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Found 17 results

  1. I've been doing a couple of tests lately loading and saving a 97KB DV80 file on a real TI-99/4a with PEB, using a couple of different storage devices. To be able to handle such big file I used my Stevie editor with a 1 MB SAMS. Having that much RAM allows me to keep the file completely in memory. The DV80 file I used is the TI Invaders source code as found here: http://aa-ti994a.oratronik.de/TI_Invaders_TI-99_4A_Disk_Version.txt I have tested with following devices: >1000. IDE Card IDE DSR v14 Seagate ST32140A 2GB hard drive First partition IDE1 >1100. Standard TI Disk Controller Freshly formatted BASF floppy disk in drive 1 >1400. TIPI PEB Raspberry PI 3b with 16gb ssd card >1700. HRD4000B ROS 8.42c 4MB RAM disk I clocked total file operation duration using a timer on my mobile phone. For each device I repeated each test 3 times; meaning 3x loading and 3x saving the file. That way I can iron out some of the inaccuracy of my manual timing measurements. To keep compatibility as high as possible, I'm solely using level 3 file I/O. However, for devices that support file buffers in RAM I additionally repeated the test (3x loading, 3x saving), with the buffer in RAM instead of VDP RAM. This is how the test procedure looks like for the load test: Reset console Start Stevie editor Load DV80 from device and time duration until file is shown in editor. Reset console Back to 1 (next device) This is how test procedure looks like for the save test: Reset console Start Stevie editor Load DV80 from HRD4000B partition 1 Save DV80 to device and time duration until file is saved. Reset console Back to 1 (next device) For the sake of science I have spent quite some time on this, repeating the tests over and over 😄 Even though absolute times are not that important (they depend on my file loading handling in the Stevie editor and memory handling specific to Stevie), I do think that comparing times between devices certainly is relevant. With that you get a rough idea what speed the devices offer compared to each other. Durations are in seconds. The "Save slowness" factor indicates how much time the saving of the DV 80 takes, compared to loading. For example, for the TIPI device it means that with the file buffer in VDP RAM, saving the DV80 takes 1,13 times as long.
  2. I finally managed to finish the DLI work, so here is the new FastBasic version, ready for the 2020 tenliners! You can now create a DLI with a simple syntax, capable of changing registers at multiple locations in the screen. The full documentation is in the manual at https://github.com/dmsc/fastbasic/blob/master/manual.md#display-list-interrupts , but here is a little sample of the DLI support, showing how to multiplex two P/M to create 4 moving two-color sprites: ' Player shapes DATA p1() BYTE = $E7,$81,$81,$E7 DATA p2() BYTE = $18,$3C,$3C,$18 ' Players horizontal positions DATA pos() BYTE = $40,$60,$80,$A0 ' Players colors DATA c1() BYTE = $28,$88,$C8,$08 DATA c2() BYTE = $2E,$80,$CE,$06 ' Our DLI writes the position and ' colors to Player 1 and Player 2 DLI SET d3 = pos INTO $D000, pos INTO $D001, DLI = c1 INTO $D012, c2 INTO $D013 ' Setup screen GRAPHICS 0 : PMGRAPHICS 2 ' Setup our 4 DLI and Players FOR I = 8 TO 20 STEP 4 POKE DPEEK(560) + I, 130 MOVE ADR(p1), PMADR(0)+I*4+5,4 MOVE ADR(p2), PMADR(1)+I*4+5,4 NEXT ' Activate DLI DLI d3 ? "Press a Key" ' Move objects! REPEAT PAUSE 0 pos(0) = pos(0) + 2 pos(1) = pos(1) + 1 pos(2) = pos(2) - 1 pos(3) = pos(3) - 2 UNTIL KEY() ' Disable DLI and ends DLI Attached is the resulting XEX, this is the resulting screen: The new release is over github, download at: https://github.com/dmsc/fastbasic/releases/tag/v4.3 Have Fun! dlitest.xex
  3. Hi all! I have a new beta (test) version of the next FastBasic release (4.4), I need your help testing the IDE - specially the editor, as it has many changes under the hood to make it smaller. The changes in this version are: - Adds BREAK key handling to the IDE - this was long overdue, now you can press BREAK key to return to the IDE from your program. - Adds COPY/PASTE to the editor, you need to press CONTROL-M to "mark" a line in the editor, then when you press CONTROL-C that line is copied after the current one. Pressing CONTROL-C multiple times copies multiple lines. Changes to the language: - Adds "CLR" statement, that un-dimension arrays and sets all variables to 0. Changes to the cross-compiler: - Allows to compile to code that can be put in a cartridge - by removing all uses of self-modifying-code and adding a stub to copy the zeropage interpreter from ROM to RAM at startup. - Allows accessing to DATA's from external assembly files. - The CC65 tools are included in the distribution, you don't need to install CC65 to use the cross-compiler anymore. Have Fun! EDIT: See newer beta version at: fastbasic-v4.4-beta-macosx.zip fastbasic-v4.4-beta-win32.zip fastbasic-v4.4-beta.atr fastbasic-v4.4-beta-linux64.zip
  4. IDE for developing in TI99 Assembler on the PC (Windows) (using NotePad++ Editor, xdt99 Cross-Assembler and MAME Emulator) https://github.com/miriki/TI-xdt99-IDE/ Hi, all! A few may have noticed: In an xdt99 thread I have published a Batch for DOS that shortens a lot of typing work when developing software. After years of abstinence from the TI99 I actually remembered the "good old days" developing tools and libraries again and tried to recall what I was doing those days. Well, 35 or so years... Firing up the MAME emulator, using TI99_4ev as machine, a cartridge with Editor/Assembler inserted and the needed disk in DSK1 mounted I started typing a few lines while reading through a bunch of books and forum articles. Hmmm... A PC keyboard and the function keys of the TI99, two worlds collide. Yes, the editor _was_ a very good one, at least that days. But nowadays I really, really prefer the comfort of NotePad++ or at least any other GUI based editor. Then I've read about the one or another Cross-Assembler to develop in Windows and using the output to mount within MAME. Almost right from the beginning I got stuck with xdt99, a collection of not only a cross-assembler, but other tools like a "disk creation", too. An integration into "IntelliJ IDEA" sounded good, but.... Hmmm... Maybe I have not digged deep enough, but there is only the editor used for syntax highlighting, isn't it? Putting things together: A batch for DOS (Windows, Microsoft, sorry...) was created that enabled the workflow from editing the Assembler source code assembling the source code into object code creating a disk which contains the object file starting an Emulator with this disk mounted plus a few more tasks... To be honest: I don't like DOS batches with more than, let's say, 25 or so lines. The syntax is ugly and the CLI commands are far from comfortable - not comparable with a high level language. Changing default values is a pain, (re)storing user settings a tremendous effort and doing all with user parameters results in a jungle of % characters shattered across the lines. So I used that batch only as a sketch for a "real" project: An IDE for those tools written in a high level language. I decided on C# (VB.Net would have been the alternative), because it is the preferred language right now in our company. Training... If anybody would like to have a look at it: I just published that project on GitHub. That was kind of training, too. We use Azure DevOps in our company and I have to get familiar with those cloud based team thingy. So hopefully I published correctly - it is my first published project over there. https://github.com/miriki/TI-xdt99-IDE/ This is the main page of the project. There is a README, but empty as of now. You will find a subfolder "TI xdt99 IDE" though... There is a subfolder "snap" which contains a few screenshots of the published project: Settings_Xdt.png shows the settings to include the tools from the xdt99 package. Settings_Mame.png shows parameters for the emulator, including configuration of the peripherals etc. Settings_Ide.png shows the standard working area with buttons to start actions and checkboxes to set options. Output_CommandStack.png shows the list of calls to external tools like the editor, assembler etc. Output_Standard.png shows the standard output of the last command, for example the directory of the disk. Output_Errors.png shows the error output of the last command, if there is any. Emulator_AutoStart.png shows the XB output from DSK1.LOAD if "catalog" and "autostart" is checked. Output_Result.png shows the loaded and started demo program I was just working on. Another subfolder "publish" contains a "setup.exe" that should install the IDE. I'd like to get feedback, if that thing runs without any problems. But what has to be done? Well... Perhaps it is best to show my setup: E:\TI99 mame64.exe >roms ti99_*.zip >hash ti99_cart.xml (thanks again, mizapf!) >cart editass.zip minimem.zip exbasic.zip >disk *.dsk >hard *.chd This should be enough to start MAME using e.g. ti99_4ev as machine. Try it... mame64 ti99_4a If successful, try inserting a cartride: mame64 ti99_4a -gromport single -cart exbasic If successful, try connecting a peb with a hfdc in slot 8, a disk drive connected and a disk inserted: mame64 ti99_4a -gromport single -cart exbasic -ioport peb -ioport:peb:slot8 hfdc -ioport:peb:slot8:hfdc:f1 525dd -flop1 disk/flopdsk1.dsk whew... After the first start of MAME there will be a few more subdirs like cfg, nvram etc. You might like to start MAME with -createconfig and edit the output mame.ini to suit your needs. I added cart and cart2 subdirs to the roms path, disabled the info screen at startup and the like... Then I added a subdir >xdt99 xas99.py xdm99.py xbas99.py >lib vdptools.a99 >projects >gmode gmode1.a99 etc. The "lib" folder contains a "vdptools.a99" file right now. There are only a few routines to avoid "BLWP VSBW" etc. in it. The "projects" folder contains the, as you already might have guessed, projects I am working on - for example a "gmode" subfolder. And in the "gmode" folder there are gmode1.a99, tmode.a99, mulcol.a99 and bitmap.a99. With this setup the settings on the XDT and MAME tabs should be self explanatory, kind of... The right hand side shows extensions for the filenames. For example the source "gmode1" gets expanded to "gmode1.a99" for the editor, is compiled into "gmode1.obj" and will become "GMODE1O" when copied to the TI disk. You may change the settings on the MAME tab and can use the IDE purely as a frontend, if you like. The "run" button will start the emulator without fiddling around with an assembler or anything else. BTW: Settings are loaded at startup of the IDE and saved when the IDE is closed or any external program is called. The IDE tab is the "all singing, all dancing" desktop for your development. The left box lists all subdirs aka projects, the right box lists the source files in that (selected) project. The selection is shown additionally in the two textboxes in the upper right (for later extensions). The "edit" button starts the editor, the "assemble" buttons starts the xdt99 cross assembler. It creates the object, image and rpk files, if checked. If "all" is checked, not only the actual selected source but all within the project will be assembled. The "disk" button creates the disk to be mounted for the emulator. It copies the source, list, object and image files, if checked. Again: For "all", if checked. Additionally it can create a DSK1.LOAD to show the contents of the disk and / or load and run the object file of the selected source. The "emulator" button starts the MAME emulator with the configured devices. If set up properly you might select "TI Extended Basic" from the master selection, get the disk contents displayed and after "please wait..." the compiled program should start. The "ADE" button is a shortcut: (A)ssembler, (D)iskManager and (E)mulator - all in one shot. So after editing / saving the source the test only needs 1) click on "ADE" button, 2) any key at the master title screen 3) "2" for XB, then wait... and enjoy! The menu at the top has no function as of now. The status bar at the bottoms shows info about running external tools to the left, "idle" to the right otherwise. Have fun! Michael
  5. UPDATE: There is now a new version at: Hi all! To start the new year, and to provide a better Basic for all the new ten-liners, I'm releasing version 4.0 of FastBasic. The major changes in this version are under the hood: The interpreter has been changed from a stack-base virtual machine to a register plus stack, this makes the interpreter from 10% to 20% faster depending in the program. In the SIEVE.BAS benchmark, the Atari version is 13% faster and in the cross-compiler is 19% faster, but programs depending on fast PEEK and POKE should be much faster. There is now a full test-suite to automatically catch regressions in the parser and interpreter, ensuring that bugs don't re-appear. Also, there are some user visible changes: There is now a command-line compiler "FBC.COM", this allows compiling large programs that don't fit in the full editor. Currently, "FBC" accepts the full floating-point syntax. Added minimal support for Player/Missile graphics: PMGRAPHICS (abbreviated PM.) statements setups P/M, PMHMOVE (abbreviated PMH.) horizontal moving a a player/missile, PMADR() returns the address of the given player/missile data. Many small bugs fixed. In this version the integer IDE is 8188 bytes in size (we still have 4 bytes less than 8K), and the floating-point IDE is 9405 bytes. As always, full sources and binaries for Atari, Linux, Windows and MacOS are available over Github: https://github.com/dmsc/fastbasic/releases
  6. Can someone recommend a relatively simple, easy to learn & use, yet powerful enough to do what I want, imperative programming language like BASIC or Visual Basic, for making Atari VCS and 8-bit type games for the Windows desktop (or maybe Linux but prefer Windows)? I would mainly be making 2-D games - stuff like Pong or Combat up to 8-bit Atari or Commodore era games, but probably nothing more complex. Maybe remake Pinball Construction Set or classic Ultima. Some features that would help relatively self contained (not 1,000,000 libraries you have to go through) free or not too expensive (this would be just for fun) easy to find lots of sample code for how to do things, and strong active community to ask questions built in IDE (preferably a visual IDE) and most importantly: currently supported and should continue to keep working for some time developed with a backwards-compatible philosophy so your programs will still work after a couple years! I have dabbled in various languages / systems over the years and made some games or partial games: Commodore 64 / BASIC - easy but games ran too slow, compiler helped speed games up, used some simple assembly for speeding up little routines (hard!) Commodore 64 / Gamemaker - easy but too limited (plus I missed being able to type code) Mac Classic / Pascal - limited to black & white graphics, couldn't find any info on making sounds (pre-Web so it was very hard to find docs or examples) Windows / QuickBasic - nice and easy but obsolete & couldn't figure out anything past text graphics and simple beeps Windows / VB6 - I liked the language and IDE but limited graphics support (bitblt, kind of confusing), and I never figured out playing >1 sounds at a time, just playing back WAV files one at a time; eventually VB6 became obsolete so I had to start over Windows / VB.NET 1.1 and some C# - the .NET language kept changing and got too complicated with the enterprise OO features JavaScript / HTML5 - figured out canvas graphics, Javascript syntax is easy but I am not crazy about HTML and CSS, and parts of language were too complicated and ugly (prototype stuff, too many libraries & frameworks, no types, etc.) Python / Pygame - mainly playing around with other people's code from pygame.org, still not comfortable with Python, not crazy about certain things like the indentation, no types, too many libraries / choices, dependencies and things changing too much that can break your code, etc. After all these years and languages I still prefer BASIC or VB6 syntax (JavaScript/C syntax is OK, Pascal is OK) and a visual editor. Mainly I don't have a ton of time to invest in learning stuff and if I get busy (which is often the case!), I might put a project down for months at a time, or even a couple years, and by the time I get back to it, the language I wrote it in has updated/changed or become totally obsolete, and I have to go back and fix my code or start over from scratch. I know computers change and all that but come on So anyway, if anyone has any advice or recommendations that would be grand. And hey, if it doesn't exist, it doesn't exist, but I thought I would ask! PS here are some pages I was looking at, in no particular order - if anyone can share any opinions on these, please: SDLBasic XBASIC BASIC Compiler (Windows, Linux) QB64 (Windows, Mac OS X, Linux), QB64 Just BASIC (Windows) SmallBASIC (Windows, Linux, N770/N800, PalmOS, eBookMan) ThinBasic Basic Interpreter (Windows) ElectronJS How to create a 2D game with Python and the Arcade library | Opensource.com FUZE4: Bringing BASIC to Switch — Wireframe Magazine I am really looking for Windows, but this caught my eye! Construct 2 – The Windows favourite Clickteam Fusion 2.5 – The veteran RPG Maker – The RPG specialist Microsoft Small Basic (wikipedia) Unity (probably not what I am looking for) Microsoft MakeCode Arcade (info) Atari Dev Studio A way to make games for the 2600 using BASIC? Hmm... DarkBasic GLBasic Liberty BASIC PureBasic RapidQ REALbasic (Xojo) XBasic Free BASIC Compilers and Interpreters (thefreecountry.com) https://www.gamedesigning.org/career/software/ https://www.websitetooltester.com/en/blog/best-game-engine/#GameSalad_The_Educators_Choice What is the easiest programming language to make games with? - Quora App Development - Infinite Runner - CodaKid Action! is an Atari-specific programming language written by Clinton Parker and sold by Optimized Systems Software (OSS) in ROM cartridge form starting in August 1983. It is the only language other than BASIC and assembler) that had real popularity on the platform and saw any significant coverage in the Atari press; type-in programs and various technical articles were found in most magazines. In comparison, languages like Forth and Logo saw much less use and almost no press coverage. Processing Tutorial: Building a Simple Game | Toptal Much appreciated
  7. From the album: ADTX 2.5inch SCSI to IDE HD adapter

    ADTX 2.5inch SCSI to IDE HD adapter, hard drive above with adapter attached below
  8. Hello everyone, I'm a beginner on Atari programming and I'm creating an IDE to allow people to create Atari games without having to write a single line of code. I'm learning Assembly as I go through the IDE and add more stuff, it's helping me a lot. This is what I've got so far: A simple IDE that lets you draw the playfield and change the color of both playfield (COLUPF) and background (COLUBK). If you hit the "Play" button, it will produce the following result on an emulator: This also generates an assembly code file, please take a look at this file to help me with the questions: atarix_result.asm So, considering I've read a few articles about programming, I've come to a conclusion that every single line of code matters when you're programming for Atari. So I would like to ask a few questions: 1. Looking at the file (atarix_result.asm), is the generated code bad? What optimizations should I look forward? How can I optimize this code? 2. What kind of things should I avoid when drawing to the playfield? 3. Also, is there a way to get rid of the parts showed on the second screenshot? (Where the arrows point at). Or is this an expected behavior? Thanks!
  9. I'm in starting phase of making an engine/game maker for 8-bit Ataris and would like to hear your thoughts. There are couple of routes it could take and I don't won't to make something no one would use Please answer the poll if topic interests you and you think you have a game in you that's just waiting to come out. Notes: - Plan is to make PC version first (Win,Linux, Mac) and later maybe native 8-bit version if there's interest in it. You write scripts, edit sprites, tiles, map, sfx, music on PC. Press a key and emulator starts your game. - Scrolling is tougher to make so first version will be single screens. If people ask for scrolling we'll see what can be done. - Most important question for me is if there are more coders or users interested in something like this. Game makers like Shoot'm'up construction set on C64 or AGD on Spectrum have almost no scripting capabilities and are limited to a certain types of games. AGD is better as it allows more freedom but still something better for coders exists. Good example is Pico 8 "Fantasy console". It's basically a simple 128x128x16 colors graphis engine with support for sprites, sound fx, music and player input. What makes it great is scripting based on Lua language. So you can make any kind of game you can stick inside memory limitations. - Graphics engine will be simple and probably slow at first with more graphics modes, sprites and speed later. ps. Here is a good article on Pico 8: http://www.indieretronews.com/2015/10/pico-8-8-bit-fantasy-console-from.html Thanks ! Vladimir.
  10. I was curious what peoples' strategies were for managing large .bas source files. (Maybe there's a super-obvious solution I missed, I am kind of a noob at this.) I bring it up because one of the biggest challenges I've encountered so far has been working with really large multi-bank games, where you have thousands of lines of code. I guess I'm just spoiled by OOP and modern IDEs! I've tried Visual bB - which is really slick, and I've heard there's some sort of bookmarking feature, but I didn't dig to deeply into that. What I've actually been doing is using Visual Studio Code and splitting up my source file into several .bas files. (bank1.bas, bank2.bas, etc) Then, I have a build action run a script that merges these parts into one large master .bas file that gets sent to the batari compiler and then the emulator. It actually made things a little easier for me.... I'd be happy to post that if it's useful to anyone. Or maybe there's an easier way you know of?
  11. Hello everyone, Today I've released the first Work in Progress video for the AtariX IDE I've been working on. The video showcases some of the tools in the IDE, like the Playfield Editor and the Object Editor, also the HUD which allows you to pick a font and a color for the 6 Digit Score. Next thing I'm going to work on is the LOGIC part of the Object Editor, which will allow developers to add properties to the object (like collisions, input etc) without having to write a single line of code. The main goal of AtariX is to help newbies to get into Atari game development and also for advanced users to build some prototypes, so you can export the Assembly code and add more advanced stuff into your game. If you have any thoughs or ideas, please let me know.
  12. Hi all! A new release of FastBasic is available, this is Release 3. This release has with many enhancements, mayor ones: - Added string comparison operators, - Interpreter is about 3% faster in FOR loops and other simple operations. SIEVE benchmark now takes 17 seconds. - The integer-only IDE is now less than 8KB, the floating point IDE is 9.2kB, and there are 200 bytes more available for the programs. - Cross compiler produces smaller executables by only including used parts of the runtime, a simple '? "Hello"' compiles to 453 bytes, including the interpreter and runtime. Minor improvements to the IDE and language: - The IDE now can edit files with lines of up to 255 bytes. - The IDE is a little faster to parse large files. - More abbreviations to the statements, The list of abbreviations is in the manual. Mayor improvements to the cross-compiler and optimizer: - New scripts for the cross-compilers allows passing options to the compiler and linker, also writes label files for debugging. - Cross compiler gives better errors in many cases. - Optimizer for NEG/MUL/DIV/MOD and all bitwise operations. - Optimizer ignores comments and can span multiple lines. - Adds tail-call optimizations (replaces CALL/RET with JUMP and JUMP to RET with RET) And many fixes: - Optimizer no longer ignores negative numbers, - Correct corner cases with MOVE / -MOVE, updates docs. - Cleanup all variables and arrays on run, fixes on memory-clearing function. - Fixes some cases of integer to floating point comparisons. - Fixes parsing of NOT with parenthesis and NOT/NOT. - Fixes errors on line numbers > 255 in the IDE. - Fixes some corner cases in the IDE editor with lines at top/bottom of screen. - Parsing of statements after a ':' ignored errors. As always, full sources and binaries for Atari, Linux, Windows and MacOS are available over Github: https://github.com/dmsc/fastbasic/releases Have fun! Edit: current version is v4, announcement at https://atariage.com/forums/topic/288617-fastbasic-40-tenliners19-release/
  13. Hello! After some searching for MADS highlighting for Vim, I haven't found nothing useful, so I decided to write something new… The only solution like this which I found was vim-xasm, the XASM highlighting, but it wouldn't enough good to use with MADS (lack of preprocesor directives and so on) So, here it is! Completely new plugin, suitable for every serious Atari coder with Vim as his main editor. (Note: If Vim isn't your primary editor yet, give it a try! But remember, some of your habits will be quickly broken :>) URL for GitHub Repository (aka "The Giant DOWNLOAD Button"): https://github.com/skrzyp/vim-mads (of course, if you're not familiar with Git, you can still grab this plugin as archive, but you'll lose the ability to update it when something new will be added/corrected) Installation Manually: Put folders syntax and ftdetect in your Vim configs directory: Windows: %USERPROFILE%\vimfiles Rest of world: ~/.vim Recommended: Using Pathogen Clone this repo into your Vim path: git clone https://github.com/skrzyp/vim-mads ~/.vim/bundle/vim-mads Of course, I'm fully open for any suggestions and comments, even if you found any bug or problem, tell me here or make a pull request. I'm also very interested about any feedback from users. Screenshot (sorry, I don't have a code which use a full potential of MADS, but if someone has, send me your pic, please)
  14. Hello all. I am in search of an IDE Plus 2.0 IDE-to-XL/XE interface. It appears they are not for sale that I have been able to see. Does anyone have a lead where they are sold, or is anyone interested in selling one they are not using? Cheers, dreamWeaver
  15. Finally, I've managed to make a VisualbB installation wizard, replacing Tinkernut's. I've put the new version of visualbB in it, and this is made with the Inno Setup program. If there are any bugs or unknown things it should not be doing, let me know and I'll fix it. You can get it at https://www.mediafire.com/?38pxw0885565x77 EDIT: I've made it with Inno Setup, it's the link. I'm going to update the installer every time VisualbB updates.
  16. Good morning from Michigan, USA! A few weeks ago, I purchased an AEC-7720u to use with my ICD MIO (1mb version), and was able to have MetalGuy66 send me the ROM upgrade for it (Thank you, MG!). I ordered a new SCSI cable from Amazon last week, and started messing around with things this past weekend but then got to wondering why I was even bothering since I use my SIO2USB for pretty much everything already. So, I figured I'd sell the card and cable and get my investment back at this point. However, while I wait to see if anyone expresses interest in it, I think I'd still like to see if I can get it up and running with the MIO, but the instructions that come with the Acard are far too simplistic for my level of understanding-- and since I never ventured into the hard drive aspects of the MIO back in the day (SCSI drives were simply too prohibitive for me back in the early 90s!!), nor did I ever have to mess with SCSI configurations when I went PC, I am turning to the pros here after not being able to track down via Search any info that seemed helpful. So, I have the MIO and the card and what I presume is a feasible PATA IDE hard drive (I have a 4gb as well as a 13gb). What do I do next? And didn't I read somewhere that the MIO's SCSI interface is upside-down (or was it the BBox that is upside-down)? I presume that I'll need to provide power to BOTH the hard drive as well as the card. The instructions for the card are crazy-vague about the power terminator jumper, saying that its default is on, yet there isn't a jumper ON that connection (J2, I think, since I don't have the card near me atm). As for the hard drive, should it be set to Single? I would presume that the answer is yes, but this is SCSI, so... uncertainty there. In the MIO configuration, I change the drive type to SCSI, of course (right?). But then it asks me for ID, LUN and I'm lost again. I did read on an ST board elsewhere on the internet that ALL of the jumpers need to be off to get an ID of "0" when connecting to an ST. Is that the case here with the MIO, as well? And what is the LUN to be set as? The next thing it asked was something that had 256 as the first option when I spacebar'd it. I didn't go past that because, again, I've no idea what it's for or what I need to set it as. The next thing after that had something like a Start setting and then an End setting. I think I went with 256 as the start, and then did the end as 4096, and ended up with the size (left column) being 1mb. What do I do with either a 4gb or 13gb drive, then? Are there max limits for the Atari or MIO when it comes to these settings? After this set of steps, do I then proceed with SpartaDOS's HDINIT? And what will it need to be told? Lastly, rather than a mechanical drive, should I perhaps look into buying an IDE-to-CF interface instead? And if so, what should I look for in the CF (for example, capacity limits?)? I really do apologize for what looks to me, as I re-read this, a LOT of hand-holding-- I'm hoping that this might not only help ME but also anyone else in the future who is just as unfamiliar with this aspect of 8-bitting. If this works, though, I'll obviously keep the card. But right now, it seems like such a daunting project compared to peeling and repairing mylars on 1200XLs <nervous chuckle>. With appreciation, Tim
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