than an hour... Another option is to partially dismantle the shields, store them again, but they will likely corrode in contact with your hands, and unfriendly storage conditions.

Interesting approach!  I never even thought of cutting the shield.  Unfortunately, my board is not fully socketed, so I'm not sure how well this would have gone for me, but I'll certainly consider it in the future.  It looks a lot cleaner than what I did.  I don't think I have any way to make precision cuts in metal like that though.  Thanks for sharing that.

 

I'm not concerned about it taking longer than an hour - I was just poking at the "5 minutes" thing in the original procedure.

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Well, I got my first ever YouTube payment the other week: £78 (which took a year to earn), so I guess I am being paid for it. :) Patreon is also open (thanks to the person who signed up with a monthly pledge already, BTW).

 

But yeah: if people want written instructions provided at the point of sale, this is a vendor problem. I am perfectly capable of producing such material if enlisted to do so, but the more I see of the vendor's installation philosophy, it appears completely divergent from how I like to do things anyway.

 

As for videos vs. written material: one literally CANNOT WIN here. I write a sixty page user manual, people ask for a video instead or say the documentation is too in-depth. I make dozens of videos and people want written material. :)

 

Anyway: I don't sell the product so any useful contributions should be regarded as bonus material. :D

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As I had guessed, there is good info out there on how to mod ribbon cables.  For example:

 

https://startingelectronics.org/articles/IDC-ribbon-cable/

 

According to the author of that page, these are a form of IDC connector, which is an Insulation-displacement Connector.

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Insulation-displacement_connector

 

There are many types - I've encountered other types of IDC cables in the past and didn't realize this was one of those.  It makes sense that SCSI and floppy cables would be in the same family, but I wouldn't have guessed DE-9s were.  Those are the 9-pin connectors most people erroneously call DB-9.  :)  I only learned that about a year ago, I called them that for years also!

 

Anyway, the first link explains how to make ribbon cables using the appropriate IDC connectors, and the video shows how exactly to line things up and such, from multiple views.  You can even see how the connector grabs the wires, which I was curious about.

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5 minutes ago, flashjazzcat said:

Well, I got my first ever YouTube payment the other week: £78 (which took a year to earn), so I guess I am being paid for it. :) Patreon is also open (thanks to the person who signed up with a monthly pledge already, BTW).

 

 

Good to hear, I hope you make a bit more money next time...

 

You video's are most welcome and a great source of info...And very funny...Love a bit of dry wit and sarcasm...

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Posted (edited)
31 minutes ago, Dr Memory said:

Tried that, no joy.  So maybe US -> lotharek routing issue.

 

No, I'm in southern Indiana, so it's clearly not a U.S. too Lotharek issue.

 

Do you happen to use any sort of VPN by chance? Try temporarily disabling it, then try Lotharek's Lair again, just too see.

Edited by bfollowell

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3 minutes ago, flashjazzcat said:

Well, I got my first ever YouTube payment the other week: £78 (which took a year to earn), so I guess I am being paid for it. :) Patreon is also open (thanks to the person who signed up with a monthly pledge already, BTW).

 

But yeah: if people want written instructions provided at the point of sale, this is a vendor problem. I am perfectly capable of producing such material if enlisted to do so, but the more I see of the vendor's installation philosophy, it appears completely divergent from how I like to do things anyway.

 

As for videos vs. written material: one literally CANNOT WIN here. I write a sixty page user manual, people ask for a video instead or say the documentation is too in-depth. I make dozens of videos and people want written material. :)

 

Anyway: I don't sell the product so any useful contributions should be regarded as bonus material. :D

Grats on getting a payment from YouTube finally!  You deserve it!

 

I agree with everything you said there.

 

I write a lot in my job, which used to be architecting, designing and sometimes developing non-trivial software but has evolved into more leadership, bureaucracy, and communication.  You can't satisfy everyone at once.  People seem to really like the stuff I write, but unfortunately that has caused them to demand more of that and less of the things I find interesting and fun.  The management and financial parts are just... not fun.

 

This born-again Atari hobby is often the most fun thing I get to do on any given day.  I'm trying to help pay that back by contributing when I think I can.  Maybe I should just start a blog instead of posting these long-form write-ups.

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Posted (edited)
16 minutes ago, bfollowell said:
46 minutes ago, Dr Memory said:

Tried that, no joy.  So maybe US -> lotharek routing issue.

 

No, I'm in southern Indiana, so it's clearly not a U.S. too Lotharek issue.

Ok, that's odd.

 

I tried to get there from a raspberry pi, just to try an entirely different platform and browser in case something is hosed on my PC.  I'm able to look it up.

 

nslookup lotharek.pl
Server:         208.67.222.222
Address:        208.67.222.222#53

Non-authoritative answer:
Name:   lotharek.pl
Address: 85.128.198.36

 

and traceroute to it.

 

 3  agg60.igwdcaew02h.socal.rr.com (24.30.172.221)  17.404 ms  18.329 ms  18.236 ms
 4  agg30.lsaicaev02r.socal.rr.com (72.129.17.152)  21.180 ms  21.350 ms  21.260 ms
 5  agg26.tustcaft01r.socal.rr.com (72.129.17.2)  22.217 ms  21.852 ms  24.327 ms
 6  ae-5-0.cr0.chi10.tbone.rr.com (66.109.6.202)  25.001 ms  22.514 ms bu-ether16.tustca4200w-bcr00.tbone.rr.com (66.109.6.64)  23.186 ms
 7  66.109.5.247 (66.109.5.247)  19.932 ms  16.482 ms  22.379 ms
 8  las-b24-link.ip.twelve99.net (62.115.156.224)  28.989 ms  29.750 ms  24.857 ms
 9  * cogent-ic352552-las-b24.ip.twelve99-cust.net (80.239.160.65)  22.834 ms *
10  be3271.ccr41.lax01.atlas.cogentco.com (154.54.42.101)  23.253 ms be3360.ccr42.lax01.atlas.cogentco.com (154.54.25.149)  26.156 ms be3271.ccr41.lax01.atlas.cogentco.com (154.54.42.101)  23.937 ms
11  be3176.ccr21.sjc01.atlas.cogentco.com (154.54.31.190)  36.201 ms  35.898 ms  35.794 ms
12  be3178.ccr21.sfo01.atlas.cogentco.com (154.54.43.69)  33.697 ms be3179.ccr22.sfo01.atlas.cogentco.com (154.54.43.149)  36.444 ms  28.318 ms
13  be3716.ccr22.sea02.atlas.cogentco.com (154.54.86.106)  52.396 ms  52.276 ms be3717.ccr21.sea02.atlas.cogentco.com (154.54.86.210)  50.788 ms
14  be2074.rcr21.b052488-1.sea02.atlas.cogentco.com (154.54.47.110)  54.432 ms  53.355 ms  54.208 ms
15  38.104.127.26 (38.104.127.26)  51.574 ms  58.989 ms  57.917 ms
16  sea1-fw1.net.nazwa.pl (85.128.133.150)  56.621 ms  56.312 ms  55.851 ms
17  sea1-a2.net.nazwa.pl (85.128.132.187)  56.460 ms sea1-a1.net.nazwa.pl (85.128.132.186)  56.183 ms  55.866 ms
18  shared-amp36.rev.nazwa.pl (85.128.198.36)  49.227 ms  54.726 ms  54.631 ms

 

(Personal addresses redacted)

 

I can even ping it!

 

64 bytes from shared-amp36.rev.nazwa.pl (85.128.198.36): icmp_seq=1 ttl=50 time=   49.3 ms
64 bytes from shared-amp36.rev.nazwa.pl (85.128.198.36): icmp_seq=2 ttl=50 time=   49.7 ms
64 bytes from shared-amp36.rev.nazwa.pl (85.128.198.36): icmp_seq=3 ttl=50 time=   49.1 ms
64 bytes from shared-amp36.rev.nazwa.pl (85.128.198.36): icmp_seq=4 ttl=50 time=   57.4 ms


etc.

 

but when I try to access it using Chromium, I get the same ERR_SSL_PROTOCOL_ERROR result.  So from here, it appears to be a config issue on their end, but if others can access it, then I dunno.  I even tried my lonely Mac Mini and my phone, which is not attached using wifi at this time.  Same results with slightly different error message text in all cases.

 

Safari says "Safari can't open the page "https://lotharek.pl" because Safari can't establish a secure connection to the server "lotharek.pl"".

 

Phone, which is currently using 4G and not wifi, says "This site can't provide a secure connection" and "lotharek.pl sent an invalid response ERR_SSL_PROTOCOL_ERROR".  So whatever this is, it isn't just my home ISP or my router.

Edited by Dr Memory
minor typos

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Posted (edited)

well a number of people have added exceptions to their advanced options list to get there in the past... so maybe they will never see his stuff is out of day or miss configured...

it's kind of like the ribbon cables and connectors he supplies... hit or miss :) To wiggle or thump is too much work, finger might get sore... maybe the same for web stuff and typing...       lol

Edited by _The Doctor__

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43 minutes ago, _The Doctor__ said:

well a number of people have added exceptions to their advanced options list to get there in the past... so maybe they will never see his stuff is out of day or miss configured...

it's kind of like the ribbon cables and connectors he supplies... hit or miss :) To wiggle or thump is too much work, finger might get sore... maybe the same for web stuff and typing...       lol

LOL!  Ya maybe.  I'm just concerned because I've been on his site in the past without issue.  I can still access Mathy's site, which has a .nl domain, and atari8.info, which I believe to be in Poland.  So it's not like I'm cut off from Europe or anything.

 

I'd be less concerned if I wasn't blocked on so many different platforms.  Wierd.

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Posted (edited)

You are reaching it... it's just throwing security errors... expired or missconfigs on certificates... that normally isn't on the users side. That's usually the servers side.

Just to be sure search up about keeping yours up to date, (usually windows updates this stuff all by itself) and go from there.

 

I know I have had to add exceptions for Lothareks and Bits of the Past- previously... so there you might have it.

Edited by _The Doctor__
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22 minutes ago, Dr Memory said:

LOL!  Ya maybe.  I'm just concerned because I've been on his site in the past without issue.  I can still access Mathy's site, which has a .nl domain, and atari8.info, which I believe to be in Poland.  So it's not like I'm cut off from Europe or anything.

 

I'd be less concerned if I wasn't blocked on so many different platforms.  Wierd.

I'm also getting the same SSL errors. I think it's missing the TLS server certificate, only CA chain is provided:

% openssl s_client -showcerts -connect lotharek.pl:443
[...]
Certificate chain
 0 s:/C=PL/CN=*.nazwa.pl/[email protected]
   i:/C=PL/O=Unizeto Technologies S.A./OU=Certum Certification Authority/CN=Certum Domain Validation CA SHA2
[...]
 1 s:/C=PL/O=Unizeto Technologies S.A./OU=Certum Certification Authority/CN=Certum Domain Validation CA SHA2
   i:/C=PL/O=Unizeto Technologies S.A./OU=Certum Certification Authority/CN=Certum Trusted Network CA
[...]
 2 s:/C=PL/O=Unizeto Technologies S.A./OU=Certum Certification Authority/CN=Certum Trusted Network CA
   i:/C=PL/O=Unizeto Sp. z o.o./CN=Certum CA
[...]
 3 s:/C=PL/O=Unizeto Sp. z o.o./CN=Certum CA
   i:/C=PL/O=Unizeto Sp. z o.o./CN=Certum CA
[...]
No client certificate CA names sent
[...]

 

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