Jump to content

Photo

Your evolution as a collector


32 replies to this topic

#26 Keatah OFFLINE  

Keatah

    Missile Commander

  • 22,184 posts

Posted Yesterday, 5:03 PM

I really don't evolve as time goes on, I de-evolve.  When i start collecting something, I jump all the way in the deep end.  Then as time goes on, I start looking at my collection and start to slow down.  Case in point, Atari carts.  When i started to seriously collect like 3 years ago, I was grabbing everything, label variations,system variations,etc.  Now, I'm putting the variations on the back burner and concentarting on just getting carts i don't have.  I've done this with everything I collect over the years, toys, monster stuff, comics, etc.  I should know better now, but I always get too excited and overdo it.

 

That's a natural evolution many many collectors experience. Going from the general to the specific. Going from acquiring everything to only certain things or simply becoming more selective no matter how slight.
 



#27 AtariLeaf ONLINE  

AtariLeaf

    Epic Godlike Canadian

  • 11,305 posts
  • Location:Ontario Canada

Posted Yesterday, 5:09 PM

On this go round of collecting I went from 2008 to about 2011 buying everything. In the following years I bought less and sold more. I would do big purges every couple of years until now my entire retro game collection fits in one small box. I still have way too many systems but one of the reasons for that is parts machines in case certain chips die so I have some backups like TIA's, etc.



#28 Keatah OFFLINE  

Keatah

    Missile Commander

  • 22,184 posts

Posted Yesterday, 5:48 PM

The worst thing I ever did is start cataloguing my games. I did this because I was finding they were being stored more than being played. They were being stored because I had so many, and had started inadvertently buying doubles of games.

 

I agree completely with this. I had done the same. And to top it off (and make it worse) I used a database program on the Apple II (back in the day) called PFS. It was very fast at first but quickly slowed down. And to my late discovery, about 400 entries into the creation of the database, it only remained fast on the first data field. Anything else was beginning to take several minutes to locate.

 

So it was a disappointing bust - trying to electronically and modernly catalog all my cartridges and systems.

 

Today it is so much different. Today in a virtual digital collection you can keyword search and get results in seconds or less. Even across a multi-TB JBOD array. And in an emulation collection its even easier to build as each entry itself IS the information you want. the program you want. And you rely on the host OS disk routines to do the organization. It's made to be fast and efficient and expandable. The whole concept revolves around the file-search feature present in all modern OS'es, your personal favorites cache, and a semi-organic folder/file tree that uses descriptive filenames as the entry itself.

 

If I want to see all the systems Defender was made for I can do that, or if I want to find the obscure BASIC program I wrote in the 7th grade I can do that too. in seconds. And once found, it can be run instantly in the appropriate emulator.

 

It's not unlike Rom Hunter's rom collection. If you want to see games by a certain author you can do that. If you want to see all Atari Inc. games you can do that. If you want to see all games made in a certain year of a certain revision level or proto, you can do that too!



#29 Keatah OFFLINE  

Keatah

    Missile Commander

  • 22,184 posts

Posted Yesterday, 5:51 PM

On this go round of collecting I went from 2008 to about 2011 buying everything. In the following years I bought less and sold more. I would do big purges every couple of years until now my entire retro game collection fits in one small box. I still have way too many systems but one of the reasons for that is parts machines in case certain chips die so I have some backups like TIA's, etc.

 

Impressive! What is it you collect for? Sounds like from mention of TIA you're doing VCS and Harmony cart. But what else?



#30 Machine OFFLINE  

Machine

    Dragonstomper

  • 657 posts
  • Location:Colorado

Posted Yesterday, 6:15 PM

From my first VCS(late 70'S) to 2013, I bought games I liked. Ended up getting almost complete collections for ALL the usual suspects. Figured I might as well complete them. This was a dangerous turn. Ended up collecting more than playing.

Collection was amazing, but it was more like a job than a fun hobby.

 

Then, 6 years ago my home and everything I owned goes up in flames in the Colorado Forest fire(2013).  I was/am sick about it. Ended up figuring out I will never get most of it back so I decided to focus my game collection.

Decided to go full Jagaur, and just a few other interesting games on other systems. Luckily, I re-bought most of the Jaguar stuff over 5 years ago.

 

I like focusing on one system. It is a lot of fun when a new Jag game comes out. I get excited and it seems more special than just buying stuff for EVERYTHING.



#31 Keatah OFFLINE  

Keatah

    Missile Commander

  • 22,184 posts

Posted Yesterday, 7:07 PM

From my first VCS(late 70'S) to 2013, I bought games I liked. Ended up getting almost complete collections for ALL the usual suspects. Figured I might as well complete them. This was a dangerous turn. Ended up collecting more than playing.Collection was amazing, but it was more like a job than a fun hobby.


I'm not exactly sure when my slow accumulation of videogame cartridges turned into a collection. I was happy and content when it reached 2 systems and about 30-40 carts each. That would be the VCS and Intellivision. Incidentally, or not, most of our local arcades seemed to have about 30-40 games. So maybe I unwittingly used that number as a defining point.

---

In the months leading up to getting rid of my storage and warehouse efforts it felt more and more like a job. One of the precipitating factors was when ports started proliferating. There's only so many versions of Defender one can play while still enjoying it. And trying to get multiple 5 or 10 ports, 1 for each system, instantly became a hollow chore. I couldn't enjoy the games. My buddies couldn't enjoy the games. And it was a major hassle going to storage to retrieve something.

If you really think hard about and grind down to the very basics, collecting beyond 2 or 3 systems is very very self-defeating.

So. Currently I maintain a couple vintage PC rigs and a modern one. This covers all my electronic needs past, present, and likely future. They're repairable and replaceable and extremely versatile.

By staying in the virtual digital realm, punctuated by a few special physical items, I'm free to easily segue from topic to topic. For example I just finished up organizing and collating all my older versions of X-Plane, all nice and tidy. Kept the mail order boxes too, btw. Next it will be all the versions and printed and scanned material for Doom. That's a week-long gig. But it'll be fun and there's no timetable to completion. Just having a couple of strategy guides and books is more than enough to lend a sense of physical presence.

 

 

I like focusing on one system. It is a lot of fun when a new Jag game comes out. I get excited and it seems more special than just buying stuff for EVERYTHING.

 

That's the ultimate evolution of a collection. Every acquisition becomes a special treat.

 

Collectors often think the speed at which something is growing is a benchmark of how well their collection is doing. It is not.


Edited by Keatah, Yesterday, 7:17 PM.


#32 BassGuitari OFFLINE  

BassGuitari

    Glorified Toaster

  • 6,990 posts
  • Remember how bright the future used to look?
  • Location:Fiorina 161

Posted Today, 10:49 AM

My collecting arc is probably pretty similar other those of others. When I started out, I picked up just about anything I could find. I also had the benefit of starting out while stuff was still cheap and plentiful, in the late '90s. I slowed down a bit around 2010, probably due to a combination of factors, such as the seemingly exponentially increasing popularity of the hobby (and, ergo, also prices); I was back in school; I had recently purchased a house with my wife; the space my collection was taking up was starting to become a problem; I had already collected most of the common/ish stuff I was interested in and it tended to be relatively big ticket items that were left (or finding yet another system to branch out to and start fresh with!)

 

These days I'm pretty much in maintenance mode--managing, organizing, re-organzing, repairing/refurbishing, and culling excess. And playing, of course! Although with so many different systems and games, it's challenging to spread the love.


Edited by BassGuitari, Today, 11:00 AM.


#33 Flojomojo OFFLINE  

Flojomojo

    You can't handle the truth. No truth-handler, you.

  • 16,430 posts
  • I deride your truth-handling abilities.

Posted Today, 10:57 AM

Collectors often think the speed at which something is growing is a benchmark of how well their collection is doing. It is not.

 

Yikes. I am an accumulator. I do not like the sound of that word. 






0 user(s) are browsing this forum

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users