Jump to content

Photo

Cleaning motherboards


10 replies to this topic

#1 AMenard OFFLINE  

AMenard

    Chopper Commander

  • 203 posts
  • Location:Beauharnois, Qc, Canada

Posted Tue Dec 5, 2017 7:31 PM

Hi,

I've just bought the dirtiest C64 and 1702 I've ever saw. Although both are functionnal, they are in dire need of a bath. The C64 had some kind of spill on it and the power socket was lose inside the case. Luckilly, the spill wasn't acidic and didn't affect the traces and none of the cap leaked but I'm planning a full recap job on this one anyway.

My question is: Has anybody cleaned a motherboard by immersing it in isopropyl alcohol? And if you ever did, how much time did you let it dry? Since this model as no socketed chip, it's the only way that I know that would at least reach under those chips.

#2 Osgeld OFFLINE  

Osgeld

    River Patroller

  • 4,447 posts
  • Location:Nashville, TN

Posted Tue Dec 5, 2017 7:43 PM

depends on the concentration, lower the number the more water it has the longer it needs to sit 

 

i would do a few rinse dunks as well, dissolving a chunk of snot and letting it dry as a thin film of snot is more problematic as it spreads the contaminant making crystalline growth tween pins more widespread than just the side of a switch or whatever 


Edited by Osgeld, Tue Dec 5, 2017 7:45 PM.


#3 Keatah ONLINE  

Keatah

    Quadrunner

  • 18,936 posts

Posted Tue Dec 5, 2017 7:45 PM

I just put 'em in the dishwasher. Then blow out with hi-po air compressor.

#4 Eltigro OFFLINE  

Eltigro

    Stargunner

  • 1,574 posts

Posted Tue Dec 5, 2017 8:36 PM

I just put 'em in the dishwasher. Then blow out with hi-po air compressor.

 

Although I've always been afraid to try it, I used to work in a Fluke service center (for Fluke electrical test equipment like multimeters, calibrators, oscilloscopes...) and we had a dishwasher in the shipping area specifically for this.  I don't know the exact settings, but they would sometimes put boards that came in dirty in there.

 

Again, I don't know exactly what settings they used, but I think they did not use detergent and did not use the heat drying cycle or whatever of the dishwasher.  Just hot water blasting the board, then taking it out and drying it thoroughly with compressed air.



#5 CRTGAMER OFFLINE  

CRTGAMER

    Moonsweeper

  • 487 posts

Posted Tue Dec 5, 2017 9:59 PM

Let me see water and electronics not a good idea. What about the moisture soaking into the capacitors, be hard to dry them out let alone shorting any stray voltage. A trade off of just cleaning for functionality vs aesthetics to a PCB hidden inside a case.

#6 Osgeld OFFLINE  

Osgeld

    River Patroller

  • 4,447 posts
  • Location:Nashville, TN

Posted Tue Dec 5, 2017 10:16 PM

ideally they are full of liquid denser than water to begin with 



#7 Keatah ONLINE  

Keatah

    Quadrunner

  • 18,936 posts

Posted Tue Dec 5, 2017 11:04 PM

You have to use de-ionized water OR do the blowing out with the compressor gig. The problem is mineral deposits. You have to ensure none are left behind.

Edited by Keatah, Tue Dec 5, 2017 11:05 PM.


#8 Keatah ONLINE  

Keatah

    Quadrunner

  • 18,936 posts

Posted Wed Dec 6, 2017 2:32 AM

Let me see water and electronics not a good idea. What about the moisture soaking into the capacitors, be hard to dry them out let alone shorting any stray voltage. A trade off of just cleaning for functionality vs aesthetics to a PCB hidden inside a case.

 

Well, you can temporarily coat them with sealer, or remove them, or wash the board quickly so that there isn't enough time to soak and absorb any water.

 

A clean board will have better longevity and stability. Less contaminants to attract other contaminants. Less chance of arcing or other resistance paths. Cleaner switches. Many benefits.

 

And you don't HAVE to use a water bath. Many other options.



#9 mobiusstriptech OFFLINE  

mobiusstriptech

    Star Raider

  • 52 posts
  • Location:Ohio

Posted Wed Dec 6, 2017 6:50 PM

Using a dishwasher works well but yeah no detergent and no heat dry. Generally you are better off to remove whatever you can first.

I have "washed" boards in 90%+ IPA and used a toothbrush to scrub the board down. It does work just scrub it really well. You can blow it off with compressed air after if you want to be safe.

#10 AMenard OFFLINE  

AMenard

    Chopper Commander

  • Topic Starter
  • 203 posts
  • Location:Beauharnois, Qc, Canada

Posted Wed Dec 6, 2017 7:45 PM

I'll try it. For the price i paid for it I won't lose much, beside I'm doing a recap job on it so I'll remove them first. It'll give me more room to scrub with the tool brush.

#11 SignGuy81 OFFLINE  

SignGuy81

    Stargunner

  • 1,135 posts

Posted Wed Dec 6, 2017 9:06 PM

 

Let me see water and electronics not a good idea. What about the moisture soaking into the capacitors, be hard to dry them out let alone shorting any stray voltage. A trade off of just cleaning for functionality vs aesthetics to a PCB hidden inside a case.

 

I used to repair industrial electronics.  This is how we washed them.  We washed the boards in a sink, ran water all over them, sprayed Greased Lightning on them, scrubbed with a paint brush, rinsed thoroughly and put in a dryer.  No problem whatsoever.






0 user(s) are browsing this forum

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users