Jump to content
HDTV1080P

There is a total of 8 ColecoVision compatible power supplies that well work with the 25CM Gold Plated ColecoVision compatible power cord

Recommended Posts

Posted (edited)

There is an estimated total of 8 ColecoVision power supplies that well work with the 25CM Gold Plated ColecoVision compatible 5 pin DIN power cable. However only a total of 4 out of the 8 power supplies have been verified to work. 3 of the 8 power supplies are out of production. Only 3 of the power supplies of the 8 are level VI complaint. Level VI is here! Are you Compliant? | Current Solutions

 

Power Supplies - External/Internal (Off-Board) | AC DC Desktop, Wall Adapters | DigiKey

 

Verified power supplies that well work with the $15.99 25CM Gold plated ColecoVision compatible power cord

 

(one) Mean Well GP25B13A-R1B (recommended for the average consumer and level VI complaint). Price $33.90 without the power cords.

 

(two) Mean Well GP25A13A-R1B (picture quality sometimes not as good as the GP25B13A-R1B, level VI complaint) Price $33.90 without the power cords.

 

(three) Mean Well GP50A13A-R1B (great picture quality but I do not recommend since one short between the 5 and 12 volt rail and the power supply needs to be tossed in the trash since poor quality short circuit protection, level VI complaint) Price $52.07 without the power cords.

 

(four) XP Power AEH45UM33 (super awesome power supply with outstanding short circuit protection). However, can only be offered to ColecoVision owners outside of the United States since not level VI complaint. I will soon be creating a thread on this XP Power brand power supply that I really like. Price $73.90 and around $85 delivered after taxes and shipping. No power cords included at those prices.

 

Four power supplies that in theory might work with the ColecoVision but have not been tested yet

 

(five) XP Power PCM50UT03. This is a medical grade power supply that is not level VI approved, therefore for International markets only. This power supply is on back order so waiting to receive it in order to test it. Price $101.85 without the cables.

 

(six) Mean Well P50A13A-R1B. This power supply has been discontinued by the manufacture, and replaced with the GP50A13A-R1B in order to meet the Feb 2016 DOE level VI requirements. I have no plans on testing this power supply since its not in production and one would need to hunt down a new or used one.   

 

(seven) Mean Well P25A13A-R1B. This power supply has been discontinued by the manufacture, and replaced with the GP25A13A-R1B in order to meet the Feb 2016 DOE level VI requirements. I have no plans on testing this power supply since its not in production and one would need to hunt down a new or used one.  

 

(eight) Mean Well P25B13A-R1B. This power supply has been discontinued by the manufacture, and replaced with the GP25B13A-R1B in order to meet the Feb 2016 DOE level VI requirements. I have no plans on testing this power supply since its not in production and one would need to hunt down a new or used one.

 

P7260022.JPG

P6100080.JPG

P6100101.JPG

P6100090.JPG

ColecoVision PS 10.JPG

ColecoVision PS 11.JPG

ColecoVision PS 13.JPG

ColecoVision PS 7.JPG

Edited by HDTV1080P

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

If some company would develop a level VI AC to AC desktop power supply with a 5 pin male DIN plug then this gold plated power cord could also be used with the TI-99 series computers, Spectravideo 318 and 328 computers, and the Blue Chip Commodore compatible disk drives. 

Edited by HDTV1080P

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

For all 8 of the power supplies mentioned, they should all work perfectly fine with the Expansion Module #3 ADAM computer. In fact, I have personally tested the first 4 power supplies on the list and there is no issue at all when using the Expansion module #3 ADAM computer memory console. However, to use the Digital Data Drive a dedicated ADAM wire harness is needed. However, there is a way to get the Digital Data Drive to work with a ColecoVision power supply as long as the power supply outputs a minimum of 28.5 watts of power without needing to own or make a special ADAM wire harness.

 

If one buys the following high-quality female connector without the nuts from China for $2.05 with free shipping. Then place a 16 gauge, 18 gauge, or 20 gauge jumper wire between pins 1 and 2 (zoom in on the 3rd picture to see jumper wire on pins 1 and 2). Then the Digital Data Drive well receive 12 volts DC from the ColecoVision power supply wire harness.  *** One should place the female connector in some type of plastic housing so they do not get electrocuted or create a fire hazard. For safety reasons turn the ColecoVision power off before plugging in or unplugging the female connector on the side of the ADAM memory console  ***

 

D-Sub 9pin Solderless Connectors DB9 RS232 Serial to Terminal Adapt DOECU_U.fd | eBay (CHOOSE THE FEMALE CONNECTOR WITHOUT THE NUTS FOR $2.05).

 

Also the better solution is to use an official ADAM wire harness. But the above method works. The ColecoVision power supply wire harness was never designed to power the Digital Data Drive so there is a little bit more video and audio screen noise when the Digital Data Drive goes into high speed. The noise is more visible on the Mean Well 28.5 watt power supply models, but a lot less visible on the Mean Well GP50A13-A-R1B and especially less visible on the XP Power AEH45UM33.

 

See the following pictures of the $2.05 female plug that allows one to use the Digital Data Drive on the Expansion Module #3 with these 8 power supplies on the list. Of course the standalone ADAM does not work with this solution and requires a dedicated wire harness.

 

 

P4240021.JPG

P4240027.JPG

P4240029.JPG

Edited by HDTV1080P

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

Official voltage numbers of some ColecoVision and ADAM power supplies when under a load  

 

The original ColecoVision and ADAM computer power supplies that were manufactured up until 1985, were all high quality regulated power supplies (most videogame and computer systems at the time were using low quality unregulated power supplies). All the modern ColecoVision and ADAM power supplies like Mean Well, XP Power, and any other power supply mentioned in this post are regulated power supplies.   

 

The ideal regulated power supply should supply the same voltage when there is no load and when under a load. For example, there are some regulated 12 volt DC power supplies that output up to 5 amps that have a no load voltage of 12.33 volts DC and when under a load a 12.09 DC voltage or a full load voltage of around 12 volts DC exactly. Whereas an unregulated 12 volts DC power supply would have a no-load voltage of 14.97 volts DC and when under a load, around 12.67 volts DC (or somewhere between 15 volts and 12 volts depending on the load). Regulated power supplies are better quality and more expensive when compared to unregulated power supplies. The problem is the ColecoVision, ADAM, and even modern Windows style computers need power supplies that have 3 or more voltages which makes it harder for the power supply to maintain a regulated output for all 3 voltages. The ColecoVision and ADAM use -5 volts DC, 5 volts DC, and 12 volts DC. When a 3 output power supply is under a load sometimes the voltage can go up for some voltages and down for others.

 

The picture of the $2.05 female plug adapter in the prior post allows one to measure the voltages going through the Expansion module #3 ADAM computer when under a load. A $2.05 male plug adapter with a special y-cable allows one to measure the voltages of the standalone ADAM computer when under a load. There is no need to take a videogame system or computer apart to measure voltages as long as one has the correct external adapters and equipment.   

 

(one) The original 80’s Coleco brand ADAM power supply voltages when under a load when connected to the ColecoVision and the Expansion module #3 ADAM: 11.65 volts DC, 4.99 volts DC, and -5.30 volts DC. However, when the Digital Data Drive is moving at high speed the following voltages were recorded: 11.56 volts DC, 4.91 volts DC, and -5.37 volts DC.

 

(two) The original 80’s Coleco Smartwriter ADAM printer with built in Coleco power supply when connected to the ColecoVision and the Expansion module #3 ADAM: 11.90 volts DC, 5.13 volts DC, and -5.10 volts DC. However, when the Digital Data Drive is moving at high speed the following voltages were recorded: 11.86 volts DC, 5.09 volts DC, and -5.14 volts DC.  

 

(three) Apollo 400 watt power supply when connected to the standalone ADAM computer: 11.95 volts DC, 4.69 volts DC, and -5.10 volts DC. However, when the Digital Data Drive is moving at high speed the following voltages were recorded: 11.84 volts DC, 4.62 volts DC, and -5.19 volts DC.

 

(four) Apollo 400 watt power supply when connected to the ColecoVision and the Expansion module #3 ADAM: 12.04 volts DC, 4.83 volts DC, and -4.92 volts DC. However, when the Digital Data Drive is moving at high speed the following voltages were recorded: 11.94 volts DC, 4.77 volts DC, and -5.0 volts DC.

 

(five) Smurf 550 watt ColecoVision power supply when connected to the ColecoVision and the Expansion Module #3 ADAM: No load voltage 12.87 volts DC, 5.48 volts DC, and -4.94 volts DC. When under a load 12.61 volts DC, 4.77 volts DC, and -5.23 volts DC. However, when the Digital Data Drive is moving at high speed the following voltages were recorded: 12.22 volts DC, 4.73 volts DC, and -5.30 volts DC.

 

(six) Averages of the two 28.5 watt Mean Well GP25B13A-R1B and GP25A13A-R1B power supplies when connected to the ColecoVision and the Expansion Module #3 ADAM computer: No load voltage 12.49 volts DC, 5.20 volts DC, and -4.99 volts DC. When under a load 12.81 volts DC, 4.52 volts DC, and -5.20 volts DC. However, when the Digital Data Drive is moving at high speed the following voltages were recorded: 12.02 volts DC, 4.51 volts DC, and -5.19 volts DC.

 

(seven) 46.5 watt Mean Well GP50A13A-R1B power supply when connected to the ColecoVision and the Expansion module #3 ADAM computer: No load voltage 12.18 volts DC, 5.18 volts DC, and -5.12 volts DC. When under a load 11.88 volts DC, 4.51 volts DC, and -6.73 volts DC. However, when the Digital Data Drive is moving at high speed the following voltages were recorded: 11.53 volts DC, 4.39 volts DC, and -7.20 volts DC.

 

(eight) 42 watt XP Power AEH45UM33 power supply when connected to the ColecoVision and the Expansion module #3 ADAM computer: No load voltage 11.90 volts DC, 5.16 volts DC, and -5.02 volts DC. When under a load 11.85 volts DC, 4.54 volts DC, and -5.14 volts DC. However, when the Digital Data Drive is moving at high speed the following voltages were recorded: 11.42 volts DC, 4.55 volts DC, and -5.17 volts DC.

 

Being around a half a volt (0.5) off plus or minus is no big deal. However there is a serious problem with the Mean Well GP50A13A-R1B with the voltage being off 2 volts when under a load. All other power supplies are around -5 volts DC, but the GP50A13A-R1B drops to -7.20 volts DC when under a load. While this GP50A13A-R1B has a good picture quality there are now two reasons why not to recommend the power supply. One reason is the poor quality short circuit protection, and the other reason is that it well not stay around -5 volts DC when under a load and drops down to around -7.20 volts DC. While the ColecoVision/ADAM can handle -7.20 volts DC (it wants -5 volts DC), all other power supplies offer around -5 volts DC when under a load. This is really unacceptable to have a power supply output -7.20 volts DC when it should be -5 volts DC. I am surprised this power supply is still on the market.      

Edited by HDTV1080P
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

XP Power PCM50UT03 works with the ColecoVision but the AEH45UM33 model is much better

 

I finally got my XP Power PCM50UT03 power supply in after several months of waiting for the special order to arrive. This power supply cost around $115 after shipping. I wanted the PCM50UT03 power supply to be better quality when compared to the XP Power AEH45UM33 for around $85 after shipping, but under real world testing that is not always the case with products on the market. Both the PCM50UT03 and AEH45UM33 look exactly the same on the outside in terms of the exact same plastic case and cable used. But the differences stops there since the PCM50UT03 was engineered differently to obtain worldwide medical approvals, which results in different circuit board and component designs. The LED power light is dimmer on the PCM50UT03 versus a much brighter LED light on the AEH45UM33. The PCM50UT03 weight is slightly heavier at 1 pound and 4.2 oz, versus 1 pound and 3.4 oz for the AEH45UM33. While I realize the XP Power supplies like the PCM50UT03 are mainly used outside the United States where power supplies with level VI energy efficiency are not required, I was disappointed that the PCM50UT03 lacks the UL listed certification as you can see from the attached picture (UL listed is optional in the United States). It does have other certifications like CE safety for Europe. The XP Power PCM50UT03 has worldwide medical approval certifications. However, the AEH45UM33 does have the UL listed certification along with CE, and GS certification. I am very disappointed to report that the $85 AEH45UM33 power supply is much better quality when compared to the PCM50UT03 sample that I purchased. To my surprise the PCM50UT03 did not have as good of picture quality when compared to the AEH45UM33 when connected to the ColecoVision. Also, in a big disappointment when I shorted the XP Power PCM50UT03 power supply, the -5 volt DC rail never recovered, so this model of power supply has poor quality short circuit protection just like the Mean Well GP50A13A-R1B. However at least the PCM50UT03 +5 volts DC and +12 volts DC rail continued to work and the power supply was at least partially useable. But the ColecoVision needs -5 volts DC to work unless one internally modifies the ColecoVision so that it works without -5 volts DC like one ColecoVision I got off EBAY a long time ago.

 

I then for around 60 minutes kept shorting the existing XP Power AEH45UM33 power supply that had already been shorted several hundreds of times in the past. The XP Power AEH45UM33 power supply is built like a tank and the power supply would not break. Therefore, for international customers the XP Power AEH45UM33 power supply is a perfect power supply to be used with ones ColecoVision/ADAM system since it offers the best picture quality and has perfect short circuit protection. However, the XP Power AEH45UM33 power supply since its not level VI energy efficient approved by the DOE, it cannot be sold in the United States for use with a consumer electronics device like the ColecoVision per the Department of Energy rules.

 

The most expensive flagship power supplies are sometimes not the best power supplies. For example, both the Mean Well GP50A13A-R1B and XP Power PCM50UT03 have poor quality short circuit protection. But the lower priced Mean Well GP25B13A-R1B and the lower priced XP Power AEH45UM33 have excellent quality short circuit protection. On some ColecoVision systems the XP Power AEH45UM33 has a better picture quality when compared to the Mean Well GP25B13A-R1B. However only the Mean Well is level VI approved for United States consumer use.

 

Therefore, if one lives outside the United States where level VI power supplies are not required the best ColecoVision power supply to use is the XP Power AEH45UM33. If one lives inside the United States where level VI power supplies are required since Feb 2016 per import laws then the Mean Well GP25B13A-R1B is the best power supply to use. Plus one needs to own the $15.99 25CM ColecoVision power cable to connect to each of the power supplies.

XP PCM50UT03.JPG

POWER SUPPLY (BOTTOM VIEW).jpg

Edited by HDTV1080P

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 4/24/2021 at 2:22 AM, HDTV1080P said:

 

P7260022.JPG

P6100080.JPG

P6100101.JPG

P6100090.JPG

ColecoVision PS 10.JPG

ColecoVision PS 11.JPG

ColecoVision PS 13.JPG

ColecoVision PS 7.JPG

I bought this power supply.

 

It kicks total [email protected]#$%ing ass. ColUSB gets way too hot for my liking.

 

This thing has been perfect. It's nice not worrying if today will be the day my original Coleco power supply gives out.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 4/25/2021 at 2:39 AM, HDTV1080P said:

Official voltage numbers of some ColecoVision and ADAM power supplies when under a load  

 

The original ColecoVision and ADAM computer power supplies that were manufactured up until 1985, were all high quality regulated power supplies (most videogame and computer systems at the time were using low quality unregulated power supplies). All the modern ColecoVision and ADAM power supplies like Mean Well, XP Power, and any other power supply mentioned in this post are regulated power supplies.   

 

The ideal regulated power supply should supply the same voltage when there is no load and when under a load. For example, there are some regulated 12 volt DC power supplies that output up to 5 amps that have a no load voltage of 12.33 volts DC and when under a load a 12.09 DC voltage or a full load voltage of around 12 volts DC exactly. Whereas an unregulated 12 volts DC power supply would have a no-load voltage of 14.97 volts DC and when under a load, around 12.67 volts DC (or somewhere between 15 volts and 12 volts depending on the load). Regulated power supplies are better quality and more expensive when compared to unregulated power supplies. The problem is the ColecoVision, ADAM, and even modern Windows style computers need power supplies that have 3 or more voltages which makes it harder for the power supply to maintain a regulated output for all 3 voltages. The ColecoVision and ADAM use -5 volts DC, 5 volts DC, and 12 volts DC. When a 3 output power supply is under a load sometimes the voltage can go up for some voltages and down for others.

 

The picture of the $2.05 female plug adapter in the prior post allows one to measure the voltages going through the Expansion module #3 ADAM computer when under a load. A $2.05 male plug adapter with a special y-cable allows one to measure the voltages of the standalone ADAM computer when under a load. There is no need to take a videogame system or computer apart to measure voltages as long as one has the correct external adapters and equipment.   

 

(one) The original 80’s Coleco brand ADAM power supply voltages when under a load when connected to the ColecoVision and the Expansion module #3 ADAM: 11.65 volts DC, 4.99 volts DC, and -5.30 volts DC. However, when the Digital Data Drive is moving at high speed the following voltages were recorded: 11.56 volts DC, 4.91 volts DC, and -5.37 volts DC.

 

(two) The original 80’s Coleco Smartwriter ADAM printer with built in Coleco power supply when connected to the ColecoVision and the Expansion module #3 ADAM: 11.90 volts DC, 5.13 volts DC, and -5.10 volts DC. However, when the Digital Data Drive is moving at high speed the following voltages were recorded: 11.86 volts DC, 5.09 volts DC, and -5.14 volts DC.  

 

(three) Apollo 400 watt power supply when connected to the standalone ADAM computer: 11.95 volts DC, 4.69 volts DC, and -5.10 volts DC. However, when the Digital Data Drive is moving at high speed the following voltages were recorded: 11.84 volts DC, 4.62 volts DC, and -5.19 volts DC.

 

(four) Apollo 400 watt power supply when connected to the ColecoVision and the Expansion module #3 ADAM: 12.04 volts DC, 4.83 volts DC, and -4.92 volts DC. However, when the Digital Data Drive is moving at high speed the following voltages were recorded: 11.94 volts DC, 4.77 volts DC, and -5.0 volts DC.

 

(five) Smurf 550 watt ColecoVision power supply when connected to the ColecoVision and the Expansion Module #3 ADAM: No load voltage 12.87 volts DC, 5.48 volts DC, and -4.94 volts DC. When under a load 12.61 volts DC, 4.77 volts DC, and -5.23 volts DC. However, when the Digital Data Drive is moving at high speed the following voltages were recorded: 12.22 volts DC, 4.73 volts DC, and -5.30 volts DC.

 

(six) Averages of the two 28.5 watt Mean Well GP25B13A-R1B and GP25A13A-R1B power supplies when connected to the ColecoVision and the Expansion Module #3 ADAM computer: No load voltage 12.49 volts DC, 5.20 volts DC, and -4.99 volts DC. When under a load 12.81 volts DC, 4.52 volts DC, and -5.20 volts DC. However, when the Digital Data Drive is moving at high speed the following voltages were recorded: 12.02 volts DC, 4.51 volts DC, and -5.19 volts DC.

 

(seven) 46.5 watt Mean Well GP50A13A-R1B power supply when connected to the ColecoVision and the Expansion module #3 ADAM computer: No load voltage 12.18 volts DC, 5.18 volts DC, and -5.12 volts DC. When under a load 11.88 volts DC, 4.51 volts DC, and -6.73 volts DC. However, when the Digital Data Drive is moving at high speed the following voltages were recorded: 11.53 volts DC, 4.39 volts DC, and -7.20 volts DC.

 

(eight) 42 watt XP Power AEH45UM33 power supply when connected to the ColecoVision and the Expansion module #3 ADAM computer: No load voltage 11.90 volts DC, 5.16 volts DC, and -5.02 volts DC. When under a load 11.85 volts DC, 4.54 volts DC, and -5.14 volts DC. However, when the Digital Data Drive is moving at high speed the following voltages were recorded: 11.42 volts DC, 4.55 volts DC, and -5.17 volts DC.

 

Being around a half a volt (0.5) off plus or minus is no big deal. However there is a serious problem with the Mean Well GP50A13A-R1B with the voltage being off 2 volts when under a load. All other power supplies are around -5 volts DC, but the GP50A13A-R1B drops to -7.20 volts DC when under a load. While this GP50A13A-R1B has a good picture quality there are now two reasons why not to recommend the power supply. One reason is the poor quality short circuit protection, and the other reason is that it well not stay around -5 volts DC when under a load and drops down to around -7.20 volts DC. While the ColecoVision/ADAM can handle -7.20 volts DC (it wants -5 volts DC), all other power supplies offer around -5 volts DC when under a load. This is really unacceptable to have a power supply output -7.20 volts DC when it should be -5 volts DC. I am surprised this power supply is still on the market.      

(nine) 500 Watt EVGA ATX power supply model number 100-W3-0500-K1 when connected to the ColecoVision and the Expansion module #3 ADAM computer (using special -5 volts DC add on module): No load voltage 12.20 volts DC, 5.16 volts DC, and -5.06 volts DC. When under a load 12.08 volts DC, 4.64 volts DC, and -5.15 volts DC. However when the Digital Data Drive is moving at high speed the following voltages were recorded 11.58 volts DC, 4.62 volts DC, and -5.20 volts DC.  

 

Here is the link to the thread that was created for the 500 Watt ColecoVision power supply using EVGA technology:

500 Watt Power Supply for The ColecoVision (New product released September 16th 2021) - ColecoVision / Adam - AtariAge Forums

Edited by HDTV1080P

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...