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Astrocade Video Art Videos

Astrocade Bally Arcade Video Art Bally BASIC AstroBASIC Blue Ram BASIC Vipersoft BASIC

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#26 ballyalley OFFLINE  

ballyalley

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Posted Fri Nov 30, 2018 6:52 PM

I added a Bally BASIC program called Computer Art that was released in 1980 by W&W Software Sales and written by Bob Weber. It is a video art program for the Bally Arcade/Astrocade that creates random art with geometric designs and patterns.
 
Here is a screenshot of the Electronic Visualization Center and Bally Arcade/Astrocade Video Art Overview:

Computer Art (1980)(WandW Software Sales)(Screenshot)_044_Reduced.jpg

Bob Weber wrote many dozens of programs for the Astrocade. Here is some background about the company written by Paul Thacker:

"W&W Software was a very early and prolific tape software company, with programming done by Bob Weber. They released 9 compilation tapes with five programs each, along with a couple of bonus programs. The first seven tapes (that's 35 programs) were released in 1979, with two more tapes coming in 1980. These were later re-released for AstroBASIC, but there were no new releases, though Bob Weber would occasionally publish programs in the Arcadian."

Here is a 25-minute overview and video of "Computer Art" on YouTube:



You can watch or download the video from Archive.org, here:
 
https://archive.org/...lyAstrocade1980

The video is linked from BallyAlley.com, here:

http://www.ballyalle...rAstrocadeVideo

This video is broken into several parts. Here is a breakdown of the entire video to make viewing it easier to find what you're looking for in this video:

0:00 - Computer Art, Overview of Program
4:32 - Computer Art - Running the program
22:53 - Computer Art - BASIC Program Listing
24:15 - End Credits

Computer Art is on Tape 9, which contains:

Inspector Clew-So - Tests your deductive powers.
Solitaire - See if the computer can win!
TV Ghost - Goblin insults you on Halloween.
Computer Art - Geometric designs and patterns.
Clock - Turn your TV into a digital clock.

An ad from the November 6, 1980 Arcadian reads:

W&W Software Sales

We have nine tapes with five programs each, with or without listings. Or get listings only so you can pick and choose any of the 45 available programs. Excellent variety, color, graphics, use of hand controller, and much more. Games, business programs, and teaching aides for children and adults. Send 25 cents for more information and a copy of Air Traffic Controller, or SAE for information only.

Bob Weber gave permission to place his software into the public domain in his interview that was posted to BallyAlley.com on May 18, 2003. Here are some quotes from that interview:

Adam - Who was the other "W" in W&W Software?

Bob - The other "W" was my wife, Jeri. She did all the business work for the company, getting a DBA, maintaining checking accounts, etc.

Adam - Could you give a little history of yourself; of your company?

Bob - I became interested in computers at a very early age. I read a lot of science fiction and was always intrigued by the stories involving computers. I made first contact in 1967 at RETS Electronic school. They had a training computer called the Bitran 6. I was hooked from then on. I taught myself programming on a reverse polish notation calculator that was able to run 72 step programs. Next came the Bally with its unique tiny basic, and finally, the TI99/4A. I've done a little programming since then, but there is so much available on the Internet, and so little time, I have given up programming in BASIC.

Adam - Could you make this official, and donate your programs into the public domain?

Bob - All my programs are public domain. We really did not sell very many back then, and it was mostly for fun. We sold them to try and cover the expense of tapes and mailing. I think altogether we only took in about $200.00

Adam - What type of software and hardware did you use (Bally BASIC, Blue Ram, Keyboard, printer, etc)?

Bob - I eventually had it all. I had a Blue Ram, a keyboard, and a thermal printer. There was a Blue Ram kit you could buy back then and a lot of us assembled our own to save money. Those were the days, huh?
 

Nice interview, right?

"Computer Art" is some of the earliest computer art that was sold for the Bally Arcade/Astrocade. It's a great way to start your journey into viewing video art on this system.

Adam



#27 ballyalley OFFLINE  

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Posted Mon Feb 25, 2019 1:13 PM

I added a video overview of the "AstroBASIC" game by Chessette by Craig Anderson.  This game was published in CURSOR 2, no. 4 (November/December 1980): 76-77.

This is a simple, two-player-only version of Chess for the Bally Arcade/Astrocade. The pieces are drawn to the screen and the players each take turns moving them using special to/from notation. Read the complete documentation for Chessette in the Cursor newsletter to understand the rules.

 

This video shows a complete, 6-move game: ending with a trapped queen:

Sandor Takacs vs Josef Emil Krejcik
Vienna blitz (1920), Vienna AUT

This video is broken into several parts. Here is a breakdown of the entire video to make viewing it easier to find what you're looking for in this video:

0:00 - Chessette, Overview of game
2:57 - Chessette - Running and playing the game
5:54 - Chessette - BASIC Program Listing
7:01 - End Credits

Chessette runs in only 1.8K of RAM. It's a simple, but effective proof-of-concept as to whether a chess game with graphics could be created on the Astrocade.

 

This program was typed into "AstroBASIC" on a real Bally Arcade/Astrocade by Lance Squire in February 2019.  It was digitially archived by me using BallyBin/AstroWAV 1.4 on February 24, 2019.  The game game can be downloaded here:

 

http://www.ballyalle...tml#ChessetteAB

 

Enjoy!

 

Adam



#28 ballyalley OFFLINE  

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Posted Wed Mar 13, 2019 10:55 AM

I added a video overview of RND (Art) by Super Software (Rob Rosenhouse). RND (Art) appeared in a classified ad in Arcadian 2, no. 7 (May 19, 1980): 66. A printed BASIC listing appeared in Arcadian 4, no. 2 (Dec. 07, 1981): 17. This program was free when ordering Super Software's catalog.

This program was free when ordering Super Software's catalog.



This video art program was submitted on a tape to Bob Fabris around November 1981.  In addition to RANDOM ART, the same tape also contained FALLING STARS and LASER BATTLE.  The latter two programs were NOT meant to be printed in the ARCADIAN newsletter.  Bob Rosenhouse requested printouts of the latter two programs from Bob Fabris.

You can view or download this video overview from archive.org:

https://archive.org/...lyAstrocade1980

This video is broken into several parts, to make viewing it easier for those interested in only certain portions of this video history.

0:00 - RND (Art), Overview of Program
3:40 - RND (Art), Program Loading and Running
5:21 - RND (Art), BASIC Listing
5:56 - End Credits

Archive Note:

This program was typed-in on August 3, 2016 by me.  It was converted to Bally BASIC and AstroBASIC using two Bally Arcade/Astrocade archiving utilities: txt2prg and KCS.

Enjoy!

Adam



#29 ballyalley OFFLINE  

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Posted Thu Mar 14, 2019 5:58 PM

I added a video overview of "Diminishing Boxes" by Matt Giwer from ARCADIAN 2, no. 8 (Jun. 23, 1980): 73.



The Arcadian has no comments or instruction for this program.

On June 26, 2013, Paul Thacker writes:

"This is a typical art program for the Bally Arcade. It draws closely spaced boxes that are pretty large at first, then move in to a small box at the center of the screen. Then it starts again drawing slightly displaced boxes over top of the old ones. If a pixel is drawn over, it gets erased, so you end up with a lot of different patterns.  While I'm sure you get the BASIC idea, with programs like this, a video would definitely be worth a thousand words."

You can view or download this video overview from archive.org:

https://archive.org/...lyAstrocade1980

This video is broken into several parts, to make viewing it easier for those interested in only certain portions of this video history.

0:00 - Diminishing Boxes, Overview of Program
3:54 - Diminishing Boxes, Program Loading and Running
10:47 - Diminishing Boxes, BASIC Listing
11:15 - End Credits

This video art is simple, but the program is short.  Does this inspire anyone?

Adam



#30 ballyalley OFFLINE  

ballyalley

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Posted Wed Mar 20, 2019 9:36 PM

I added a video overview of the Bally Arcade/Astrocade game for "AstroBASIC" called "The Gate Escape" by WaveMakers. It was released on cassette tape #18 in May 1983.



You will be moving Little Novos using the joystick to guide him to collect the "x"s and avoid the villains:

The Hero - Little Novos
Villain 1 - Go-For-It Gopher
Bad Guy 2 and 3 - Obscene Jester
Mr. Nasty 4 and 5 - Quaker Otis
The Last Evil - Morty Post Mortem

Novos appears on the top of the screen, the villain is on the bottom to start. You can re-align the gates by running into them and blocking off entire sections of the screen to trap the bad guys out. You cannot go through the center of a gate, or move if the joystick is pointed at a wall or gate center.

The villain will try to make a jump to your sector of the screen by using his transporter. When it appears on the screen you have a limited amount of time before he makes the jump. The transporter homes in on the sound you make and if you don't steal it from the villain quick enough you'll be in serious trouble.

Difficulty levels increase as you go from screen to screen by collecting all of the x's from the screen.

Each player stays on their own level and keeps their own x's on screen.

DO NOT HALT THIS PROGRAM This will CRASH the BASIC program and you will have to re-load the tape to play again. BE SURE TO INPUT THE CORRECT NUMBER OF PLAYERS BEFORE STSRTING THE GAME, using knob (1) and Trigger (1).

THE END is just that, you have used all lives (5) shown in blue or red on the lower right frame of screen.


This video is broken into several parts, to make viewing it easier for those interested in only certain portions of this video history.

0:00 - The Gate Escape, Overview of Program
9:25 - The Gate Escape, Program Loading and Running
17:01 - The Gate Escape, BASIC Listing
18:25 - End Credits

You can view or download this video overview from archive.org:

https://archive.org/...deAstrocade1983

Review of Wavemakers' The Gate Escape
The Game Player, Column  #11
ARCADIAN 5, no. 11 (Sep. 28, 1983): 165.

In this latest edition to the WAVEMAKERS catalog, the player(s) will be maneuvering a little fellow called "Little Novos" around the playfield to collect a scattering of X's, while at the same time trying to avoid the "Villain."  There is also a number of gates throughout the playfield, which the player can orient to block or trap the Villain while he tries to grab more X's.  The playfield is very difficult to describe, as far as this system of "gates" is concerned. (It is not a maze.)  The gates pivot at their center, so that they may be positioned east-west or north-south.

Anyway, GATE ESCAPE is a very enjoyable and challenging game to play.  It may be played by one to four players, with each player starting with five "lives."  The level of difficulty increases as you go from screen to screen collecting the X's for points.  Each new screen, or playfield, brings a new Villain.

GATE ESCAPE was well liked by everyone, though some found it hard to score.  It takes practice and planning to rack up a high score on this one, and there is plenty of fun doing so.  Graphics are quite nice, and the music (which is always a plus in any game) is a welcome addition to the sound effects.  GATE ESCAPE is another good buy from WAVEMAKERS.

Enjoy!

 

Adam







Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: Astrocade, Bally Arcade, Video Art, Bally BASIC, AstroBASIC, Blue Ram BASIC, Vipersoft BASIC

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