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KaeruYojimbo

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KaeruYojimbo last won the day on May 23 2019

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About KaeruYojimbo

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    River Patroller
  • Birthday 08/23/1976

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    Portland, OR

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  1. True, but you didn’t say value, you said which is like saying “The reason that guy’s overweight is he’s fat.” They’re synonyms. Besides that, scarcity is often a large part of what determines collectible value. If the T206 Honus Wagner card hadn’t been pulled from production, thus making it exceedingly rare, it would still be valuable because Wagner was one of the greatest baseball players of all time, but it probably wouldn’t be the most sought after card in the hobby. There are other factors, like a game being created by a small company running out of the back of a toy store that didn’t have the resources to produce and distribute large numbers of games. Maybe a better game could have overcome that, but there’s no guarantee. I actually agree with you there. Maybe that wasn’t clear enough in the rest of my first post, or maybe you didn’t read it all. But if it makes someone happy to throw thousands of dollars at a video game and their kids don’t have to go without food for a week or anything like that, then it’s their money, let them have their fun.
  2. Yep. That's what rarity is. That's way more exciting to me. I get the appeal of owning something rare to some extent, but it's way more interesting to me if someone tracks it down or stumbles across it than when they just throw a bunch of money at it. I don't think I've ever spent more than $50 on an individual 2600 game, and the biggest single purchase I ever made was getting Gas Hog, Master Builder and Bumper Bash together for a little under $100. Finding 3 pretty rare games (one of which I genuinely enjoy playing) for $30 each was more exciting for me than blowing several thousand on one crappy game, even if that game is one of the rarest of the rare, would ever be.
  3. I added a couple of sound effects (though probably not the final version of those sound effects) and now the "easter egg" shoots at you starting with the fourth level. Basically I spent a bunch of time making an enemy that rarely shows up slightly more dangerous if you make it far enough into the game. ShatteredEarth20210606.bin
  4. Point one four?! That's it buddy, I'm taking you in. You won't be making or selling any more Atari games tonight.
  5. Ha ha! Now that I know the secret, there's nothing to stop me from creating my own rival site! (Except for a complete lack of patience and dedication.)
  6. The Adventure board game thread inspired me to share an idea I had for an Atari-based card game and see if anyone else out there thought it had any legs. There are 2 decks of cards. One of Atari 2600 games or non-copyright-infringing parodies ("A.I.: The Alien Intelligence") and one of various events including ways to earn or lose money and opportunities to buy and sell games. Some examples: Auction: Turn over the top game card and players take turns bidding on it. Highest bid gets the game. Thrift Store: Turn over the top 5-10 game cards. Players take turns buying the games they want for $1 each. Game Store: Same as Thrift Store but games cost Full Market Value printed on card. Online Ad: Turn over the top 10 game cards. Player can either buy all 10 games for a set price or pass, giving the next player the chance to buy. etc. The games have point values and the winner is the first player to reach a set score. Only unique games would count towards a player's score (so you couldn't win with a bunch of copies of Pac-Man and Frogger)
  7. Yeah, I just use counters when I don't want something to move every frame, but it's arguable that I know what I'm doing. You could look into using fixed point math if you can free up some variables. I don't usually worry about debouncing the reset switch, but if you want to, you can recycle one of the variables from your main loop. I'd think about debouncing the fire button too. Now you immediately launch a torpedo when you start a new game.
  8. Dungeon immediately came to mind as a jumping off point for an Adventure board game. That or something tile-based, where players take turns drawing tiles to create the game board. For the enemies, you could do something like in Survive, where as part of their turn each player rolls a die to determine which monster they get to move that turn.
  9. When I was playing in the High Score Club regularly I would occasionally find a game I was able to do better at playing with a keyboard. It felt a little like cheating to play game in Stella rather than on real hardware specifically because I knew I’d get a better score that way (not enough to stop me from posting my scores though). One was Solar Fox. It’s pretty easy to go off course if you aren’t super precise with the joystick so I found the game much easier with a keyboard.
  10. Here's an updated version. Left Difficulty B: Ships block the ball Left Difficulty A: Ships don't bock the ball, you have to shoot it. For the curious: The continuous bouncing of the ball was inspired by an old C64 type-in game called Crabfight. I always thought it would be a good candidate for a bB port (and it has octopuses, so it's right in my wheelhouse), but I've never gotten around to it. Cosmic Combat 1.1.bin
  11. Yeah, just a one-off. I'm not sure how much else there would be to do really, besides maybe add sounds when the ball hits an edge. I think you lose a missile when you add paddles in bB. It's been a while since I looked at paddle support, but I know there was some trade-off. Not allowing the ships to block the ball would be a pretty easy change. Maybe it would be a good difficulty switch option. I might try that tomorrow.
  12. Torr was planning to play some Fortnite, but his PS5 is installing a massive system update. Since he has time to kill, he thought he'd dig out his trusty Atari 2600 and play some of his old favorites. But it's been a while since the last time he hooked it up, and now his Atari stuff is scattered around the house. Before he can play, he'll have to find his VCS, joystick, power supply and game cartridges and bring them back to the TV. In this game, you control Torr. Move him through the rooms of the house to find everything he needs to play some Yars' Revenge. To collect each item, you'll need to finish a minigame. (Well, eventually. Right now only 2 of the minigames are in the game, and they're a little rough around the edges still. You can just grab the power supply and cartridge without playing a minigame.) Once you have all four items, bring them to the TV room and touch the TV. And that's it. The game ends. You don't get a jewel-encrusted joystick or anything like that. This is still a work in progress. In addition to adding to more minigames, I want to improve the item location randomization and possibly add some sort of rating system that awards you stars when you finish based on how long it takes and how many times you have to play the minigames. Maybe a fifth item if I have room and can think of something (manual? snacks?). BoredQuest 20210529.bin
  13. 🎵 Anything I can do you can do better 🎵

  14. Not in those exact words. When I say "warning label" I'm saying it jokingly. But there were a few posts by people who seemed to want an ARM label so they could easily spot the games that don't conform to their idea of a real Atari 2600 game. (I actually went back and deleted most of the post you quoted, apparently while you were typing your response, because I really didn't like it upon re-reading it.) It's probably time to do what I should have done a while ago and self-ban myself from this thread.
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