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zzip

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zzip last won the day on February 2 2018

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About zzip

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    River Patroller

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  1. Looks good and faithful, but I just played to level 9, and didn't see a single alien, are they in the game?
  2. What does objecting to a topic other people like talking about accomplish?
  3. Well base game prices haven't increased in years, and adjusted for inflation, they are now cheaper than the 2600 days, While game development is far more expensive. Selling optional add-ons is one of the things that allows the economics to work. But it also pays to be a smart consumer here. Ignore the need to buy day one, and you can get fantastic deals later. Don't like microtransactions? Don't buy them. Don't support games that make them non-optional. Honestly though, for all the talk I hear about microtransactions being necessary, I've never enountered a game where that is the case. I rarely pay for add-ons
  4. I see more and more games that aren't early access add new features some time after they've been released. The idea that a game is "finished" the day it releases seems like an aging paradigm. These days adding features helps keep a game and community alive for years
  5. PC is like this, console is less so. Console developers really have to squeeze the performance out of limited hardware, so they still do heavy optimization
  6. This is all very true Also buying games day one is overrated except maybe when it's multiplayer where the online population dwindles over time. If you wait, all the early bugs will get fixed, and there's a good chance you can get it on sale. I'm only just now playing Witcher 3, I got the complete edition on sale for $15, If I bought at launch and paid full price for DLCs, it would have cost over $100. The game had lots of performance problems at launch, but seems to run fine now.
  7. For me? Easy- NES! I never thought I would be bored hanging out with friends playing videogames, but when my friends started getting NESes that's exactly what happened. Maybe I was at a point in my life where I was too old for games like Super Mario, or maybe because I already had an ST and that made the 8-bit NES feel dated, but I never saw the system as the mind-blowing thing that everyone else seemed to.
  8. For me it comes down to: original hardware takes up too much space to have it set up, technology moved on, it is hard to get the necessary hardware to connect some old systems to modern TVs. When I last dug out my old hardware, I discovered that many disks/carts would no longer boot, the cables had become brittle and other signs of hardware aging. I don't have the time/knowledge to refurbish this stuff. And I really just want to play the old games without hassle, so that's why I prefer emulation
  9. It started on consoles when hard drives were required to install games, it started on PC sooner Before that there are plenty of games that were released buggy, and you sometimes had to manually download a patch and apply it manually. The Original Sims on PC comes to mind from the year 2000. The original disc was very buggy and crashed all the time, they released several patches that you had to download and pray that it fixed your issue.. then each expansion pack (also on disc) added its own bug fixes and share of new bugs. I swore off PC gaming in the early 2000s because it became such a mess. But the automated patches have made things a lot better than they were. Another aspect is this practice keeps games alive longer. Something like Minecraft would not have survived this long without new features being added frequently. And No Man's Sky would have been completely dead in the water if the 2016 release was the one we were stuck with. Instead they have turned the game around with a number of updates. So I can't categorically say that it was better in the old days in this case. Imagine if Atari had the ability to patch Pacman or ET BITD...
  10. I emulate on a PC, so I can use whatever controller suits the needs best, but in all honesty, usually the keyboard does a better job emulating those old controllers than an actual gamepad, for the reasons you describe.
  11. Atari800 definitely supports Artifacting. But you have to enable it. Turn on the NTSC filter, and select the type of artifacting you'd like (affects the colors produced by it) IIRC, in real life GTIA and CTIA chips produced different colors when artifacting, and atari800 tries to support both.
  12. Any plans to allow specifying the path to the config file on the command line?
  13. For me, emulation is almost always better, unless you have a system that lacks near-perfect emulation (like Jaguar)
  14. New England, so pretty far from SoCal, unfortunately.
  15. zzip

    Oculus Quest

    the worse part for me with VR is you know those sounds that your house normally makes due to settling or changes in temperature? Normally I tune them out, but in VR I will hear them and wonder if someone is trying to come through the front door or something
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