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BigO

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About BigO

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    River Patroller

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    http://atariage.com/forums/topic/262372-closedone-trak-play-atari-2600vcs-games-with-your-5200-trak-ball/

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  1. It seems like, according to my email notifications, I miss everything. I've been in a couple of times and there was no visible activity. But I get emails that tell me what i missed. Then i read the emails of disjointed pieces of conversations and realize I'm still not missing anything. Gotta figure out how to shut down those emails so I don't know about what I'm not missing.
  2. Kind of off topic but, "This site contains technical information about the Atari 260 game system." S/b 2600.
  3. Just stumbled across this old post while looking for something else. Since the OP didn't report back, I thought I'd comment with my experience for anyone looking at this down the road. The outputs of the 4538's would be equivalent signals to what trackball joystick emulators use as joystick signals. I tried to pick these signals off to add joystick emulation capability to a CX53 enhancement kit I built years ago. The attempt was essentially a failure. The retriggerable one-shot configuration results in a minimum pulse width that is too short compared to a typical JS emulator, so the movement is choppy and you have to spin the ball really fast to get it to steady out. If you want a workout, it might be fine. Otherwise, you'd have to change the RC timing component values in the circuit to get it to behave as a workable joystick emulator. If I recall correctly, I looked into externally paralleling in some components to change the timing and I found that I'd have to actually break into the circuitry. As I was going for easily reversible, no-solder adaptation, I bailed on that idea. (I don't like playing JS games with a trackball anyway).
  4. Galagon arrived. Hope to get some quality time with it later today.

    1. johnnywc

      johnnywc

      Thanks for the support, I hope you enjoy it! :) If you do and feel inspired, please consider leaving a review in the AA store, we developers love that sort of stuff. ;)    Have fun!

    2. BigO

      BigO

      I'm not particularly good at it. And I wasn't a Galaga player in the arcades. I liked playing the WIP, and was really impressed by the visuals achieved on the 2600, so it really was almost as much about supporting the homebrewers as it was a love of the game.

       

      On the other hand, I wouldn't buy a game I didn't like just to support the cause. I mean, I'll buy multiple boxes of Thin Mints, but I'm not spending good money on those nasty coconut things. :)

  5. Does expressing an interest in Feb. 2018 qualify for having a turn?
  6. Just noticed that Galagon is now available without the $15 box. As promised, it's on order. $50 was just too much for me.

    Is the full ROM available to put on my Harmony?

    1. Stephen

      Stephen

      Great game though - don't forget to check out Gorf.  That's another day one purchase!

    2. BigO

      BigO

      I'm not really familiar with Gorf. I think I've played it one of my consoles but can't remember anything about it now.

  7. My immune system can beat up your virus, thankfully. Not a pleasant time to be sure, but not the sickest either of us have ever felt. Over it now. Overall, we're feeling blessed.

     

    1. Show previous comments  5 more
    2. GoldLeader

      GoldLeader

      Oh,  Thanks!  (Thought maybe something I said got misinterpreted for a minute)...

    3. BigO

      BigO

      Had it not been for several co-workers with similar symptoms, and with timelines slightly ahead of mine testing positive at various labs, I would have learned toward the false positive theory.

       

      While it wasn't the worst I've felt in my life, it was the worst I've felt in at least 30 years. I just don't ever feel sick. So, it was definitely something unusual.

    4. BigO

      BigO

      Honestly, this is the type of outcome I suspected I'd have if I ever got it. But I have to admit that the timing, immediately following the non-trivial trauma and invasion of knee-replacement surgery did have me a bit concerned.

       

      Surgery Monday. Covid Wednesday. It was apparently incubating but undetectable via the pre-op PCR test Friday at 5:30 PM.

       

      Thankfully, i didn't share it with any of the surgical team or post-op care team.

  8. I've been looking at resin molding and I agree that it looks like a viable option. Not sure how, but I think I've seen custom keypad overlays. I think I might prefer something like some of the Euro cartridges where they have a hinged flap overlaying the keypad to transfer the force down into the pad.
  9. Nice. I also worked on a Barrage game for Microvision. I did mine with a little PIC uController using assembly language. I'm not sure I could bring myself to use a real processor for this. I got as far as generating the falling objects, controlling the catcher (paddle control) and tracking the score. In my mind I was writing a Kaboom! clone. It was fun reverse engineering the LCD controller protocol, figuring out the paddle reading, and making the speaker chirp. Level shifting was still hacked up. Having solved what I felt were the fundamental problems, I set it aside and never went back to it. If I were forced to come up with a "commercial" product for the Microvision now, that's where I might employ a real processor. My focus would be a "universal cartridge" to eliminate the need to produce that huge cartridge enclosure toward the end of supporting new game development. Some sort of plug in slot would allow memory of some flavor, carrying the game, to be plugged in. It would be really nice to insulate game developers from having to deal with the intricacies and quirks of the OEM LCD communication. Likely, the market, so to speak, would end up calling for a flash cart loaded via USB. That's cool but I like the game-per-cartridge retro vibe, too. Unlike when I originally was tinkering in this arena, the reality of the replacement screen project(s) means there might be a meaningful community interest in goofy projects like this. Given real life, I won't do any of this. But I would follow with interest anyone who did work up something like this.
  10. The clowns from Circus Atari. Or maybe the Human Cannonball. :-)
  11. If you were thinking of getting Covid-19 an undetectably short time prior to knee replacement, don't. Just sayin'.

    1. Atarigirlwonder

      Atarigirlwonder

      Sorry to hear that. Here's to a speedy recovery!

  12. Per the "no news is good news" notification method, I'm negative for covid. Now just have to get up early tomorrow, then take about a two hour nap, then work through months of serious pain. Then, I'll have matching unicompartmental knee prostheses and relatively little pain.

     

    I hope my borgification then ceases expansion, at least for a few years.

  13. If not for cleaning my office before I take time off for surgery, I wonder when I would dump the emergency supply of ketchup packets from my desk drawer.

  14. Interesting idea. If I had sufficient ambition to make something like this, I would consider EEPROM instead of flash. While doing development work, it might be a cool feature to be able to just poke a new value in a single "ROM" location in a straightforward manner. Also, it seems like the EEPROM would be more directly analogous to the original ROM chip (of which I know very little) so might simplify the interface to the console. Being simple myself, I gravitate toward simple. Often, that makes things more complicated.
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