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IEEE-488 card with TMS9914A controller


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#1 FarmerPotato OFFLINE  

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Posted Fri Feb 8, 2019 4:59 PM

cbmeeks accidentally spoke the name of the IEEE-488 card, which got me thinking.

 

IEEE-488 is a communications standard also known as GPIB. (General Purpose Instruments Bus.)

It was commonly used to connect electronics test and laboratory equipment. Commodore PET used it as a peripheral bus.

 

TI made a lot of GPIB gear, especially the one-chip TMS9914A controller. They designed a GPIB card for the TI-99/4A, but it was not marketed.

 

The schematic for the TI-99/4A IEEE-488 card is here: http://www.mainbyte....tic/ieee488.jpg

It contains a DSR. It contains a PAL, however its used for only 4 output signals which are pretty obvious. 

 

Here is the TI manual for the TMS9914A controller chip: http://bitsavers.tra...anual_Dec82.pdf

 

The first product of  National Instruments was a GPIB card for the PDP-11. (Not to be confused with TI.. NI made an employee T-shirt saying "National Instruments--Not Selling Calculators since 1976.")   NI had a second source or clone chip, NAT9914, pin compatible with TMS9914A controller.  

http://www.ni.com/pd...als/372013b.pdf

 

I have a pile of GPIB bus testers in my garage with NAT9914 chips. I'm not sure if I have any actually useful GPIB devices.   You can still get TMS9914A from China surplus. 

 

Here is a Dr Dobbs article on making a GPIB: http://www.drdobbs.c...-gpib/184408548

 

I'm not saying I actually want a GPIB card, just collecting together the puzzle pieces here.


Edited by FarmerPotato, Fri Feb 8, 2019 5:02 PM.


#2 peterfleeman OFFLINE  

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Posted Fri Feb 8, 2019 5:01 PM

I want one! :)

#3 OLD CS1 OFFLINE  

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Posted Fri Feb 8, 2019 5:05 PM

I have two Amiga Zorro cards with these chips.



#4 Lee Stewart OFFLINE  

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Posted Fri Feb 8, 2019 5:59 PM

... IEEE-488 is a communications standard also known as GPIB. (General Purpose Instruments Bus.)

It was commonly used to connect electronics test and laboratory equipment. ...

 

Though it was used first and foremost for interfacing scientific instruments, the ‘I’ of GPIB actually stands for “Interface”.  Hewlett-Packard developed the interface specification for interfacing its scientific instruments with each other and data-processing/reporting devices and named it the Hewlett-Packard Interface Bus or HPIB.  After it caught on with other manufacturers, who, quite naturally, did not want “Hewlett-Packard” in the name/description of their equipment, it then became known also as the General Purpose Interface Bus or GPIB.  Over the course of my career as, principally, an analytical chemist, I used a lot of scientific instruments whose components were tied together with this interface.

 

...lee



#5 BeeryMiller OFFLINE  

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Posted Sat Feb 9, 2019 9:22 AM

also as the General Purpose Interface Bus or GPIB.  Over the course of my career as, principally, an analytical chemist, I used a lot of scientific instruments whose components were tied together with this interface.

 

...lee

 

Agilent or HP 5890 perhaps?



#6 Lee Stewart OFFLINE  

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Posted Sat Feb 9, 2019 11:16 AM

Agilent or HP 5890 perhaps?

 

For sure.  I do not remember exactly when instruments using IEEE 488 interfacing came to the lab in which I worked, but I remember the interface specs from the late 1970s.

 

I very much remember working with another interface, a 50-pin parallel BCD interface, on an HP 97S calculator, among other equipment, in the late 1970s through the 1980s.

 

These all quickly gave way to RS232C due to much smaller connectors, much thinner cabling and much, much longer allowable distances between components.  This scenario continues with Ethernet, etc., but I digress ...

 

...lee



#7 Ksarul OFFLINE  

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Posted Sat Feb 9, 2019 1:34 PM

There is a version of the schematic here in the schematics thread too, so you can get a nice clear print of both versions of the TI board (yes, there were two variants). Those schematics also have the equations for the PAL, so you just need to resynthesize them to get the proper JEDEC file to program a chip. . .

 

There were also quite a few printers with an IEEE interface, and as the bus supported multiple masters, you could also use it to interface computers in a simple workgroup using the same peripheral equipment.






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