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ralphb

Sony PVM-20M2/4E and TI 99?

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I'm looking at buying a Sony CRT monitor, model PVM-20M4E or 20M2E.  As far as I can see, they both have component input (Y, R-Y, B-Y) for European models and composite inputs (Y/C) for US models.  (European TIs can also emit composite.)  They can do both PAL and NTSC.

 

Can someone confirm that these would work with the TI 99?

 

EDIT: Always confuse component and composite ... 🤪

 

EDIT: Is there a simply way to convert coax to BNC cable terminals?

 

EDIT: Sorry, another edit: Apparently Y/C refers to Super-Video and has two terminals, but the Sony only has one connector?!

Edited by ralphb

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20 minutes ago, ralphb said:

 European TIs can also emit composite.

 

Do you mean modding the PAL modulator or directly from the plug on the back of the TI?

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5 minutes ago, tmop69 said:

Do you mean modding the PAL modulator or directly from the plug on the back of the TI?

No, you have to "mod" the PAL modulator.  The signal is somewhere in that box, you just need to grab it from there.

 

I think there are instructions on how to do this on mainbyte.com.

Edited by ralphb
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1 hour ago, ralphb said:

Is there a simply way to convert coax to BNC cable terminals?

This is what I used on my Time-Base-Corrector...

 

bnc2rca.png.45be0f19146998717a676bcd1e607ceb.png

...You might mean something else though.:grin:

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8 minutes ago, HOME AUTOMATION said:

This is what I used on my Time-Base-Corrector......You might mean something else though.:grin:

No, that's what I mean.  I guess I'll just build new cables for that ...

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Better picture:

 

bnc2rcabetter.png.6c7f46bacfb4d8c0b0ec3506ea7d29f6.png

...they have these, to F connectors as well.

Here in the states 10 for about $8 on ebay.

 

Convenient, yet, still perhaps a waste of money!💎

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Is there a reason to buy a CRT ?   

 

or do connections to modern TV (with Composite, VGA and HDMI) also do?

 

If so, then you can:

1. US-Console (5 Din plug), make a direct cable to Composite (Yellow for TV,  Red/White for Audio), this works well

    (there are also standard cables)

 

2. European console (6 DIn plug)  make a cable directly to a TV that has Component (YPbPr)

    Or use any of the board of GBS8200 video converter (there are different versions, Green (VGA or 2x VGA) and a v4 and v5, Blue (HDMI),

    and there is a red board as well. These are very cheap, I have a few.  It is worth trying. 

    (I had lot of issues with these boards getting a stable signal with  the Geneve, but it seems with a TI-99/4A it works, colours are a bit washed out)

 

3. My TI-99/4as have F18A board built-in  (connects to  VGA connector).  Audio you need a separate cable (bought a few DIN-to 3.5mm audio)

 

4.  Also I bought the OSSC (Open Source Scan Converter) for the Geneve (because of 15 KHz signal), made a cable to SCART plug

     and then output is via HDMI (very sharp colours, and happy with this so far).

     I find this device worth it, comes with remote control and can tune a lot, but maybe too much for a TI-99/4A.

 

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21 minutes ago, globeron said:

Is there a reason to buy a CRT ?  [...]

Thanks for your suggestions!

 

I also have a TI 99 equipped with an F18A, which sits on my computer desk and is connected to my main (flatscreen) monitor.  I usually picture-in-picture its output with my desktop machine's screen.

 

But I also keep another TI 99 with PEB for entirely retro-related activities, and for that one I'd prefer a CRT monitor, because of authenticity. 🙂  My old Amiga monitor, beside going dark randomly, cannot deal with NTSC, and I'd like to be able to swap between my European black and aluminum console and my US beige one.

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There is something you can do on CRT TV's, which I think you cannot do on modern technology. 

 

I remember as a kid I wrote programs in BASIC, Extended Basic, Turbo Pascal 99, C99 and Assembler.

to change the screen color rapidly,  then you see those color bands appearing on the screen which does

not happen on LCDs/

 

Something like

 

10 CALL SCREEN(5)

20 CALL SCREEN(8)

30 GOTO 10

 

and similar for the other programming languages.

 

 

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And just reading Yesterday News Oct. 2021. 

 

I read somewhere this will also not work on modern technology  (as the sensor reads the light intensity of the CRT screen)

(would be interesting to know if there is a replacement for it for LCD screens with light sensors, the only game I know on Nintendo is Duck Hunt)

 

Not sure what was written for TI

 

image.thumb.png.c471e918dfbbb0687abcbf5037e3d742.png

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Nintendo's zapper worked by swapping out a frame while the trigger was down with the targets as white squares on a black background. LCD or plasma can't reproduce the timing precisely enough for the zapper to work properly. I don't know if the TI-compatible device you shared uses the exact same method, but I'd imagine it was similar.

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15 hours ago, globeron said:

the only game I know on Nintendo is Duck Hunt

Hogan's Alley

 

 

 

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13 hours ago, OLD CS1 said:

Hogan's Alley

 

Gumshoe was the best one - played the heck out of that one as it was an actual game, rather than just target practice. :)

 

 

 

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Hi Ralph, getting this monitor is a great idea.

I have one of these Sony BVMs, it directly takes the Y, R-Y, B-Y output by the TI-99 PAL 6 pin. There is no need for any TI Modulator or RGB modulator inbetween.

I also bought a NTSC slotin card to use it with the american TI-99s.

Back then I posted infos and many photos in this thread:

And I can only repeat, the pictures/video inside that thread don't do it justice.
It is simple spectacular.

 

The pros are simple: reference quality! scanlines! video/gaming is exactly like intended by the developers. Parsec never looked that good! The CRT gives the video, the sprites, even the text a very natural look, a distinct difference from seeing the same program running on a emulator, or having a NES mini (emulation) connected to your large lcd display. The quality of such CRT is beyond what you might be used from the arcades.

The cons: doesn't handle sound, heavy, size of monitor.


At the moment I don't have enough space to have this monitor regularly running as a monitor for my TI-99, I still aim for setting it up. Having such a Sony PVM/BVM would definately be the richest TI-99 video game experience you can get. Not sure, if you need it, if you are not into games, or if you are at the moment using the TI-99 for programming/office/management type of things.

 

Since I bought mine, the market prices increased a lot. There is a nice Facebook group on such devices, that I started in 2017.

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16 hours ago, kl99 said:

Hi Ralph, getting this monitor is a great idea.

Thanks, Klaus, that sounds great!  I'll keep an eye out for those Sonys, although I think I'll pass on the current offering, costing 750 Euros with delivery.

 

But can this monitor series deal with composite input?  The seller is not responding, and the manual I found is inconclusive.  NTSC and PAL are not a problem, though, at according to the description.

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There's no need to spend big bucks on PVMs. Decent consumer sets also offer very high quality image and cost either nothing or fraction of the price.

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4 minutes ago, youxia said:

There's no need to spend big bucks on PVMs. Decent consumer sets also offer very high quality image and cost either nothing or fraction of the price.

The issue is that they should support composite, which is quite common, but also both PAL and NTSC, which isn't.

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I see, that's a slightly different model than what I found, but yours looks even better. 🙂

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