Jump to content
chemistryguy

Power supply - Ain't broke, don't fix?

Recommended Posts

Hello everyone! I'm new here.

 

I finally have a space where I can pull out my old 800xl and 1050 drive to set up a retro computer area. With the exception of a few corrupted disks, everything is surprisingly in good order. 

 

I put things on hold until I get the replacement power cord for the 800xl. From what I understand, the "ingot" PSU I have is a potential MB killer. 

 

It seemed like a good idea to update the PSU for the other devices I have, including the 1050 drive. But after scouring the various forums, it sounds to me as if I should just let things be if they're working. Would everyone agree? Is it just the 5V power source that can potentially fry components?

 

Thanks in advance!

PXL_20220225_164310486.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, chemistryguy said:

It seemed like a good idea to update the PSU for the other devices I have, including the 1050 drive. But after scouring the various forums, it sounds to me as if I should just let things be if they're working. Would everyone agree? Is it just the 5V power source that can potentially fry components?

 

The power supply poses the greatest risk yes.  Generally the advice on these things will range from dont-do-anything to recap-everything, so take everything with a grain of salt.

 

I'd suggest replacing the original supplies with modern equivalents (Lotharek, etc) and visually inspecting your devices for capacitors that are leaky or exploding and replace those.

 

Oddly enough I just worked on a 1040STe last night replacing the power supply with a brand new one from Centurion Technologies.  I inspected all the caps in the STe and only found one that had visible signs of danger and replaced it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Appreciate the input.

 

I haven't disassembled the 800 yet. Hoping for the best, but yes, I'd like to know if the capacitors are leaking, but I've no experience soldering. Used to modern builds, so all of this makes me a bit anxious. Time to learn something new.

 

Cheers!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You don't need to replace the PSU for the 1050, it's a 9VAC PSU and has no active components

to go wrong excepting a fuse, just keep that and replace the 5V PSU' for the actual 800XL

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Cut off the DIN cord from the brick to keep, and throw out the rest. The old wire with the DIN connector is good to attach to a modern 5VDC PSU.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'd suggest: "ain't broke - don't use it anyway".

Edited by Peri Noid
  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I generally re use the cords from these, or gut them and put a real power supply inside...

some people who don't want the expense... I generally at least get them to use it with a crowbar/clamp to protect the computer on failure...

this brick will fail and kill your machine otherwise... tic tic tic tic toc tic toc booooom

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, tuf said:

I'd suggest replacing the original supplies with modern equivalents (Lotharek, etc) and visually inspecting your devices for capacitors that are leaky or exploding and replace those.

He's already got a +5VDC supply on order to replace the INGOT, his current question is about the 9VAC power supplies for the drives/other peripherals.

 

The Atari 9VAC power supplies are very reliable, the only common issue is a blown internal fuse, the fuse can be replaced but this is not easy. There is also a 9VAC 15.3VA power supply(part# C014319) that came with some early 400s(likely others) that is underpowered for most devices. I believe it would be fine with the 850 interface but wouldn't recommend it for the 400/800/1200XL or any of the Atari disk drives.

Edited by BillC
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
50 minutes ago, BillC said:

The Atari 9VAC power supplies are very reliable

They are so reliable, I use them for some of my synths! Beats the original power supplies ;)

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, chemistryguy said:

It seemed like a good idea to update the PSU for the other devices I have, including the 1050 drive. But after scouring the various forums, it sounds to me as if I should just let things be if they're working.

What these tend to fry, and as was true in my case... the ram chips.

 

So if they're socketed and you want to ignore the general advice, go ahead and roll the dice.

 

If the ram chips are soldered, play it safe and take the advice here...

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

To the OP, it won't hurt to undo the screws and take a look at the PCB, if any of the caps are suspect they will normally have a bulge at the top or just a mess underneath them. If there's a mess then get some IPA and perhaps a drop of white vinegar and wipe the mess off as it's corrosive as hell, make sure you get all the mess / IPA etc off..

 

Replacing Caps normally isn't that hard but if you unsure then get someone else to do it. If you fancy doing it then make sure you don't keep the iron on the trace too long (just enough to melt the old solder) and then use your choice of desolder tool. A little tip, add a little solder to the caps legs on the bottom of the PCB, it helps with the flow of the old solder when desoldering. When installing a new electrolytic capacitor make sure you get the orientation right, there's a line on one side pointing down to which leg is negative, so neg to neg, plus to plus. Some videos I've seen show people melting the solder on each leg and pulling the cap out, please please don't do that, these old boards have 40yr old tacks that can lift off the pcb very easily, do each leg on it's own.

 

Lastly, inspect your work, make sure no solder is anywhere but where it should been.

 

Remember, if unsure get a person with electronics know how.

 

Paul..

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
21 minutes ago, Mclaneinc said:

If you fancy doing it then make sure you don't keep the iron on the trace too long (just enough to melt the old solder) and then use your choice of desolder tool. A little tip, add a little solder to the caps legs on the bottom of the PCB, it helps with the flow of the old solder when desoldering.

As I don't have a decent de-soldering setup, just an old SolderPult :) which if your not careful

can damage track due to the violent nature of the device, I found De-soldering Wire

quite useful to get a load of excess solder off, usually it's enough to allow remove of the component.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A lot of folk don't like the braid, but it's got it's uses. As for me, I have braid, a pult like yourself and a very cheapy aliexpress desolder gun that I have not used yet (bet it's awful :) ) I'm just a hobby level soldering person, only do my own gear. (More for FJC to have :)  ).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, tuf said:

Found this in my STe tonight - replaced it and inspected the rest.

PXL_20220227_101204907.PORTRAIT.jpg

oh my... leaky, gooey, bulged wangs are not good. Clean wherever the wangs touched, as you don't want the damage to continue or spread.

  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...