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marlowe221

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About marlowe221

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    Star Raider
  • Birthday 04/05/1982

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  1. Excellent point! I'm definitely leaning more toward the idea that the serial number thing is more for high score tracking purposes than security. And it makes sense for them to distribute digital copies. After all, most people (shoot, even most people interested in older video games) don't have an Atari 2600 or even a Retron77 sitting around at home. But Stella is readily available on any and all platforms and will essentially run on a potato as far as required computational horsepower is concerned.
  2. According to this article in Gamespot (https://www.gamespot.com/articles/ex-activision-pioneers-form-audacity-games-will-develop-new-atari-2600-titles/1100-6488500/) each purchase comes with a ROM that is Stella compatible "with the same serial number", whatever that means exactly. So I'm not sure that a lot of hardware-level security measures would serve much purpose. I suppose this serial number might be used to track down the person who uploaded the game to a ROM site or something maybe, but it doesn't sound like on-cart security would have much point. 🤷‍♂️
  3. I totally understand the sentiment in the OP even though I came to the system a little later than most people in the forum. I didn't get mine until '89 or so (I was born in '82). I wanted an NES like all my friends had but we couldn't afford it. Instead my mother picked up a Vader model and 20-ish carts at a yard sale for $40. I was thrilled to have it and played the crap out of it. I still have that console and it still works to this day. It was my only console until 1993 when I got an SNES - even then I would still trade it out with the 2600 at times and play it instead of the newer console. Now I keep a Retron 77 and a small stack of games on my computer desk hooked to my monitor at all times. I can switch over inputs and have a quick game of Beamrider or Galaxian any time. It's great! I play plenty of modern games too (though more indie games and fewer AAA games as time goes on) but I will always make sure I have a way to play Atari. It just fills a gap that nothing else really does for me.
  4. Thanks, that's very interesting. Also, what's your podcast called? Sounds like I should be listening to it!
  5. I'm a software guy, so I'm wondering if they plan on writing these games the old fashioned way or plan to use a more modern solution like batari basic. Shoot, you can even compile Java to Assembly if you want to, though sometimes the memory management gets a little wonky in the translation and you have to fix it manually.
  6. I would like to make a report Beamrider - Activision - NTSC - cartridge does not work on the default firmware. I did not try to load the game from a ROM off the SD card. I loaded up the latest stable Stella firmware and it worked from the cartridge slot right away.
  7. I just wanted to thank the developers of Stella for making such an excellent port of the emulator to the Retron 77. My lovely wife gave me a Retron 77 for Christmas yesterday and I just got Stella running on it. It's a great improvement in every way, though I've only tried actual cartridges so far. Thanks for all the hard work, Stella team!
  8. I picked up the 2019 wood grain version today. M Network games are gone. A few Activision titles in their place. Haven’t added any games to it yet. Quality seems decent overall compared to my 2017 version. Edit - The Dpad is significantly better than my 2017 model.
  9. Ill keep using my Vader model 2600 as long as it works and I can find CRTs to use it with. Ive never tried hooking it up to a modern flatscreen so I dont know how that would work. But the day it craps out on me, or the day I cant find another CRT more likely, Ill be building a Raspberry Pii or similar with a 2600 case. I think the main challenge will be finding a decent and semi-authentic feeling controller for Atari stuff. But the idea of an all-in-one Atari machine that encompasses everything from the 2600 to the ST is very appealing.
  10. I would pay real money for that. Especially if the joystick switches were high quality.
  11. What about Gravitar? That game had quite a bit going on for a space game on the 2600.
  12. Update - I tested the stock 7800 "painline" controller with Asteroids for 7800. The proline seems to work just fine. I also tested a Sega Genesis controller I had laying around, out of curiosity. The game freaked out with the Genesis controller plugged in. It kept hyperspacing over and over again and did not respond to any button presses. I was under the impression that the 7800 would recognize a Genesis pad as a 2600 joystick. Is that not the case?
  13. The sticks listed in my OP. A Suncom Tac-2, a Wico Command (baseball bat handle), and a rebuilt CX-40.
  14. Haven't tested it with the stock 7800 joystick. Can't stand that thing. But I will endure the pain to test it and report back!
  15. On the 2600 games... Defender - At first, I couldn't make the ship go to the left. But it seemed that after I played the game for a while, the situation improved and I could go left without issue. Enduro - Sometimes the game would recognize me as having pulled back on the stick (brakes) rather than steering to the left. This was intermittant. Asteroids (2600) - This game was the best one by far. Almost no issues of any kind - possibly perfect but I'm not sure of that. The whole, console interprets "left" as "down" happened in 7800 Asteroids several times. Lots of unintentional hyperspacing...
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