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What Atari sales numbers do we have for their systems? (Research thread)


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#126 JaguarVision OFFLINE  

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Posted Thu Nov 2, 2017 4:26 PM

Double, see previous post.

Edited by JaguarVision, Thu Nov 2, 2017 4:30 PM.


#127 Flojomojo ONLINE  

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Posted Thu Nov 2, 2017 5:39 PM

These aren't hardware numbers, but I think the fact that there were only 59 licensed Atari 7800 games, while the Sega Master System has 341 games, counts for something. SMS had a "long tail" in Brazil, but both machines looked pretty well dead in the United States by the time the Genesis arrived on the scene.

A similar question to SMS vs 7800: who got more votes in the 2016 US Presidential election: Gary Johnson or Jill Stein?

Hey moderator: oh dear, this thread has veered into a political discussion! Best to lock it up tight.



#128 mr_me OFFLINE  

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Posted Fri Nov 3, 2017 7:47 AM

Maybe I missed it earlier but could you please cite a source for the 2 million.

...

Assuming the 2 million by 89 is true the 7800...

But that's ignoring the reported 2 million by 89.

 

... Thus by the time the 780/ peaked it likely be closing in fast on 2 million and then you would have European sales on top of that. Meeting the reported 2 million 7800's in 89.
 

 

 

 

2. Depending on what the real 7800 European release date is for the 7800, the 7800's 1 million by June 88 was near all or entirely all American sales. The rest of the year would see the 7800 peak going into 89.

From the internal Atari 7800 US sales reports you have approximately 72k consoles (1986), 396k (1987), and then a portion of the 1988 sales (approx 460k) lets say 195k.  That would total 670k.  You can count on Canada to be about 10% of the US making it approx 737k consoles, and then you have Mexico and the other ntsc countries in central and south America.  The rest of the world would have to come up with another 263k to reach 1 million. Maybe it wasn't yet available in Europe yet, doesn't matter.  Maybe the guy that wrote the press release was rounding up, heavily.  Either way the numbers are still in the ball park.

 

Note that if you were to count all unit sales (consoles and cartridges) from the Atari sales report it would be over 2M for the same time period (through May 1988).  So based on the Atari press release we know the Atari sales report is both consoles and cartridges.

 

 

 

...

1. We know the SMS 2 million was by end of life in 1992. Assuming Game over is valid. (I've also heard 1.5 million thrown around)

...

If you read the quote from the Game Over book it's not clear where the 2 million SMS sales are from.  You can use the 1.5M sales from the following newspaper article for SMS United States sales from 1986-1989.  By 1989, 7800 sales were insignificant according to the Atari sales report.

New-straits Times, Mar 22, 1990
https://news.google....a million&hl=en

 

 

5. We have a 1 million/nearly all 1 million number for the 7800 in 88. Along with them peaking during the end of the year. We have Zero SMS info at that time....

That would be 1M through May 1988.    There was a French magazine "Tilt" March 1988 (page 19), that has Sega claiming 500k SMS sales in the United States for 1987.  Those numbers are similar to 7800 sales from the Atari sales report for 1987 (approx 397k).  According to the Atari sales report, Atari 7800 US sales peaked in 1988 (approx 460k) and then dropped off in 1989 (approx 169k) and 1990 (approx 30k).   Sega could be rounding up for the magazine, where the Atari sales report would be more inline.  So, as I've said before sales are similar.

 

The French magazine also has Nintendo claiming 4M console sales in the US for 1987.  Both Sega and Nintendo had about a 6:1 cartridge/console ratio where the 7800 was less than 5:2.  It also has a total breakdown for 1987 United States sales as Nintendo 70%, Atari 16%, Sega 10%, and Intellivision 4%.
http://www.abandonwa...m=133&infos=oui


Edited by mr_me, Fri Nov 3, 2017 8:30 AM.


#129 Flojomojo ONLINE  

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Posted Fri Nov 3, 2017 9:52 AM

??

Intellivision had 4% of WHAT in 1987? Share of console sales? As the boa constrictor said to the elephant, I find that difficult to swallow. 

 

I think my election results analogy a few posts up wasn't the best. It would be more apt to compare 1988 results. The Atari 7800 and Sega Master System were Ron Paul and Lenora Fulani, but it's hard to say which was which. 



#130 Bill Loguidice OFFLINE  

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Posted Fri Nov 3, 2017 10:13 AM

??

Intellivision had 4% of WHAT in 1987? Share of console sales? As the boa constrictor said to the elephant, I find that difficult to swallow. 

 

It should at least be theoretically possible. It was at least available at all Toys R Us locations throughout the 80s. With that said, 4% does seem a bit high.



#131 mr_me OFFLINE  

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Posted Fri Nov 3, 2017 10:14 AM

I think that would be consoles and cartridges for home video games revenue (computers excluded) for the US market. For Intellivision, 1987 was a big year. INTV Corp released Tower of Doom, Commando, Dig Dug, Diner, Chip Shot, Slam Dunk, Slap Shot, and others, all in 1987. Intellivision still had a larger US install base than the 7800 and SMS combined.

And I think 2600 sales made up a good chunk of Atari's 16% share.

Edited by mr_me, Fri Nov 3, 2017 10:32 AM.

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#132 ubersaurus OFFLINE  

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Posted Fri Nov 3, 2017 11:25 AM

I want to point out (and forgot earlier) that Curt also posted the internal sales data for 7800 games in 86-90 - which I feel should also shut down the notion that the hardware sales document is including sales of both software and hardware (since clearly Atari counted them in separate files):

http://atariage.com/...-figures-86-90/

 

He also posted 5200 sales data from 86-90: http://atariage.com/...00-sales-86-90/

 

2600 games 86-90: http://atariage.com/...00-sales-86-90/

 

I could absolutely buy the Intellivision having a small portion of the home console market in 87. If there's one thing I've taken a way from researching the mid-80s it's that there was a strong appetite for video games still, and it was one that legacy systems still on the market like the Intellivision and 2600 (and Coleco, up into 85) were able to take advantage of at a low price range.


Edited by ubersaurus, Fri Nov 3, 2017 11:26 AM.


#133 mr_me OFFLINE  

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Posted Fri Nov 3, 2017 12:42 PM

I want to point out (and forgot earlier) that Curt also posted the internal sales data for 7800 games in 86-90 - which I feel should also shut down the notion that the hardware sales document is including sales of both software and hardware (since clearly Atari counted them in separate files):
http://atariage.com/...-figures-86-90/
...

Have you looked at these sales report files? The way the sales reports work is you specify part numbers to include in the report. You could include cartridges, consoles, or both. Those reports don't show what part numbers are included; maybe Curt has that file somewhere. At first, I thought it was a console sales report, until I actually looked at what's in the files. It looks like cartridges and consoles; someone would have to show me otherwise.

#134 ubersaurus OFFLINE  

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Posted Fri Nov 3, 2017 12:59 PM

Have you looked at these sales report files? The way the sales reports work is you specify part numbers to include in the report. You could include cartridges, consoles, or both. Those reports don't show what part numbers are included; maybe Curt has that file somewhere. At first, I thought it was a console sales report, until I actually looked at what's in the files. It looks like cartridges and consoles; someone would have to show me otherwise.

Yes, I have. The 7800 software sales document not only has "software" at the very top, but also notes specific CX part numbers for each game. The 7800 hardware file doesn't list any specific numbers, only how many units were being sent out to different vendors/reviewers/etc.

 

Atari sold about 201,000 7800 games in 1986, for example. The internal hardware sales are listed as 286,000 units, approximately, for 1986. Can you seriously claim that Atari only got 85,000 7800s out the door and into stores in 1986 but still sold 201,000 games? That's a hell of an attach rate, if so.


Edited by ubersaurus, Fri Nov 3, 2017 1:00 PM.


#135 mr_me OFFLINE  

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Posted Fri Nov 3, 2017 1:54 PM

Thanks, I haven't seen the cartridge report before.  All you have to do now is subtract the numbers from the cartridge report from the combined report to get precise console sales.  What's interesting is that the cartridge report is very close to what I calculated.

 

actual/calculated

1986     201,749   215,014

1987     908,905   916,681

1988  1,008,233   964,301  

1989     474,057   486,374

1990       62,196     64,749

 

total units - cartridge units = actual consoles sold

1986      286,417      201,749       84,668
1987   1,313,561      908,905     404,656
1988   1,423,923   1,008,233     415,690
1989      655,353      474,057     181,296
1990        93,443        62,196       31,247
   
Total   3,772,697    2,655,140  1,117,557  

 

So a total of 1.117 million Atari 7800 consoles were sold between 1986 and 1990.  Keep in mind that these are Atari sales to stores/distributors not to end users.  The 5:2 cartridge to console ratio is low compared to the 6:1 ratio that Nintendo and Sega had.

 

edit:

combined Atari 7800 cartridge and console sales report:

http://atariage.com/...gures-attached/


Edited by mr_me, Fri Nov 3, 2017 2:05 PM.


#136 cvga OFFLINE  

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Posted Fri Nov 3, 2017 4:48 PM

Can you seriously claim that Atari only got 85,000 7800s out the door and into stores in 1986 but still sold 201,000 games? That's a hell of an attach rate, if so.

 

Selling a little more than 2 cartridges per system when it was brand new doesn't seem unreasonable to me. It seems much more likely than selling less than 1 cart per system.
 

 



#137 cvga OFFLINE  

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Posted Fri Nov 3, 2017 5:02 PM

I saw a Toys R Us Christmas Ad from 1987. The ad had the following systems and prices in it...

 

NES $79.97 (base unit)

SMS $99.99

Intellivision III $69.99

2600 Jr. $49.99

 

They didn't even include the 7800.

 

I also looked up information from wishbookweb.com. I thought we might be able to get a glimpse of how well systems sold by how quickly the prices dropped. Unfortunately, the data is a little spotty but here's what they had...

 

1988 Sears Wishbook

 SMS $109.99

 NES $99.99

 7800 $89.99

 2600 $49.99

 

1989 Sears Wishbook

  Genesis $189.99

  NES w/ Power Pad $149.99

  NES (base) $99.99

  SMS $99.44

  Gameboy $89.47

  7800 $59.97

  2600  $39.99

 

1990 JC Penney Christmas

  Genesis $189.99

  Atari Lynx $169.99

  Gameboy $89.99

  NES (base) $99.99

 

1991 Sears Wishbook

  SNES $199.95

  Genesis $149.99

  Game Gear $149.99

  TG 16 $99.99

  Atari Lynx $99.99

  Gameboy $89.99

  NES (base) $89.95

  SMS $49.99



#138 Black_Tiger OFFLINE  

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Posted Sat Nov 4, 2017 5:50 PM

In North America, the SMS continued to receive new games after the Genesis launch, including what were essentially ports of Genesis games, even if those games themselves were ports.

I remember the Sears "Wish Book" edition of the seasonal catalog featuring Ultima IV enough that there was at least one screen shot that made the game very attractive and my Brother and I desperately wanting to play it. It is supposed to have been released in 1990, but Canada might have received it some time after it debuted in Europe.

During a trip to Seattle in 1993, my Brother and I were excited to find a healthy selection of SMS games at a major chain (Circuit City or Compucentre?). He bought GnG and Golden Axe Warrior, while I chose Vasteel over Exile, since they were both U.S. exclusives.


My family continued to buy Intellivision games through mail order catalogs after the NES was already established. I remember looking through one of them while my Dad was choosing what would be our last Intellivision game to order. I saw all of the NES games available and asked him if we could just get an NES instead, since it was clear by that point that a major console generation had transitioned and that we were having to pick Intellivision games based on titles alone. We were playing an Intv III that we bought after our Master Component died. So my family alone bought two hardware units and a bunch of games.

#139 JaguarVision OFFLINE  

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Posted Sun Nov 5, 2017 12:49 PM

Maybe I missed it earlier but could you please cite a source for the 2 million.

 

 

From the internal Atari 7800 US sales reports you have approximately 72k consoles (1986), 396k (1987), and then a portion of the 1988 sales (approx 460k) lets say 195k.  That would total 670k.  You can count on Canada to be about 10% of the US making it approx 737k consoles, and then you have Mexico and the other ntsc countries in central and south America.  The rest of the world would have to come up with another 263k to reach 1 million. Maybe it wasn't yet available in Europe yet, doesn't matter.  Maybe the guy that wrote the press release was rounding up, heavily.  Either way the numbers are still in the ball park.

 

Note that if you were to count all unit sales (consoles and cartridges) from the Atari sales report it would be over 2M for the same time period (through May 1988).  So based on the Atari press release we know the Atari sales report is both consoles and cartridges.

 

 

If you read the quote from the Game Over book it's not clear where the 2 million SMS sales are from.  You can use the 1.5M sales from the following newspaper article for SMS United States sales from 1986-1989.  By 1989, 7800 sales were insignificant according to the Atari sales report.

New-straits Times, Mar 22, 1990
https://news.google....a million&hl=en

 

That would be 1M through May 1988.    There was a French magazine "Tilt" March 1988 (page 19), that has Sega claiming 500k SMS sales in the United States for 1987.  Those numbers are similar to 7800 sales from the Atari sales report for 1987 (approx 397k).  According to the Atari sales report, Atari 7800 US sales peaked in 1988 (approx 460k) and then dropped off in 1989 (approx 169k) and 1990 (approx 30k).   Sega could be rounding up for the magazine, where the Atari sales report would be more inline.  So, as I've said before sales are similar.

 

The French magazine also has Nintendo claiming 4M console sales in the US for 1987.  Both Sega and Nintendo had about a 6:1 cartridge/console ratio where the 7800 was less than 5:2.  It also has a total breakdown for 1987 United States sales as Nintendo 70%, Atari 16%, Sega 10%, and Intellivision 4%.
http://www.abandonwa...m=133&infos=oui

 

 

Similar also proves my point I said either the 7800 were ahead or they were near.

 

issue is we have an Atari article from new library where they directly said they sold 100k in 86.

 

So I'm not sure if any of the "atari sales report" numbers are accurate. You could say they rounded up, issue is they literally produced around just that number, and they had issues bringing in more stock.

 

Also you are right, we don't know exactly where the 2 million comes form with the SMS. But we do know we have 1 million/around 1 million in 1988 in may as you said.  But we don't for the SMS outside that 500,000 you were talking about in 87. And despite what you say releasing in europe does matter because if it didin't by that time all that 1 million would be in america.

 

Another thing to consider is that the 7800 peaked in sales the end of 88 going into early 89, while the SMS doesn't appear to have done the same thing. I really don't see the SMS closing the gap. Especially if the Ace/Compute report of 2 million in 89 is true. But at best I think both of those would likely be tied.

 

BTW I find it funny that if you use books for Non-japenese consoles the wikipedia video game hierarchy will come after you for original research and lack of reliable sources but will gladly slap 2 million for the SMS from game over.

 

 

Thanks, I haven't seen the cartridge report before.  All you have to do now is subtract the numbers from the cartridge report from the combined report to get precise console sales.  What's interesting is that the cartridge report is very close to what I calculated.

 

actual/calculated

1986     201,749   215,014

1987     908,905   916,681

1988  1,008,233   964,301  

1989     474,057   486,374

1990       62,196     64,749

 

total units - cartridge units = actual consoles sold

1986      286,417      201,749       84,668
1987   1,313,561      908,905     404,656
1988   1,423,923   1,008,233     415,690
1989      655,353      474,057     181,296
1990        93,443        62,196       31,247
   
Total   3,772,697    2,655,140  1,117,557  

 

So a total of 1.117 million Atari 7800 consoles were sold between 1986 and 1990.  Keep in mind that these are Atari sales to stores/distributors not to end users.  The 5:2 cartridge to console ratio is low compared to the 6:1 ratio that Nintendo and Sega had.

 

edit:

combined Atari 7800 cartridge and console sales report:

http://atariage.com/...gures-attached/

 

of course we are assuming these numbers are accurate and have no error. This would also imply that the Atari 7800 sold less than 120k from may 88 till 1990 which makes zero sense given the boost the 7800 would get for the rest of 88.

 

 

??

Intellivision had 4% of WHAT in 1987? Share of console sales? As the boa constrictor said to the elephant, I find that difficult to swallow. 

 

 

I mean the Intellivsion II was like $19.99 in 1987 and the games were like $1-$3 each and was all over Toys R us stores and this ancient company called some kind of Radio Shack. Heard they went extinct recently. Hard to believe it but they used to be big.

 

 

I think that would be consoles and cartridges for home video games revenue (computers excluded) for the US market. For Intellivision, 1987 was a big year. INTV Corp released Tower of Doom, Commando, Dig Dug, Diner, Chip Shot, Slam Dunk, Slap Shot, and others, all in 1987. Intellivision still had a larger US install base than the 7800 and SMS combined.

And I think 2600 sales made up a good chunk of Atari's 16% share.

 

Hmmm by 87 I think the sales of the 2600 were starting to hit that wall. 85-87 was probably when that 25 turned close to thirty and it inched over the 30 million line by the time it was cut in 92.

 

 

 

 

I could absolutely buy the Intellivision having a small portion of the home console market in 87. If there's one thing I've taken a way from researching the mid-80s it's that there was a strong appetite for video games still, and it was one that legacy systems still on the market like the Intellivision and 2600 (and Coleco, up into 85) were able to take advantage of at a low price range.

 

Well yeah it was not a market crash just a industry one and even that was quickly recovered. 1985, the year that all the wiki revisionists say no one brought games and they were dead, saw 1+ million Atari 2600 sales with no advertising, 200,000+ Coleco sales (before discontinuation), and about the same for Intellvision.



#140 mr_me OFFLINE  

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Posted Sun Nov 5, 2017 2:52 PM

...

 

Another thing to consider is that the 7800 peaked in sales the end of 88 going into early 89, while the SMS doesn't appear to have done the same thing. I really don't see the SMS closing the gap. Especially if the Ace/Compute report of 2 million in 89 is true. But at best I think both of those would likely be tied.

....

What Ace/Compute report of 2 million?  Do you have a date, issue, year/month? 

 

 

...

issue is we have an Atari article from new library where they directly said they sold 100k in 86.

 

So I'm not sure if any of the "atari sales report" numbers are accurate. You could say they rounded up, issue is they literally produced around just that number, and they had issues bringing in more stock.

 

Also you are right, we don't know exactly where the 2 million comes form with the SMS. But we do know we have 1 million/around 1 million in 1988 in may as you said.  But we don't for the SMS outside that 500,000 you were talking about in 87. And despite what you say releasing in europe does matter because if it didin't by that time all that 1 million would be in america.

...

What's the problem with 100k in 1986?

 

Actually the numbers I posted do not include any returns.  Returns are relatively small anyway, except for 1990.  So the Atari 7800 United States console sales numbers are actually a little lower than what I posted.

 

Don't forget the 1.5M SMS sales in the United States from this newspaper article. ( https://news.google....a million&hl=en ) [Another thing we haven't considered is that more than twice as many SMS cartridges were sold over 7800 cartridges]

 

Without Europe and Pal sales, and unless the numbers specify United States sales only, the numbers can include Canada, Mexico, Central America, and the ntsc countries in South America.  Granted, it is still mostly United Stated but the other countries are not completely irrelevant.

 

 

of course we are assuming these numbers are accurate and have no error. This would also imply that the Atari 7800 sold less than 120k from may 88 till 1990 which makes zero sense given the boost the 7800 would get for the rest of 88.

No, what it implies is that companies tend to exaggerate or round up numbers they report to media or publish in press releases; which is not hard to believe.  What would be hard to believe is if companies would report numbers smaller than what they actually sold; which is what you would have to believe if you think that the combined Atari sales report is consoles only.  Most of the 416k sales in 1988 could likely have been at Christmas time; but it's impossible to say for sure. 

 

 

I mean the Intellivsion II was like $19.99 in 1987 and the games were like $1-$3 each and was all over Toys R us stores and this ancient company called some kind of Radio Shack. Heard they went extinct recently. Hard to believe it but they used to be big.

CVGA just wrote that he found a 1987 Toys R Us Christmas advertisement with Intellivisions for $69.99.  Intellivision II sold out in 1984/85 which is when they started making the new black and silver Intellivisions.  In 1987 new Intellivision cartridge releases were selling for $19.95; some older cartridges were selling as low $6.95 through direct mail order. 

( http://www.intellivi...u_Catalogos.htm)  I remember buying a $20 Intellivision cartridge from Toys R Us in the later 1980's, later I found $10 cartridges in other stores.  I wish I had seen Intellivision cartridges on clearance for $1 but none of that happened where I lived.  Stores seemed to just pull them off the shelves, like they were never there.  No doubt, I'm sure Intellivisions sold for $19.99 and cartridges for $3 somewhere, likely in 1984.  [In Canada, Radio Shack became "The Source" and they still have stores here.]


Edited by mr_me, Sun Nov 5, 2017 3:00 PM.


#141 JaguarVision OFFLINE  

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Posted Tue Nov 7, 2017 7:15 PM

What Ace/Compute report of 2 million?  Do you have a date, issue, year/month? 
 
What's the problem with 100k in 1986?
 
Actually the numbers I posted do not include any returns.  Returns are relatively small anyway, except for 1990.  So the Atari 7800 United States console sales numbers are actually a little lower than what I posted.
 
Don't forget the 1.5M SMS sales in the United States from this newspaper article. ( https://news.google....a million&hl=en ) [Another thing we haven't considered is that more than twice as many SMS cartridges were sold over 7800 cartridges]
 
Without Europe and Pal sales, and unless the numbers specify United States sales only, the numbers can include Canada, Mexico, Central America, and the ntsc countries in South America.  Granted, it is still mostly United Stated but the other countries are not completely irrelevant.
 
No, what it implies is that companies tend to exaggerate or round up numbers they report to media or publish in press releases; which is not hard to believe.  What would be hard to believe is if companies would report numbers smaller than what they actually sold; which is what you would have to believe if you think that the combined Atari sales report is consoles only.  Most of the 416k sales in 1988 could likely have been at Christmas time; but it's impossible to say for sure. 
 
CVGA just wrote that he found a 1987 Toys R Us Christmas advertisement with Intellivisions for $69.99.  Intellivision II sold out in 1984/85 which is when they started making the new black and silver Intellivisions.  In 1987 new Intellivision cartridge releases were selling for $19.95; some older cartridges were selling as low $6.95 through direct mail order. 
( http://www.intellivi...u_Catalogos.htm)  I remember buying a $20 Intellivision cartridge from Toys R Us in the later 1980's, later I found $10 cartridges in other stores.  I wish I had seen Intellivision cartridges on clearance for $1 but none of that happened where I lived.  Stores seemed to just pull them off the shelves, like they were never there.  No doubt, I'm sure Intellivisions sold for $19.99 and cartridges for $3 somewhere, likely in 1984.  [In Canada, Radio Shack became "The Source" and they still have stores here.]

No idea why people keep bringing up cartridge sales when the primary selling point of the 7800 was BC plus it didn't have many games.

Imean your own newspaper link is from 1990 2 years after the 7800 sold 1 million units in 88(before holidays). The 1.5 million SMS you have there by 1990 basically continues to show it makes less and less sense to believe the SMS was ahead.

Let's say holidays put Atari at 1.5 by Jan 1989. The 1.5 million for SMS in 1990 would be much later.

So let's say the 2 million SMS is real, the only way the SMS could be ahead is if Atari crashed and couldn't sell 500k+ consoles in 4 years. Which doesn't make sense.

Include the fact it took the SMS around 2 years afterward to reach Ataris old sales AND the SMS was in decline in 1991?

Edited by JaguarVision, Tue Nov 7, 2017 7:20 PM.


#142 Black_Tiger OFFLINE  

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Posted Tue Nov 7, 2017 7:27 PM

The 7800's selling point being backwards compatibilty and the library being limited and full of games which were already on 5200 and 2600... while the SMS had a much larger library full of exclusives and the Genesis having backwards compatibility through the PBC...

-it's a no-brainer that the SMS was more successful.

#143 Bill Loguidice OFFLINE  

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Posted Tue Nov 7, 2017 7:32 PM

Frankly, mr-me's analysis is pretty rock solid. The 7800 likely sold only a little over 1 million total consoles from 1986 – 1990. That makes a heck of a lot more sense given the various factors involved than it selling millions more. Again, numbers and sources matter. At this point, it's up to someone to dispute mr-me's analysis in a similarly substantive way. 



#144 ubersaurus OFFLINE  

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Posted Wed Nov 8, 2017 9:36 AM

I did have a bit of a brain fart comparing the overall sales and the cart sales when I turned up those files, heh - I do think it adds a lot of credence to his analysis after being quite wary of his initial claims. Would be nice to have the 1991 numbers too, but I can't imagine it's more than 10-20,000 7800 console units sold.

 

I'd also love to see any hardware sales numbers from Atari Corp on the other platforms, but I don't think Curt's posted any if he's got em.



#145 JaguarVision OFFLINE  

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Posted Fri Nov 10, 2017 9:08 AM

Frankly, mr-me's analysis is pretty rock solid. The 7800 likely sold only a little over 1 million total consoles from 1986 1990. That makes a heck of a lot more sense given the various factors involved than it selling millions more. Again, numbers and sources matter. At this point, it's up to someone to dispute mr-me's analysis in a similarly substantive way. 


We got 1 million in 88 fro Atari themselves, what are you talking about? And it took the SMS two years later to reach 1.5

#146 davidcalgary29 OFFLINE  

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Posted Fri Jan 19, 2018 4:05 PM

The Lynx had only sold 20,000 units in Japan by mid-91 according to Lawrence Siegel in the July 91 issue of Atari Magazine (France).



#147 save2600 OFFLINE  

save2600

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Posted Fri Jan 19, 2018 4:42 PM

Seeing all the sales comparisons, I wonder how many Dina systems Telegames sold during its "lifespan"? I know I bought one in the very late 80's/early 90's, but felt it was a piece of junk and returned it to them for a refund. lol

All those unsold game cartridges for the Colecovision, but no more systems to sell with them. Enter the Dina... :rolling:

#148 Bill Loguidice OFFLINE  

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Posted Sun Jan 21, 2018 8:46 AM

Seeing all the sales comparisons, I wonder how many Dina systems Telegames sold during its "lifespan"? I know I bought one in the very late 80's/early 90's, but felt it was a piece of junk and returned it to them for a refund. lol

All those unsold game cartridges for the Colecovision, but no more systems to sell with them. Enter the Dina... :rolling:

 

I would think no more than a few tens of thousands of Dina systems at best, and maybe even no more than 10,000. Their scarcity today I think is a good indicator. It was never going to sell much despite their best efforts in their catalog to show how it was "superior" to contemporary systems like the NES in a handy comparison chart.

 

I had one as part of my collection for a while. It had a few major drawbacks including having to tune to a weird channel over its RF output because it didn't use the North American standard. It's my understanding that some models had the SG-1000 cartridge slot disabled, but I know on mine it worked. That was never advertised as a feature of it, although I doubt it would have moved many more units. I don't recall Telegames carrying any SG-1000 stuff, but it's been a long time.



#149 Flojomojo ONLINE  

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Posted Sun Jan 21, 2018 10:17 AM

despite their best efforts in their catalog to show how it was "superior" to contemporary systems like the NES in a handy comparison chart.

I remember that chart, but not enough to re-create it from memory. Did anyone keep a copy of it? Can't find it on wayback. It was truly hilarious, on par with "Retro VGS's" comparison matrix with current systems for bad ideas. 

 

I never saw the retail box before ... just discovered this while searching for their marketing material. It almost looks like an AtGames Flashback product. http://www.colecovis...nsole/dina.html



#150 Bill Loguidice OFFLINE  

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Posted Mon Jan 22, 2018 9:56 AM

I remember that chart, but not enough to re-create it from memory. Did anyone keep a copy of it? Can't find it on wayback. It was truly hilarious, on par with "Retro VGS's" comparison matrix with current systems for bad ideas. 

 

I never saw the retail box before ... just discovered this while searching for their marketing material. It almost looks like an AtGames Flashback product. http://www.colecovis...nsole/dina.html

 

Mine had the box too. It was definitely that cheap Asian knock-off look, much rougher than the recent AtGames releases. 

 

The one I had had no power brick with it. If I recall correctly, I used the one from my Votrax speech synthesizer to make it work. Clearly the box can't accommodate a power brick, so it must have been supplied outside the retail box when it was sold new.






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