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Randomized Algorithms Deep Thoughts?

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I skimmed the text at https://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007/978-981-15-7533-4_8, abstract:

 

Quote

Randomised algorithms use a degree of randomness in their logic. Such algorithms provide a solution which may not always be optimal, but is often produced faster than a brute force process. This paper explores the two classes of randomised algorithms: Las Vegas and Monte Carlo. A Las Vegas algorithm always produces the correct result, but its running time is based on a random value. A Monte Carlo algorithm has a deterministic running time and produces an answer that has a probability of  ≥ 1/3 of being correct. By means of this paper, we develop algorithms that predict the winning probabilities of the betting options.... A comparative study for the algorithms has also been done.

 

and I was wondering if Óscar, Joe, Others with SkillsTM could comment on how those could be implemented on an Intellivision, ideally wrapped in an IntyBASIC call? 

 

Just some theoretical musing.

 

 

Thanks.

 

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Probably because it is the afternoon, but I cannot "see" a game where an algorithm of this type could be implemented, also I cannot remember a game where a Monte Carlo algorithm is used.

 

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Posted (edited)

One idea would be to write a game in which a supply chain is represented, and then use Monte Carlo to simulate its performance in face of varying conditions. 

It would not be the most exciting game, however...

 

(I would dig it, but that's because it's in my line of work :-)

Edited by cmadruga
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12 hours ago, cmadruga said:

One idea would be to write a game in which a supply chain is represented, and then use Monte Carlo to simulate its performance in face of varying conditions. 

It would not be the most exciting game, however...

 

(I would dig it, but that's because it's in my line of work :-)

I remember a learning game on the Apple IIc at school called Appletown.  Perhaps a beefed-up variation of Appletown could be built using Monte Carlo.

 

In Discrete Mathematics class, one of my computer projects was to write a Blackjack simulator that played 10,000 games (not nearly enough, I had to argue to the professor) and created a 3D chart showing whether it was better to hit or stand, given the point value of the displayed cards and how many Aces were in play.  Included in the simulator was the Dealer's rule to shuffle the deck/s (I forget how many decks were used; might have been 2) when the stack was below the 25% threshold.

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2 hours ago, Zendocon said:

I remember a learning game on the Apple IIc at school called Appletown.  Perhaps a beefed-up variation of Appletown could be built using Monte Carlo.

Interesting, didn't know that one.

Do you have a good link? I couldn't find much content, only Little Computer People references.

 

2 hours ago, Zendocon said:

In Discrete Mathematics class, one of my computer projects was to write a Blackjack simulator that played 10,000 games (not nearly enough, I had to argue to the professor) and created a 3D chart showing whether it was better to hit or stand, given the point value of the displayed cards and how many Aces were in play.  Included in the simulator was the Dealer's rule to shuffle the deck/s (I forget how many decks were used; might have been 2) when the stack was below the 25% threshold.

I suppose the number of runs needed depends on what you are simulating... To be honest I haven't seen a good rule of thumb for minimum # of runs, have you? 

The more, the merrier I suppose, but eventually there will be diminishing returns.

Of course, given that Monte Carlo is resource intensive, for sure that will limit what can be done in practical terms in a platform like the Intellivision.

 

 

 

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1 minute ago, cmadruga said:

Interesting, didn't know that one.

Do you have a good link? I couldn't find much content, only Little Computer People references.

I couldn't find anything just now.  Perhaps it was written by a math teacher and had very limited distribution.  It was all text-based and gave you so many tries to figure out what price to set for selling apples to get the maximum profit.  Nothing that couldn't be written in ECS BASIC.

2 minutes ago, cmadruga said:

I suppose the number of runs needed depends on what you are simulating... To be honest I haven't seen a good rule of thumb for minimum # of runs, have you? 

The more, the merrier I suppose, but eventually there will be diminishing returns.

Of course, given that Monte Carlo is resource intensive, for sure that will limit what can be done in practical terms in a platform like the Intellivision.

All I know is that I wanted to simulate a million hands of Blackjack, and the professor insisted I hard-code in a maximum of ten thousand.  When he looked at the final output, he pointed to specific cells and told me "that one is wrong, that one is wrong, that one is wrong."  That's when I stopped him and argued it would have taken a lot more than ten thousand hands to get accurate results.

 

Just because something isn't practical doesn't mean it shouldn't be done.  Things like that are always good to implement out of academic curiosity.  I still am waiting to see somebody implement Mandelbrot in Colored Squares Mode, just because.

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1 minute ago, Zendocon said:

I couldn't find anything just now.  Perhaps it was written by a math teacher and had very limited distribution.  It was all text-based and gave you so many tries to figure out what price to set for selling apples to get the maximum profit. 

Maybe it was a clone of Lemonade Stand?

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lemonade_Stand

 

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It was even more simplified than that.  All you did was set the price of apples.

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I can't confirm nor deny that Cmart's Noodle Stand will contain any form of Monte Carlo simulations or other forms of randomized algorithms. I can't even confirm nor deny that the game will be developed.

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Posted (edited)
8 hours ago, carlsson said:

I can't confirm nor deny that Cmart's Noodle Stand will contain any form of Monte Carlo simulations or other forms of randomized algorithms. I can't even confirm nor deny that the game will be developed.

I can confirm that I was not able to peek through a window to see what carlsson is developing.  Sweden's too far. :(

Edited by Kiwi

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